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October 11, 1985 - Image 59

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1985-10-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

Your Hosts: Lenore & Jack Freed

Present



echnion Dinner
arks Anniversary

The 30th anniversary of the
edication of the Sir Winston
hurchill Auditorium at the
echnion-Israel Institute of
ethnology will be celebrated at
he 37th annual dinner of the De-
roit Chapter of the American
ociety for Technion to be held at
6:15 p.m. Oct. 21 at Adat Shalom
Synagogue.
The auditorim was named in
honor of the late British prime
minister on the occasion of his
80th birthday.
In December 1954, the British
Technion Society announced that
it would raise funds to honor Sir
Winston with an auditorium
bearing his name at the
technological institute. His son,
Randolph laid the building's cor-
nerstone in October 1955 and in
May 1958, the building was for-
mally dedicated.
A fire gutted the building in
1979, and the British Technion
Society contributed funds for its
rebuilding. The rededication took
place in June 1980.
Attending the dedication was
the late statesman's grandson,
Winston S. Churchill, MP, who
will be the guest speaker at the
Detroit dinner.
Winston S. Churchill is vice
president of the British Technion
Society and a member of the
House of Commons.
For information and reserva-
tions to the dinner, call the De-
troit Chapter office, 559-5190.

DYNASTY DUO

Tuesdays Thru Saturdays
LISTENING
9 p.m. to 130 a.m.
Playing Your Favorite Top 40s
DANCING
COMPLETE DINNER MENU

Banquet Facilities Available

RED
CEDARS

hYttcrvirran; '
gialde': ?
6E1/4
t
ArliDa=e°C"

on full course dinners!

— EARLY BIRD MENU —
AND BEFORE THEATRE

Fish • Chicken • . ,Steak
Soup, Salad, Fm tree, 2 Vegetables &

Dessert.

$7 . 95

353-5110,

23055 TELEGRAPH 0 .9 MILE RD.

MAMA MIA RESTAURANT AND LOUNGE PRESENTS

THEATRE FOR EVERYONE

PEANUT BUTTER PLAYERS,

Detroit's Only Professional
Children's Luncheon Theatre presents

TOM SAWYER

OPENING OCTOBER 19, 1985

Group rates available

Presented by
NANCY GURWIN
DINNER THEATRE

OPENING OCT. 12
$17.95/PERSON
includes dinner

$7.95/person — includes lunch
Saturday & Sunday Performances
Lunch 1 p.m.—Show 2 p.m.
Reservations required

"tit
111DIACIL

F-1

559.3893

WOODWARD AVE.

JUST•

Nottni (IF 13

MILL

549-4411

_
( OnCe

laW r4-5.

STARRING NANCY GURWIN

Directed by Edgar A. Guest

1

III



I Reservations required GROUP RATES available call 363.1535 I

BOTH SHOWS APPEARING AT

MAMA MIA RESTAURANT AND LOUNGE

SEIFUL LESSANEWORK and wife Fellech Mekaska own the Flue Nile Restaurant in Detroit

Food for the brave

The Blue Nile serves intriguing Ethiopian cuisine

9361 Cooley Lake Rd., Union Lake, Michigan

SATURDAY PERFORMANCES

RESERVATIONS • 363-1535

Area Doctor
Issues Plea

The

' rfed Evening

Lobster,Wine and Roses

A complimentry rose for her, glass of wine for him.
11/4 lb. Maine Lobster for each.

$16.95 per person

FOR-MEN

i

BETH SHALOM MEN'S
CLUB will have its annual
movie night at 7:30 p.m. Oct. 23
at the synagogue. The feature
will be The Treasure of Sierra
Madre. Refreshments will be
served. There is ,a ominal,ad -
omission charge: For information
and, reservations, call Harry
Freind, 352-7216.

Be in the right PLACE
at the right time
. . . and enjoy savings of 50%

MON.- FRI. 4-7 P.M.
SAT. 5-7 P.M.

Cocktails, Dinner 7 p.m. • Show 8:15 p.m.

A Farmington Hills physician
has issued a plea for freedom for
three Jewish counterparts in the
Soviet Union.
In a letter to Soviet Health
Minister Sergei Burenko, Dr.
Gershon Weiner urges amnesty
for prisoners of conscience Dr.
Vladimir Brodsky, Dr. Zachar
Zunshein and Dr. Yuri Tar-
nopolsky. The letter was hand-
delivered last week by Dr.
Weiner to Dr. Yu Lopuchin, a
visiting physician from the
Soviet Union, with the. hope
that it would reach the Soviet
Health Minister.
Dr. Weiner presented the let-
ter as a member of the Physi-
cians for Social Responsibility,
according to Jennie Weiner,
chairman of the Detroit Soviet
Jewry Committee of the Jewish
Community Council.

Friday, October 11, 1985 59

• 1

11.#
. Available Monday thru Friday
Jacques popular Fall menu is again
available friday evenings.
p.m. Dinner 6-11 p.m.
Lunch 11:30
For Reservations Call 642-1373
30100 Telegraph (N. of 12 Mile)

There's a triple reward at the Blue
Nile, Detroit's Ethiopian restaurant, for
those who aren't afraid to try something
new.
First, you're sampling an authentic
cuisine, representative of one of the
world's earliest civilizations. Second,
the food is flavorful, healthy and served
in a novel, intriguing and sensible way.
Third, adventurous diners get a
psychological advantage over timid
meat-and-potatoes fans.
The restaurant, newly relocated in
Trapper's Alley in Greektown, has two
dining rooms, one for authentic Ethio-
pian dishes, the other for both Ethio-
pian and Western food. If you want au-
thentic Ethiopian, you sit in one room,
with a distinctly African decor. If you or
a companion are afraid to try something
new, you sit in the Safari Room, where
the atmosphere leans more to the Great
White Hunter theme.
It's possible to get the Ethiopian dis-
hes in the Safari Room. But the main
dining room doesn't serve the Western-
style food.
ETHIOPIAN FOOD and table proce-
dures, which we enjoyed in the main
room, resemble both Indian and Arab
customs, but are wholly Ethiopian. No
knives or forks. Large pancake-like flat
bread is used as a tray for the food. You
eat with your fingers, wrapping bits of
bread around the food.
The tradition is that diners feed one
another, but the Blue Nile doesn't insist
on this, and we didn't try it. But it's fun,
and surprisingly efficient once you get
the hand of it, to use your fingers for.
eating. And the helpful staff provide big
moist table napkins.. •
The Blue Nile'emenu notes that one
of the favorite seasonings is Berbera, a
sauce based on hot red peppers. Upon
reading that, "unaccountably lost my
sense of adventure, although , my fa-
vored curry in an Indian restaurant. is
either hot of extra hot I later regret-
ted the lack of courage. •
WE- BOTH. ORDERED dishes with
the milder seasoning of niter kibbeh, a
- clarified herb butter combined with
onions and several spices. Both dishes
---' chicken and a vegetable medley,
were delicious. The food, far from
being BOO; was simple and delicate,
the flavor pf, the main ingredients
shining , through the mild spices.
There was a noticeable lack of fat,
thanks. a the ancient het-climate

necessity to preserve food from spoil-
age. Except for the'-bread, which
though it came in large quantities is
thin and plain, the whole meal must
have been very low in calories.
Another ancient Ethiopian necessity
reflects itself in the tea served at the
Blue Nile. Because sugar was scarce
and expensive, tea was traditionally
flavored with spices. The result, cen-
turies later, is an intriguing, gentle
brew, a benison to the palate.
THE BLUE NILE started about a
year ago in a location out Woodward
Avenue, then moved to Trapper's
Alley soon after that restaurant-
booth-shop complex opened a couple of
months ago. It's on the top floor (two
escalators and one stairway up) and
it's peaceful and relaxing. There's a
bar (license expected soon), a tiny re- -
ception area, the window tables over-
look the Greektown rush.
The Blue Nile's owners are Sefu
Lessanework and his wife Fellech
Mekaska (in their native Ethiopia,
wives do not take their husband's
name). She opened the restaurant. Her
husband, experienced in hotel work
with Hilton hotels in Africa, Europe
and North America, left his Position as
manager of. one . of Chuck Muer's
branches to open the expanded Blue
Nile in Trapper's Alley.
PRICES ARE :REASONABLE by
Detroit standards. Beef and lamb
entrees begin at $5.95, and there are
some vegetarian dishes at $4.75. With
each entree comes a choice of two-from
six vegetable side dishes, including
•chopped 'spiced griehs and pureed len-
tils. Ethiopian coffee, roasted and
ground on the, premises, is $1.25, as is
the spiced tea 'also:. The Safari Room •
'- menu had, such things :as shrimp
cocktail 44:50 . chicken '-terriaki at
$4.75, and beef and fish dished.
Blue Nile, in Trapper's Alley, Mon- •-
, roe St., Detroit, (313) 964-6669 Mon-
day to ThiirsdaY, 11:30 a.m. to 9 p.m.;
, Friday and Saturday to midnight.
Sunday 3 to 9 p.m. Major credit cards
accepted., --

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