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August 30, 1985 - Image 14

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1985-08-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

14 Friday, August 30, 1985

GAYNORS

LOW PRICES
EVERYDAY!

INOW OPEN SUN.

ORCHARD PLACE

NEWS

Fresh Air

Continued from Page 1

ORCHARD LAKE RD.
S. OF 14 MILE RD.

855-0033

GAYNORS

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552-0088 dw ,

August 30, 1985
Dear Friend,
As concerned citizens, we are asking you to join us in supporting
Mayor Donald Fracassi in the upcoming primary election on Sep-
tember 10th.
Knowing Mayor Fracassi, we appreciate and admire his dedica-
tion, his integrity and his pride in the City of Southfield. Mayor Fracassi's
desire to keep our city an outstanding community is an unselfish
quality rorely found. His administration has brought a distinction to our
city of which we can be proud.. Please vote on September 10.
Sincerely,

Honorable John Deras,

Coundimon
and former Coundl President

Frank Brock
Vivian Bryant
David Durnstein
Johanna Cothery
Honorable Peter Cristiano,

Coundiman

Clarence Durbin,

former Coundiman

and former Coundi President

Debbie George
Dr, Les Goldstein
Sam Ho*
Dr. Leon Head**
Oscar and Ditatrice Hertz
Martin Hollander,
tormorfauadiman

and former Council Preildent

Honorably lbw HIM,

Coma dasidint

Lillian Joffe-Oaks,

former Coundiwoman
and former Coundl President

Robert Kato
Florence LaPonso
Dr. Marvin Last
Meyer Leib
John Marcosky,
former Coundiman

Florine Mark
James McDermott,
former Coundiman
and former Coundi President

Honorable John Olson,

County Commissioner

Honorable Alex Pednoff,

County Commissioner

Tom Ilcbardson

Salida low*
DIG Mink Seidman
Mad; Wait
brow r Cardeas
Aid Was
Clad 1 Ito 1 I iy

'T i

Tzvi Kelman, one of 11 Israeli sou nselors at Camp Tamarack this
summer, untangles a fishy problem



friends, learn new skills and,
for many, to discover their
Jewish identity.
Today's youngsters still
sing camp songs, swim and
collect mosquito bites. The
camp itself, though, has
undergone many changes,
both structurally and
philosophically.
The Brighton campsite was
founded in 1925 by the Fresh
Air Society, with 55 acres of
land donated by. Mr. and
Mrs. Edwin M. Rosenthal,
and a $90,000 grant from
United Jewish Charities
(UJC).
The Fresh Air Society it-
self dates to 1902, when a
small group of young women
known as the Fresh Air
Committee of UJC decided to
conduct "fresh air" picnics at
Belle Isle for under-
privileged, immigrant chil-
dren and their mothers. By
1912, the camp had moved to
Venice Beach, near Lake St.
Clair, where it remained
until 1927 when all camp ac-
tivities were moved to
Brighton, 45 miles from De-
troit.
Fresh Air Camp began op-
erations with 16 counselors
for 200 children. Campers
were rotated through three
activities, "waterfront," "ath-
letics" and "handicrafts," Ev-

erything was planned for
them.
Today there are 99 staff
people for 250 campers, age 7
to 10, and programs are var-
ied and flexible, In addition
to the. traditional sports and
crafts, activities now range
from drama and "clown
training" to treasure hunts
and Israeli dancing,
Today's Camp Tamarack
experience is WO on four
areas of involvement:
• Cohesiveness, in which

campers learn the impor-
tance of a "group" and the
way it binds its members to-
gether.
• Judaism, whereby pro-
grams strengthen the chil-
dren's Jewish identity. Is-
raeli counselors have intro-
duced a greater Jewish
influence to the camp. For
some children, Fresh Air
Society provides the only
positive Jewish experience
they know.
• Skill development, in
which campers learn swim-
ming, sailing, arts and
crafts, and more.
• Nature, including canoe
and hiking trips, as well as
building campfires and
learning about flora and
fauna.
Over the years, in addition
to the broadened activities,
the camp has undergone
physical changes, including a
major renovation completed
this summer.
The old dorms have been
completely rebuilt. There is a
new dock on the waterfront
and new siding on all of the
buildings. Funds for the
project were provided by the

Jewish Welfare Federation,
United Foundation and the
Sam and Mollie Burtinan
Endowment Fund of the
Fresh Air Society,
While Brighton's look,
along with its programming ,
has changed since 1926,
some things remain the
same, Brighton still practices
the Fresh Air Soceitt! 1902
motto: "Illo Jowiab wild will
be deprived of e •emp ex-
perience bowie of look of
funds." Clow to oue•third of
ton campers
this pais
CAM OD
Data AC Mom oft& AIWA
W4foew Adoroilos anlied the
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