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August 09, 1985 - Image 67

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1985-08-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

Friday, August 9, 1985 69

••••••••••••••••

ENTERTAINMENT
ADS
GET RESULTS

Call

call Elaine's in-laws to find
out how things were:"
The Idens travel to Israel
whenever they can, their
most recent visits in March
and April this year. "I man-
age to see them at least once
a year," Shirlee explains.
But my parents are in their
80s and desperately want to
see their great-grand-
children. The girls usually
spend time with them in
Florida during their visits."
Barbara Lefton has always
felt fortunate that her
daughter, Susan Lefton De-
utch, could visit every sum-
mer. Now the visits are even
more precious because of Su-
san's three-year-old son,
Asaf.
Susan traveled to Israel
first in seventh grade, fell in
love with the country, de-
cided to go back for tenth
grade and stayed for high
school. Even then, she knew
she wanted to make Israel
her home. She spent three
years in the army, graduated
from nursing school and
married an Israeli.
Although reluctant at first,
the Leftons now feel more re-
laxed about Susan's aliyah,
taking great pride in her
creative, independent spirit
and her positive contribution
to Israeli society. Barbara
explains, "We raise children
to stand on two feet. When
your child is doing some-
thing positive, how can you
be negative?"
This positive philosophy
still doesn't lessen their
sense of loss. "We've always
missed Susan," Barbara ex-
plains. "It's even more dif-
ficult with the baby. We've
seem him only three times.
By the time he's part of the
family (during a visit), he
leaves and we won't see him
for another year!"

The Jewish News
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The Bayers are also involved in a petition campaign, asking the
Israeli government to exempt recent immigrants from the $300
travel tax.

grate, most parents unanim-
ously hope for their child's
successful aliyah. Most par-
ents echo Iden who says, "I

have never, ever wished that
they wouldn't make it. I
wanted them to succeed.
They are working so hard."
Yet Americans and Cana-
dians traditionally have a
lower success rate than dim
from other English speaking
countries. Benny Schwarz,
Israel's emissary (shaliach)
to Detroit explains, "There
are major difficulties to over-
come. Cultural shock is
common. Daily life, such as
standing in long lines, and
shopping, plus the tension
and stress of the economy
and army service need to be
overcome and worked out,

Several parents of Detroit
ohm, who asked to remain
anonymous, found that fear
for their children's safety
colored positive acceptance of Unlike people from other
their children's aliyot. They countries, Americans leave.
spoke of reading newspapers They have somewhere to go,
with tense alertness and other options.
"There are great benefits
riveting to the television
with the slightest mention of to derive living the real
Jewish drama unfolding in
Shirlee Idea deals with Israel, And the Israeli gov-
this anxiety by "thinking of ernment offers many *co-
every-day Israel and not in nomic aid programs. Yet sac-
terms of anything happen- awful aliyah depends on the
nfi," Many parents find their
onxiety lessens with each
Harmon Bayer sees the
trip and with each passing Jewish community's wort
year,
of its ohm as the critical in-
Whether or not they gradient to a successful
e nthusiastically support aliyah, "In other
heir ehild's decision to oak the Jewish community and

federations actively support
their o/im, financially and

emotionally. That's what the
PNAI is trying to do here."
Nationally and locally,
PNAI has developed creative
support programs, offering
()him a sense of community.
In cooperation with the Met-
ropolitan Detroit Israel
Aliyah Center, Michigan
Chapter has compiled a di-
rectory of Detroit families
living in Israel. The 1985 di-
rectory lists 220 families.
Esther Tal of the Aliyah
Center encourages those
with additional names to
contact her at 661-1084, •

Harmon Bayer is working
to establish a Detroit
Hometown Club in Israel.
Similar clubs have been
helpful in easing absorption
of Om into Israeli society.
One hundred people attended
a Detroit reunion last year
in Jerusalem and Bayer has
another reunion for Detroit
olim on the drawing board.
The numbers are few; the
challenges great. Those
choosing to make aliyah are
the modern day pioneers,
e for
One can only hop
mutual understanding and

respect Wales the aill, and
their WAIN Jet Wiled,

Susan laits Seal gsp,
do MIN if *Mix lit to
sad* wilaiiiimmirt)

ji

,A*4 1

/7/

Topperie ham Ole right gift for Dom.

114400 Wog 1Arr4rs Ulfir 40.0
140044114ouiv it Mil. 4itiostkommairm Nom ►

AI MOO

//

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