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July 05, 1985 - Image 58

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1985-07-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

.58 Friday, July 5, 1985

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

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Jordan's Queen: Israel 'A Fact Of Life'

BY NEIL REISNER

Special to The Jewish News

"Israel must face the real-
ity that war will never win
the peace it must have to
secure its future," Jordan's
Queen Noor al Hussein re-
cently told Princeton Univer-
sity's graduating class of
1985.
"Israel must face the in-
eradicable human presence of
millions of Palestinians re-
solved to regain their rights
in their ancestral homeland,"
said the American-born Queen.
"It must make its choice:
either continued conflict or
permanent peace and securi-
ty; either existence with
honor or the total erosion of
its founding principles.
"Many Arab states," she
said, have accepted "what
Jordan had long realized —
that Israel was a fact of life
in the Middle East."
"We in the Middle East —
Arabs and Israelis alike —
cannot continue to expend
our precious resources —
human and material — on a
conflict that no one can
afford."
The queen's visit was at
the invitation of Princeton's
senior class. It was part of a
tour of U.S. campuses ap-
parently intended to influ-
ence public opinion in favor of
the recent agreement be-
tween Jordanian King Hus-
sein and Palestine Liberation
Organization Chairman Yasir
Arafat to pursue a joint
strategy for peace.
The queen spoke about the
Jordanian-PLO agreement
concluded in February, but
did not refer to subsequent
diplomatic moves by Hussein
and Egyptian President
Hosni Mubarak. She said she
was bringing no messages to
the U.S. government.
"I am not really here to
convey messages to the ad-
ministration as much as to
convey messages to people,
the students at universities
and the people of the United
States,' she said as she
walked with her entourage
between campus engage-
ments before her evening
speech.
"I'm trying to clarify some
of the political developments
in the Arab world," she said,
"and to stress on a philosoph-
ical level what we're hoping
for — what motivates us, our
objectives and all the states
in the region."
The 33-year-old queen was
born ,Lisa Najeeb Halaby in
Washington, daughter of Na-
jeeb Halaby, former chair-
man and chief executive of-
ficer of Pan American World
Airways.
The queen was a member of
Princeton's first co-educa-
tional class. She graduated
with a bachelor's degree in ar-

chitecture and urban plan-
ning. After graduation, ac-
cording to her official bio-
graphy, she worked on urban
planning and design projects

in the United States, Aus-
tralia, Iran, Jordan and
elsewhere in the Mideast. She
was the director of planning
and design projects for Alia,
the Royal Jordanian Airline,
before marrying King Hus-
sein in 1978.
The queen's visit came on
the heels of a flurry of dip-
lomatic activity that follow-
ed the Hussein-Arafat agree-
ment. Their original initiative
was based on a proposed in-
ternational peace conference
leading to creation of a con-

"To those in the West
who seek security for
Israel, we say this
Arab commitment
would guarantee the
security of Israel and
the Jordan-Palestine
confederation."

federation of Jordanian and
Palestinian states in what is
now the West Bank and Jor-
dan. Meeting later with
Mubarak, Hussein agreed to
a modified plan under which
a joint Jordanian-Palestinian
delegation, which would ex-
clude PLO members would
first meet with U.S. officials
in Washington. This would
be followed by direct negotia-
tions with Israel.
The queen used her Prince-
ton visit to reiterate Jordan's
call for renewed direct U.S.
participation in the peace pro-
cess, which she said is in-
creasingly urgent.
"I think the United States
has a role to play, an impor-
tant role. I think we all have
important roles to play, each
one in its own way," she said
before her speech. "But I
think that together we must
each play that role now."
A tall, striking blonde who
looks and sounds more like
the students to whom she
spoke than the consort of a
Middle Eastern monarch, the
queen — her Arabic name,
Noor al Hussein, means
"Light of Hussein" — fre-
quently referred to the tur-
bulence of the '60s as she
urged her audience to "Grasp
every opportunity to under-
take good and timely action."
"My generation of stu-
dents did not 'rebel' against
the American system," she
said. "We did not seek blind-

ly to ravage its political,
economic and social orders,
but rather to humanize them
— to make the reality of
American life synonymous
with the promise of American
ideals."
Queen Noor said she is
"convinced that the Ameri-
can experience of the '60s and
'70s is directly relevant to the

challenge of peacemaking in
the '80s."
"The Palestinians and the
majority of Arab states," she
said, "have come to terms in
the past decade with the chal-
lenge and reality of Israel.
We have made our choice."
The queen charged Israel
with pursuing a policy of
"military activism and ter-
ritorial expansion in the name
of security. It has reaped, in-
stead, greater insecurity. To-
day, in assessing the extent
of its dismal failure, Israel
need only consider its rash in-
cursion into Lebanon where,
in pursuing one adversary, it
has only created another."
The current Jordanian-
PLO initiative, she said,
"represents an important
breakthrough in the Arab
search for peace . It is an in-
itiative that holds enormous
promise if it is received with
the trust and good will with
which it has been offered::
"To those in the West who
seek Arab recognition of
Israel's existence, we say this
Arab commitment offers
mutual recognition of Israeli
and Palestinian national
rights," the queen continued.
"To those in the West who
seek security for Israel, we
say this Arab commitment
would guarantee the security
of Israel and the Jordan-
Palestine confederation."
The United States, she
said, "has proven its deep
commitment" to "the home-
land of the Jewish people."
But "there are still the
millions of Palestinians who
look to America to translate
its declarations into concrete
policies and to apply the prin-
ciple of self-determination to
all people."
Expressing the fear that
"we are moving toward a
potential global conflagra-
tion," Queen Noor said Jor-
dan is "acutely aware that no
country today can assure its

security by military might.
While we are realistically con-
cerned about strengthening
our defense capabilities, we
know that the only lasting
security lies in peace."

UN Leader
Decries Bias

United Nations — United Na-
tions Secretary General Javier
Perez de Cuellar has voiced his
disapproval of the frequent ex-
pressions of anti-Semitism at
UN meetings, the World Jewish
Congress (WJC) reported last
month.
Peres de Cuellar, In a reply to

94 members of Congress who
had, complained to the UN
leader about biased outbursts
from Saudi delegate Maarouf Al
Dawalibi, called the remarks
"racist, shameful and totally
unacceptable."

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