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June 28, 1985 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1985-06-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

10 Friday, June 28, 1985

f

ll

110 11011•1 11111 6•111110

ME NM

Family Run Pharmacy

I PEPSI & DIET PEPSI
6 PACKS
.1

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PHARMACY

,KEN

(no limit)

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Oil or Lotion

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• FREE DELIVERY
• SENIOR CITIZEN DISCOUNT

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OFF 1
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on your next
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5548 Drake Rd.
West Bloomfield

20%

(corner of Walnut Lake &
1 mile north of J.C.C.)

2.49

(limit 2)

661-0774

Expires 7-31-85

Mon.-Sat. 9 a.m.-8 p.m.
Sunday 11 a.m.-5 p.m.

OFF

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LINDEN

HOME HEALTH CARE

WE WILL DELIVER TO YOUR
HOME THE FINEST IN HOME
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AND INSTRUCTIONS ARE INCLUDED.

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WE HAVE HEALTH CARE PROFESSIONALS —
NURSES & THERAPISTS — ON
STAFF TO AID YOU IN THE SELECTION
OF THE PROPER EQUIPMENT & USE.

HEALTH

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WE CARE FOR OUR PATIENTS
AND — MOST IMPORTANTLY —
WE CARE ABOUT OUR PATIENTS

CARE

OSTOMY
OXYGEN
WHEELCHAIRS
HOSPITAL BEDS
WALKERS/CANES
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AND MANY OTHER ITEMS

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WE BILL INSURANCE DIRECTLY ON COVERED GOODS & SERVICES

J.C.C.'s
Health Sale

Summer Health' Club rates
for July and August

$55

per
month

(Or $90 for both months)

Now the Jewish Community Center's fabulous Health Club
is available at very reasonable summer rates. Use the squash
and racquetball courts, the pool, sauna, whirlpool, exercise
room, Nautilus, the track. Health Club classes are included,
too. Lt's a wonderful way to make July and August very
healthy . . . at wonderful savings. Call 661-1000, ext. 166.

6600 W. Maple, W. Bloomfield, Mich. 48033 661-1000
Due to this special offer, summer Health Club membership fees
must be paid in full in advance.

NEWS

Agencies' Increase

Continued from Page 8

elude the Fresh Air Society,
United Hebrew Schools-
Midrasha, Detroit's three Jewish
day schools and the Jewish
Community Center.
Local agencies in the commu-
nity services category will re-
ceive $2,188,182, an increase of
$176,844. This sum will help
meet the needs of elderly and dis-
advantaged, as well as those re-
quiring counseling and voca-
tional assistance. Of particular
concern are developments at the
Jewish Home for Aged, whose
residents are older, more frail
and less able to pay for services
than in the past. Federation's in-
creased subvention to the Home
(up $100,000) reflects the declin-
ing number of non-Medicaid
clients, as well as mounting nurs-
ing costs.
The Federation board approved
an allocation of $202,624 for Rus-
sian resettlement services (up
$4,000 over 1984) and $387,000
to the Jewish Community Coun-
cil (up $37,000).
A total of $578,659 went to cap-
ital funds (up $177,251) to help
Federation and its agencies plan
for substantial building needs in
the coming five years. Detroit is
one of the few communities in the
country with a capital reserve
fund.
Twenty national agencies re-
ceived $598,280 (up $28,460) for
the coming year. They include
two new beneficiaries, the Na-
tional Jewish Resource Center,
headed by Rabbi Irving Green-
berg and dealing with educa-
tional concerns, and the Center
for Jewish Community Studies, a
Jerusalem-based think tank
headed by former Detroiter Dr.
Daniel Elazar.
Other national beneficiaries
include the American Jewish
Committee, the National Confer-
ence on Soviet Jewry and the
Joint Cultural Appeal.
The sum allocated to HIAS,
Jewish Telegraphic Agency and
the American-Israel Cultural
Foundation was $126,000. Re-
duced funding for HIAS, the He-
brew Immigrant Aid Society, re-
flects the continued decline in
numbers of Soviet Jews allowed
to emigrate.
The lengthy budgeting process
this year was under the leader-
ship of James August, chairman
of the Conference of Division
Charimen; and the following:
Culture and Education: Peter
M. Alter, chairman, and Dr. Dan
Guyer, Allan Nachman and Mar-
vin Novick, associate chairmen;
Community Services: Stuart E.
Hertzberg, chairman, and Har-
vey Gordon, Edythe Jackier and
Jessie Stern, associate chairmen;
National and Community Rela-
tions Agencies: Lawrence S. Jac-
kier, chairman, and Mark R.
Hauser and Beverly Peterman,
associate chairmen; and Capital
Needs: Hugh Greenberg, chair-
man, and Herbert Sillman and
Jerome Halperin, associate
chairmen.
The process this year included
additional communal input at
this spring's Town Meeting pro-
gram at the Jewish Community
Center. Peter Alter told The
Jewish News he believes the

"process of consensus" is working
well. "There are no revolutionary
changes" in the allocations.
"Change occurs gradually, and I
think that's right. In the final
analysis I think we've been very
successful."
Alter said the allocations fol-
lowed no formula. "We tried to
evaluate in a concerned and
realistic way and look at each
agency's particular needs and
particular problems."
As examples, he cited in-
creased funding for Yeshivat
Akiva, which has a long-term
debt problem, and the problems
of the Home for the Aged.
Alter credited the Max M.
Fisher Jewish Community Foun-
dation for many innovative pro-
grams at local agencies. Pilot
programs funded by the founda-
tion have a proven record when
the agency boards must decide on
their value and funding after the
foundation funding has run its
course.
The foundation currently funds
10 programs totaling $200,000.
Some of these are the in-home re-
spite care program at Jewish
Family Service, Fresh Air
Society's Teen Israel Travel Mis-
sion, the Community Network for
Jewish Singles at the Jewish
Community Center and the
Jewish Information Service.

Lecture Series
Sparks Protest

Tel Aviv (JTA) — The latest
incident in Israel's ongoing "kul-
turkampf" — the insistence by
ultia-Orthodox Jews that the
secular community conform to
their religious demands — oc-
curred outside the Habima Thea-
ter building in Tel Aviv Saturday
morning when a strong force of
helmeted police and border police
armed with clubs and shields
acted to prevent a riot.
The Orthodox, angered by the
regular Saturday morning lec-
ture series which began at the
Habima Theater earlier this
month, marched from their quar-
ter a considerable distance away
to hurl abuse at ticket-holders,
journalists and photographers
and curses at the police who
formed a barrier which prevented
them from reaching the theater.
The police also kept in check a
counter demonstration by secular
Jews sponsored by the Citizens
Rights Movement (CRM).
Mayor Shlomo Lehat affirmed
that the weekly lecture series
will be held as scheduled. He said
the lectures and panel dis-
cussions do not violate the Sab-
bath and the Habima Theater is
not in an Orthodox neighborhood.

Ties Endorsed

New York (JTA) — Fifty-four
percent of Americans oppose a
reduction of ties with Israel ac-
cording to a recent telephone poll
conducted by Chilton Research
Services Inc., of Radnor, Pa. and
supervised by ABC News.

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