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June 14, 1985 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1985-06-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.



The War That Went Wrong 3

Good News, Bad News For American Jews

44

Elie Wiesel Says A Jew Alone Is A Jew In Danger

88

Esther Broner: Feminist And Zionist 25

1■111■■■•■=i
THIS ISSUE 50c

SERVING DETROIT'S METROPOLITAN JEWISH COMMUNITY

JUNE-14, 1985

Public Perceptions
Worry Carl Levin

General community sees
Jewish groups as 'one-
issue' oriented.

BY ALAN HUSKY

Craig Terkowitz

News Editor

Two rabbis at left blow shofars while being ticketed in Washington.

Sending A Message

Local rabbis diverge on
colleagues' activism
outside the Soviet Embassy
in Washington.

BY TEDD SCHNEIDER

Staff Writer

A pair of Detroit-area rabbis in-
volved in community efforts on behalf
of Soviet Jewry differed sharply this
week over the merits of political ac-
tivism by religious leaders following
Monday's arrest of 21 rabbis during a
demonstration outside the Soviet Em-
bassy in Washington.
"I support their cause and the way

Births
B'nai Mitzvah
Classified Ads
Editorials

72

Engagements
Obituaries
Purely Commentary

52

Danny Raskin

34

Singles

66

Synagogues
Women's News

58

68

73

4

87

2

41

they went about it," Rabbi David Nel-
son, of Cong. Beth Shalom said Tues-
day. "I find their efforts worthy of emu-
lation."
Rabbi Nelson, who is an active
member of the Jewish Community
Council's Detroit Soviet Jewry Com-
mittee, said such protests not only
"make a statement to the Russian
leaders, but let the world know that
Soviet Jews are not going to be forgot-
ten as our brethren were 40 years ago
in Germany."
But Temple Beth El Associate
Rabbi Norman Roman thinks there
are other, better ways of getting the
message across. "I doubt very much
that I would try to do anything that
was illegal. I think activism is neces-
sary within the context of being
Jewish, but I don't support illegal ac-
tivism in that particular situation."
Rabbi Roman also serves on the
Detroit committee, although he called
his role with the organization "mini-
mal." He is a member of the commit-
tee's speakers bureau and says he tries
to promote educational programs on
the plight of Soviet Jewry.
The Temple Beth El associate
rabbi sees more conventional methods
of activism as being just as effective as
the recent rash of public demonstra-
tions and arrests. He cited a 1983 trip
to the Soviet Union during which he

Continued on page 32

"How are you going to keep them
down on the farm" may be one of the
most serious issues facing the Jewish
community.
U.S. Senator Carl Levin (D-
Michigan) is so concerned about
farm-state perceptions of the Ameri-
can Jewish community and Israel that
he took a trip recently to Nebraska and
the Dakotas with his brother, Rep.
Sander Levin (D-Southfield).
Senator Levin told a Southfield
meeting of the local United Jewish
Appeal Young Leadership Cabinet

this week that the first person they
were introduced to told them, "You
guys are Jewish. It's a good thing
you're here. There's a lot of anti-
Semitism going on because people are
losing their family farms and they are
blaming it on the (alleged) Eastern
Jewish banking establishment."
"It struck us," Levin told the
breakfast meeting, "how fragile our
position is in America. What would
happen if we hit another Depression?
Which members of Congress could
withstand the pressure if someone gets
up and wants to move $1 billion from
foreign aid to the farm program, or
unemployment programs, school
lunches or programs for seniors.. .
"People are afraid. What if some-
one gets up and plays to those fears?"

Continued on Page 12

IIIIMINIIIM11111111111111111

CLOSE-UP

Ada Bandalene gets them exercising.

FILLING THE GAP

The Jewish Center branch
is undergoing a resurgence,
fulfilling inter-generational
and geographic needs.

See Page 14

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