100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

The University of Michigan Library provides access to these materials for educational and research purposes. These materials may be under copyright. If you decide to use any of these materials, you are responsible for making your own legal assessment and securing any necessary permission. If you have questions about the collection, please contact the Bentley Historical Library at bentley.ref@umich.edu

June 07, 1985 - Image 12

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1985-06-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

12 Friday; June 7, 1985

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

NEWS

OliLDN'T YOU RATHER HAVE 39 YEARS OF EXPERIENCE APPRAISE
YOUR DIAMONDS AND FINE JEWELRY? THEN YOUR BEST BET 15

• INSURANCE APPRAISALS
4, ESTATE & BANK APPRAISALS
. COURT APPRAISERS

• ESTATE LIQUIDATIONS
• GEMOLOGICAL CERTIFICATE
40 LABORATORY REPORTS

Call for your private appointment and ask about our new price schedule

Since 1946 - This is where it all Started

Hear first hand accounts of the actual

RESPONSE
to BITBURG

CHAIM, the Children of

Holocaust-Survivors Association
In Michigan, invites you to hear

BERNIE KENT and
CHARLEY SILOW

discuss their recent trip to
Bergen-Belsen undertaken as
part of the International
Network of Children of Jewish
Holocaust Survivors

Bernie Kent

RESPONSE to PRESIDENT REAGAN'S
BITBURG VISIT.

Sunday, June 9, 7:00 P.M.
Jewish Community Center
Room 239

West Bloomfield, Michigan

NO ADMISSION CHARGE

Charley Mow

JOIN CHAIM TODAY! YOUR SUPPORT IS NEEDED!

IN • OM

111n 1110•11

NM MI NIM NM MIMEO IN NE NM NI NM NI NE M= MI IN

11•I EMMEN

Yes, I would like to help support the work of Children of Holocaust-Survivors Association In Michigan by
joining CHAIM and making the following contribution:

ri Patron

n

Sponsor

Friend

ri Contributor



Member

$250

$100

$50
$25
$15

Name

Address

City

State/Zip

Phone

Mail this form and your tax-deductible contribution to CHAIM, 30805 Heimanciale, Franklin, Michigan

48025

this is no pipedream. David
Ignatius, the respected dip-
lomatic correspondent of The
Wall Street Journal, reported
last week that "a number of
U.S. officials, in what might
be described as a triumph of
hope over experience, remain
strangely optimistic about
what might happen" in the
aftermath of Hussein's visit
to Washington.
"The Reagan Administra-
tion, it seems, has a little
secret," Ignatius said. "The
U.S. believes that Mr.
Arafat, the man of the
scraggly beard and dithering
leadership, may be ready to
do what he has avoided
doing for 18 years — an-
nounce his unequivocal pub-
lic support for UN Resolution
242 and Israel's right to
exist. Believe it or not, that's
what American officials have
heard. And with Mr. Arafat
willing to provide cover, the
U.S. _ thinks that King Hus-
sein may at last_be_ ready to
take the plunge into direct
negotiations with Israel."
Reagan's reference to the
need for direct talks to get
underway by the end of this
year was no slip of the
tongue. He read it from a
carefully prepared statement.
The time frame is signiicant.
There is in Washington
today an acute appreciation
of the politics of Jerusalem,
especially the scheduled
end-of-1986 transfer of prime
ministerial leadership to Yit-
zhak Shamir. The Americans
want Peres to sit atop the
Cabinet during any peace
negotations with Jordan and
other Arabs.
Hussein has by no means
given up on the peace option,
although he repeatedly
warned during his public and
private statements this week
that time was running out.
So far, U.S. officials said, he
still disagrees with
Jerusalem's former deputy
mayor Meron Benvenisti,
whose West Bank Data Proj-
ect has concluded that Is-
rael's settlement activities
have effectively curtailed
any peaceful exchange of
land for peace. A senior Re-
agan administration official
who briefed reporters at the
White House following the
Reagan-Hussein meeting
agreed that time was cer-
tainly running out — but he
insisted that there was still
enough time for a deal based
on Resolution 242. The ques-
tion, however, is how much
time.
The most recent fighting
in the Palestinian refugee

.

camps of Lebanon, he added,
should serve to spur the PLO
leadership into recognizing
the futility of continuing its
"armed struggle" against Is-
rael. That path has brought
only misery, death and de-
struction to the Palestinians
for years. Now is the time for
negotiations.
Hussein has known this
for years. But he has been
unable to capitalize on his
.own particular vision of a
peaceful region. He may in-
deed be courageous, but
there are limits to his cour-

It's time for Arafat
to embrace a new
strategy or getout of
the way.

age. He risks not only politi-
cal suicide by moving too
boldly with Israel, but actual
physical destruction as well.
He is very much aware of
the fact that Syria is his
powerful neighbor to the
north. There are limits be-
yond which he can not move
without risking assassina-
tion.
Still, there are oppor-
tunities. "The pieces are all
in place," wrote Ignatius, re-
flecting a widely held view
within the State Depart-
ment. "The key is for Mr.
Arafat to bite the bullet: to
admit that his previous
strategy — mixing peace
feelers and guerrilla attacks,
maintaining a PLO consen-
sus by trying to please all
factions — has been a disas-
trous failure. The PLO
chairman has brought mis-
ery and ruin wherever he
has tried to operate; in Am-
man, in Beirut, in northern
Lebanon, as well as to his Is-
raeli victims. It's time for
him to admit that he has
failed and either embrace a
new strategy of negotiations
or get out of the way."
U.S. officials clearly be-
lieve that there has been a'
positive change in Arafat.
And that, they said, is criti-
cal right now.
All of which, they said,
points to some significant
opportunities in the coming
weeks and months. Reagan
and his senior foreign policy
advisers have made clear
their readiness to work hard
in getting negotiations off
the ground. The U.S., they
promised Hussein, will not
be aloof. But there is still a
considerable way to go before
that promise of negotiations
is actually realized.

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan