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April 26, 1985 - Image 47

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1985-04-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

kiay.;_Apal .V6, = 1985

iFfithLtkiliJEVOsH. NEIA/S-

Be sure and read our special

DAY CAMP SECTION

D • A • Y • C • A • M •

starting on pg. 43

Secular Camps

CAMP RAINBOW

Continued from Page 45

art, gymnastics, cooking, sci-
ence, music, woodworking,
playground, water play. 4:1
ratio for toddlers, 10:1 for pre-
school. $330 per four weeks
(five full day with lunch —
1984 fee).
ROEPER CITY & COUN-
TRY SCHOOL — 2190 N.
Woodward Ave., Bloomfield
Hills, 642-1500, director Ann
Sachs. Co-ed, Lower Camp
ages 3-5, Open Camp ages
6-11. June 24-Aug 16. Two,
four, six, eight-week options.
Lower Camp: pottery, dance,
music, arts and crafts, physi-
cal education, daily in-
structional swim, weekly pic-
nics, field trips, dramatic and
musical performances, ice
cream-making. Open Camp:
campers choose their activi-
ties for five periods from
crafts, fine arts, athletics and

games. Also beach activities,
picnics, field days, perform-
ances, one overnight per
four-week session included.
Campers 7 and older may reg-
ister for special interest
groups in science, dance,
photography, woodcrafts
(extra fee). 5:1 ratio. Approx.
$100 per week. Transporta-
tion extra.

UPLAND HILLS FARM —
481 Lake George Rd., Oxford,
628-1611, directors Knight
and Dorothy Webster. Co-ed,
ages 5-10. I—July 1-12, II—
July 15-26, III—July 29-Aug.
9, IV—Aug. 12-23. Two, four,
six or eight week full day op-
tions. 240 acres of rolling pas-
tureland, well equipped beach,
boats, fishing, horseback rid-
ing, farm, playgrounds, crafts,
ecology center, dancing. 5:1

ratio. $480 per eight weeks,
transportation extra.
WILLOWAY — 12 Mile Rd.
near 1-96. Winter address:
27580 Harvard, Southfield,
356-8123, directors Lorraine
and Arnold Fisher, Rita and
Mel Seidman. Co-ed, ages
5-14, I—June 17-June 21,
II—June 24-July 12, III—July
15-Aug. 2, IV—Aug. 5-Aug.
23. Emphasis on exposure to
many fun activities in an out-
door, non-competitive atmos-
phere. Sixteen acres, pond and
lake program, field sports,
dramatics, tennis, animal
farm, gymnastics, photog-
raphy, computers, arts and
crafts, swimming, weekly
cookout and scheduled over-
nights (extra fee). 6:1 ratio.
Approx. $370-$400 per three
week session including cook-
out lunch on Friday.

Israel President Catches The Public Eye

BY ELANA EIZAK KUPERSTEIN

8 one-week sessions beginning June 24
College trained staff
Activities include: swimming,
sports, arts & crafts,
special events and camping.

Fee: $40.00 per week

For further information call:

354-9603 or 545-6400

BLOOMFIELD SUMMER
DAY CAMP

Now accepting applications for two
5-week sessions.

SESSION I JUNE 17-JULY 19
SESSION II JULY 22-AUGUST 23

a

Special to The Jewish News

Sports are not among the ta-
lents Jewish leaders are tradi-
_ n for. President
tionally know
Herzog has shattered this
stereotype by engaging in
parasailing and golf, almost "exo-
tic" sports by Israeli standards.
The adventurous 66-year-old
president was recently seen soar-
ing over the Red Sea tied to a
bright parachute — quite a
change from the kind of flying he
was accustomed to during his Is-
raeli- Air Force career.
Herzog, an expert in sailing,
completed his Eilat vacation mak-
ing good time on a trip with the
local yacht club. He is a regular at
the Caesarea Golf Club, plays
tennis and squash, and as a child,
played rugby in Ireland and even
won some boxing trophies.
If you are not into parasailing
and are wondering what you could
do when you reach the president's
age, Israel can use your help.
About 100 retired Americans just
completed three months in Israel
as volunteers in hospitals, army
camps and youth organizations.
Many of them hope to repeat the
experience next year, while the
same program will soon bring
1,000 more enthusiastic Ameri-
cans to Israel.
More American aid to Israel
was performed on a very personal
level by American sailors. You
can often spot their uniforms on
Haifa streets, but this time they
worked hard on their shore leave.
The captain of the USS Sampson
found out about a Haifa family
whose apartment was flooded be-
cause of damaged plumbing. The
local authorities could not decide
who was responsible for repairing
it and the widowed mother and
seven children had no home.
On the captain's suggestion 15
officers and crewmen went to the
apartment with proper tools,
pumped water, repaired the pipes
and painted the walls and door.

A Summer Camp for
Mentally & Physically Impaired

Israel's failing economy can be oc-
casionally tempered through

humor and creativity. While the
economy is all packaged up, it is
clear that Package Deal II is not
doing as much as its predecessor
did to curb inflation.
At a recent Purim party at the
home of U.S. Ambassador Samuel
Lewis, the president of the Israel
Manufacturers' Association and
his wife appeared dressed up as
package deals I and II, with II
showing much evidence of weak-
ness and injuries.

Chaim Herzog:
Golf and parasailing

They even sent the laundry back
to the Sampson to be washed. The
large family returned to find their
apartment magically trans-
formed and ready to live in.
A new business venture will
cater to tourists who have been to
Israel before, but want to know
"more." Diplomatic Services
promises tourists unique sights
and insights usually reserved
only for foreign diplomats and
other VIPs. The new company will
be led by a former escort for the
Government Press Office, who
will now use his expertise on a
commercial basis.
Entrepreneurs do not stop at
the border — as was recently re-
vealed by Plassim, an irrigation
plant in Kibbutz Merhavia. The
company designed and sold an ir-
rigation system to King Hussein's
uncle in 1975. As the pipes crossed
a Jordan River bridge on their
way to Nasser's Ranch, Plassim
was paid $36,000 through a mid-
dleman. In Jordan, Nasser, the
King's uncle, explained that the
irrigation system was bought
from West Bank Arabs.
Even serious challenges such as

Peres Favors
`Star Wars'

Jerusalem (JTA) — Premier
Shimon Peres said Monday that
he personally was "unequivocally
in favor" of a positive response to
the Reagan Administration's in-
vitation to Israel to participate in
research for the Strategic Defense
Initiative (SDI), popularly known
as "Star Wars."
Peres told the Knesset's
Foreign Affairs and Security
Committee that the SDI program
signified a scientific revolution
and it was clearly in Israel's
interest to be involved in the
technology from the outset.
Peres' remarks to the Knesset
committee did not constitute a
formal reply to the invitation U.S.
Defense Secretary Caspar Wein-
berger extended to Defense
Minister Yitzhak Rabin in Wash-
ington last month. The formal re-
sponse is still being drafted by Is-
raeli experts and must be ap-
proved by the Cabinet before it is
conveyed to Washington.
But given the enthusiasm of
Peres and Rabin for the project,
there seems little doubt that Is-
rael will accept the invitation,
which was also extended to
America's NATO allies, Japan
and Australia.

2, 3, 4, 5-day programs available for children
ages 2 1/2 thru 9.

Hot lunches and transportation available.

• train rides
• swimming
• arts and crafts • petting farm

For more information call

851-4666

. . . only at

VaLLOWAY...

'Cause Willoway has

COMPUTERS
NATURE

POND AND LAKE
ARTS AND CRAFTS
SWIMMING POOL
WATER SKIING

PHOTOGRAPHY
ANIMAL FARM
DANCE
SAILING
TENNIS

GO-KART
FISHING
ATHLETICS

WILLOWAY OPEN HOUSE
SUNDAY, MAY 19

1-96 at Beck Road
1 to 4 p.m.

CALL LORRAINE AT 356-8123

WiLLOWAY

Day Camp, Inc.

47

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