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April 26, 1985 - Image 44

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1985-04-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

44

Fridai,_Ariril 26, 1985

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

AY

A M •

1NtW

-44444404414**400ft

and come home singing funny camp
songs. Many parents find summer
works best when it alternates the
structure of camp with the un-
structured freedom of loafing around
at home.
So, place your child's hand on the
Boy Scout Handbook (or Girl Scout
Handbook) and have him repeat after
you .. .

I SOLEMNLY SWEAR
NOT TO:

Throw my lunch away or trade my
cucumber sandwich, carrot sticks,
hard boiled egg and apple for two
brownies, one candy bar, a fruit roll-up
and pop tart.
Forget my bathing suit and expect
Mom to drive 15 miles to deliver it.
Bring my camp science project —
an egg made bouncy with vinegar —
into the living room.
Make the bus wait while I find my
gym shoes.
Wear the T-shirt from last year's
camp on the day we go on a field trip.
Empty my camp bag full of sand,
dirt, grass, cookie crumbs and a wet
bathing suit on my bed.
Get sick and lonely at 2 a.m. on
the weekly overnight and decide to call
home.
Jump into the deep end because
my friend dared me to . . . only, he
knows how to swim.
Cry every morning before I leave
and scream, "I hate Camp. I wanna
stay Home."

JEWISH CAMPS

ADAT SHALOM NURSERY —
29901 Middlebelt, Farmington Hills,
851-5105, director Janet Pont. Co-ed,
ages 21/2-6, I—July 1-19, II—July 22-
Aug. 9. Three or five half or full-day
options. Playground, crafts, nature,
movement and music, sand play,
water play. Four campers per coun-
selor. $250 per five full days one ses-
sion. $450 for two sessions.

JEWISH CENTER DAY CAMP
— 6600 W. Maple Rd., West Bloom-
field, 661-1000, ext. 115, director
Brian King. Co-ed, ages 3-16. I—June
24-July 19. II—July 23-Aug. 16.
Transportation. 'Emphasis on out-
doors. Use of Jewish Center and
environs: three multi-purpose fields,
two gyms, tennis bubble, outdoor
playground, nature trails, three pools.
Instructional and free swim. Four Is-
raeli specialists teach music, dance
and crafts. Also available are specialty
camps in tennis, gymnastics, perform-
ing arts, computers, fine arts, dance
and sports; the Safari travel program
and Teen Caravan. Reduced fee before
May 1: General and Block Specialty -
$365 (member)/$440 (nonmember) per
five full days. Safari - $390 (member)/
$465 (non-member). Teen Caravan -
$415 (member)/$490 (non-member).

UNITED HEBREW SCHOOLS
NURSERY — 21550 W. 12 Mile Rd.,

Southfield, 354-1050, directors Anita
Jacobs, Sylvia Handler. Co-ed, ages
2 1/2-5, I—June 24-July 12, II—July
15-Aug. 2, III—Aug. 5-Aug.23. Half-
day options and parent-toddler avail-
able. Optional lunch. Emphasis on in-
dividual attention. Outdoor activity,
full playground, water play, songs,
science, cooking, creative movement,
stories, arts and crafts, Shabbat party.
$170 per three full days session (1984
price).

WORKMEN'S CIRCLE SUM-
MER SCHOOL — 26341 Coolidge,
Oak Park, 545-0985, director Rena
Amit. Co-ed, ages 2 1/2-5 1/2, six-week
program begins June 17, three morn-
ings per week. "Fun in the sun," out-
door activities, water play, similar to
nursery program. Six-to-one ratio:

YESHIVAH BETH YEHUDAH
DAY CAMP — Primary and boys,
15751 Lincoln, Southfield, 557-6750;
girls, 32605 Bellvine Tr., Birming-
ham, 644-3114. Director, Rabbi
Lieberson. Primary is co-ed, ages
3-kindergarten, afternoons only. June
25-Aug. 17, register on a weekly basis.
Girls/boys — mornings, Hebrew
studies. Afternoon, field trips, daily
swimming and instruction, special ac-
tivities, use of O.P. and Southfield
municipal parks. Special night activi-
ties (extra fee). $35 per full-day week
for first child, $30 per full-day week for
second and third child. Kosher lunch,
transportation included. Primary only
transportation $10 per week.

From tots
to teens,
Detroit offers
numerous day
camp choices
for kids
staying home
for the
summer.

SECULAR CAMPS

APPLE TREE NURSERY
SCHOOL — 4100 Walnut Lake Rd.,
West Bloomfield, 682-6466, directors
Ramelle Alexander and Ellen Zim-
merman. Co-ed, ages 21/2-5. I—June
3-28, II—July 1-26, III—July 29-Aug.
16. M,W,F, a.m. only, 9:30-12:00. Ex-
tended option: M,F to 2:30. Small set-
ting with emphasis on individual in-
struction. Head teacher is specialist in
early childhood education. Outdoor
water play, nature walks, playground,
cooking, nutritional snacks. $415 for
full summer, $150 per four weeks,
$115 per three weeks.
BLOOMFIELD MAPLES MON-
TESSORI — 6201 W. Maple Rd., West
Bloomfield, 661-0910, director Usha
Mangrulker. Co-ed, ages 2 1/2-8. June
17-July 31, one, four or six-week ses-
sions. Half-day, full day and extended
day option (7:30-5:30). Montessori
program in morning with sensory
training, language, math, geography,
computers. Afternoon activities: gar-
dening, cooking, sewing, music,
dramatics, field trips.
BLOOMFIELD SUMMER DAY
CAMP — 4230 Middlebelt Rd., West
_Bloomfield, 851-4666, directors Gary
and Shelly Moss. Co-ed, ages 2 1/2-5 and
5-9. I—June 18-July 20, II—July 23-
Aug. 24. Two, three or five-day option.
Extended hours, transportation and
Tiocnch options. Three main buildings,
craft cabins, two swimming pools,

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