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April 12, 1985 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1985-04-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Frtda y, Api11,12,,1.913,

THE DETROIT JEWISH-:NEWS

AROUND TOWN

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This Canine Is Strictly
Kosher For Passover

r-- Th BY TEDD SCHNEIDER

\ Staff Writer

If, in your weekend travels, you
happen to cross paths with
Sheena, you may notice a certain
) mystical aura. Don't be quick to
it off as another example of
-- ithat "High-Pro Glow" for this
(that
member of the Ken-L-Ration gen-
eration. More than likely, it's
Sheena's Pesach pride shining
through.
While many people treat their
pets as family, the three-year-old
Rottweiler may have been the
only Detroit-area dog treated as
Jewish family this week — dining
on canine cuisine labeled "Kosher
for Passover."
Sheena's altered diet was ar-
ranged by her owner with the help
of Royal Oak veterinarian Dr.
L ) Howard Schwartz and Rabbi
( Kenneth L. Cohen, the associate
rabbi at Cong. Shaarey Zedek.
The reason for the change, accord-
), ing to the rabbi and the Southfield
woman who owns the dog, was to
1) ensure that her home would be rid
( of all chometz for the holiday.
"Anything (that isn't Kosher
for Passover) construed as edible
by humans, including dog food,
V must be removed from the house-
hold," Rabbi Cohen said. "In fact,
the definition of food for purposes
of kashrut is roi le'achalat kelev —
suitable for a dog to eat."
When Sheena's owner exam-
ined the dog's every-day food, she
found that it contained rice and
other grains not suitable on
Pesach. It was then that she put in
the call to Dr. Schwartz. The
Royal Oak vet contacted Rabbi
Cohen, who supplied a list of off-
limits ingredients and the search
for a Pesachdik dog food began.
Sheena, her owner and her vet-
erinarian eventually settled on a
prescription dog food which met
the Passover requirements. The
prescription food is usually re-
served for dogs who develop aller-
gies to store-bought varieties, Dr.
, Schwartz explained.
Rabbi Cohen didn't seem to feel
that Sheena's owner was "overdo-
ing it" in her Passover prepara-
', tions. Rather, the Shaarey Zedek
associate rabbi said she was play-
ing it by the book — in this case
the Old Testament. He cited the
porticin of the Torah which de-
scribes the Israelites' prepara-
tions for Passover.
"Seven days there shall be no
leaven found in your houses; for
whosoever eateth that which is
leavened, even that soul shall be

&

cut off from the congregation of
Israel, whether he be a stranger,
or born in the land. Ye shall eat
nothing leavened; in all your
habitations shall ye eat un-
leavened bread." (Exodus,
12:19-20).
Meanwhile, Sheena's owner,
who inherited the dog from her
daughter and son-in-law recently
when the couple moved to Israel,
doesn't think her situation is all
that unusual. "I'm not unique. I'm
sure other people have cooked
Kosher for Passover meals for
their pets." And Sheena enjoys
Pesackdik meals just as much as
her regular food, the Southfield
woman says.
Besides, since the Rottweiller is
a black, shorthaired breed which
originated in Germany, Sheena's
holiday diet may just be the con-
tinuation of an ancient family
tradition. Who's to say that some
of Sheena's European ancestors
weren't Ashkenazim?

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Holocaust Events
At MSU Hillel

The B'nai B'rith Hillel Founda-
tion at Michigan State University
has scheduled a variety of activi-
ties for the remainder of April.
The MSU Hillel, in recognition
of Holocaust Memorial Week, will
show the documentary To Bear
Witness 8 p.m. Thursday in 107 S.
Kedzie Hall.
Holocaust Remembrance Day
will be observed at MSU on April
21 with ceremonies set for 7 p.m.
at the McDonel Kiva. Speakers
for the event include Auschwitz
survivor Abraham Pasternak and
Prof. Walter Adams, one of the
U.S. soldiers who helped liberate
the camps in 1945.
Hillel's Monday Night at the
Movies series will feature The
Pawnbroker, 7:30 p.m. Monday;
This Is Spinal Tap, 7:30 p.m
Thursday; Singing in the Rain,
7:30 p.m. April 22; and Exodus,
7:30 p.m. April 29.
A Friday night discussion titled
"Why Jews Don't Believe in
Jesus" will be held tonight follow-
ing a kosher-for-Passover dinner
at the MSU Hillel. The topic for
the April 26 discussion is "Being
Gay and Jewish."
The Chabad Lubavich at
Michigan State will conduct "Ask
the Rabbi" open forums 5:30 p.m.
Sunday and April 28.

Our Readers Respond

A Jewish News readership survey has elicited an over-
whelnaing response in its first week. Publisher Charles A.
Buerger said the questionnaire, sent to 1,000 Jewish News sub-
scribers, "will help us learn more about our readers and advertis-
ers, and how we can better serve them."
The first week response of 458 "was exceptionally high,"
according to research manager Julian Balm of Scarborough Re-
search in New York. "A one-month response of 50 percent is very
good, but on the basis of the first week it looks as if The Jewish
News readers will do far better than that. The community seems
delighted to have an opportunity to express their views about the

paper."
The survey was mailed, at random, to every 14th name on
The Jewish News mailing list. Those who received the survey
have until the end of April to return the questionnaire.

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