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April 12, 1985 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1985-04-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

L Kosher Canine For Passover

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1

3

The Many Faces Of Today's Vacation

40

Creative Minyan With A Difference At Michigan

80

Daniel Elazar's Key To The Treasure

THE

THIS ISSUE 50c

25

SH NEWS

SERVING DETROIT'S METROPOLITAN JEWISH COMMUNITY

APRIL 12, 1985

Patio Peace Talks

Ezer Weizman's scheduled trip to Egypt
draws barbs from some Israeli politicians.

(-D

,--"

Jerusalem (JTA) — Minister-
Without-Portfolio Ezer Weizman
plans to go to Cairo on Monday to meet
with Egyptian leaders. The Israeli
Cabinet must first approve his trip,
although Foreign Ministry sources
stressed that the visit would be "pri-
vate."
Weizman, whose Yahad faction
won three Knesset seats in last July's
election and joined the Labor Party co-
alition, is one of the closest ministers
to Premier Shimon Peres. He met this
week with Foreign Minister Yitzhak
Shamir for what was described as a
preparatory discussion in connection
with his trip.
Shamir in the past has vocifer-
ously opposed Weizman's involvement
in foreign policy matters, especially
those concerning Israeli-Egyptian re-
lations.
That involvement has discomfit-
ted the rightwing of the political spec-
trum. The Tehiya Party urged Shamir
this week to oppose Weizman's trip to
Egypt in order to show that Shamir,
not Weizman, is running Israel's
foreign policy.
But the trip apparently will take
place. Weizman has not publicly de-
fined its purpose. He hopes to meet
with President Hosni Mubarak, Prime
Minister Kamel Hassan Ali and
Foreign Minister Abdel Ismet Meguid.
He feels that he can contribute to
furthering the peace process with
Egypt by helping resolve the current
disputes between the two countries,

Births
B'nai Mitzvah
Classified Ads
Editorials
Engagements
Obituaries
Purely Commentary
Danny Raskin
Singles
Synagogues
Women's News

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66
67
4

63

79

2-

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62
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54

Ezer Weizman is expected to meet with
Egypt's top leaders.

notably over the Taba region near the
Sinai border which Israel and Egypt
both claim.
Weizman's views on a resolution

of that dispute are known to differ
sharply from Shamir's. The former air
force commander has always been a
political maverick. A leader of Herut,
credited with organizing its successful
election campaign of 1977, Weizman
served as Defense Minister in the first
Likud-led government of Premier
Menachem Begin. The late Moshe
Dayan was Foreign Minister.
Both men played pivotal roles in
achieving the Camp David accords of
1978 and the Israel-Egypt peace treaty
a year later. But shortly afterwards,
Weizman resigned over what he felt
was the Likud government's foot-
dragging in the peace process with
Egypt. He was promptly drummed out
of Herut and remained in political
obscurity until he formed Yahad to
run in the 1984 elections.
He is now once again at odds with
Herut. Their differences at the mo-
ment center on Taba where the Egyp-
tians are insisting the dispute be sub-

Continued on Page 22

Middle East
War Of Words

Was 'Palestinian East
Jerusalem' in the Free
Press a new front in the
Middle East propaganda
war?

BY ALAN HITSKY

News Editor

"Judea and Samaria" or "West
Bank."
"Pre-State Israel" vs. "Palestine."
"Evenhandedness," "Palestinian
rights" and "self-determination."
These are some of the many
catch-words in the international arena
when debate centers on the Middle
East. Although the various sides and
their supporters jockey for position in
the letters columns of the metropoli-
tan newspapers, the battle of words
generally follows an established pat-
tern.

That overall pattern, often unac-
ceptable to Arabs and Jews because of
politics, calls for reference to
Jerusalem's Old City as "heavily
Arab" or "Arab East Jerusalem." In
other • stories, the words "terrorist,"
"guerrilla" and "fighter" are inexplic-
ably interchanged.
It was therefore a surprise last
Friday when the Detroit Free Press
printed an article in its "Foreign
Dateline" column which referred to
rioting and a general strike of shop
owners in "Palestinian East
Jerusalem." Was Palestinian East
Jerusalem a new front in the Middle
East propaganda war? Had the Arab
side gained some new ground? Was the
established pattern broken?
"It wasn't intentionally done as
political nomenclature," explained

Continued on Page 28

Is THE
NATIONAL
HOLOCAUST
MEMORIAL
WORTH
$100 MILLION?

While the concept
of a Holocaust
memorial in the
nation's capital
might seem as
sacrosanct as
motherhood and
apple pie, there
is an increasing
amount of controversy
about whether
or not the money
could be better
spent some other way.

BY MIMSI KROMER MILTON

Special to The Jewish News

See Story On Page 14

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