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April 05, 1985 - Image 78

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1985-04-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

78

Friday, April 5, 1985

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

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GRAND OPENING

SAVE UP TO 60%

OSAKA
SPA

ON DIAMONDS

• We Sell Diamonds Only
• By Appointment Only

.

TM ,

Haifa's Paris Square

BY CARL ALPERT
Special to The Jewish News

Call Jerry Turken at

355-2300

The New York
Diamond Cutting Co.

ALL EXPERT ORIENTAL STAFF

• Muscle Pressure Point Massage
• Swedish and Skin Tone Massage
• Sauna and Refreshing Showers

"The Diamond Cutters"

3000 Town Center, Southfield, Michigan

38499 W. 10 Mile

355-2300

Grand River Ave.

In Michigan Call Toll Free

1-800-346-1900

COMMENT

Co. .
©1485,NYDC

471-2777

Farmington Hills
Mon.-Sat. 10-1 a.m.
(Freeway Plaza)
romoMononolair
■ ww

Kosins

Uptown • Lathrup Village, Southfield at 11 1/2 Mile • Phone 559-3900
Big & Tall • Lathrup Village, Southfield at 11 Mile • Phone 569-6930
Toledo, Ohio. 4840 Monroe Street
Next to the Willows Restaurant. (419) 472-2651

_4111•11.

Prices good 4-5 1
thru 4-12
BUY A LITTLE,
BUY A LOT.
YOU SAVE EITHER WAY!

WISHING YOU A HAPPY, JOYOUS
AND HEALTHY PASSOVER HOLIDAY
THE CORNERS SHOPPING CENTER

Monday thru Saturday 10-9, Sunday 12-5

We Also Carry
Gourmet Foods

.

Haifa — Paris Square, in
downtown Haifa, got its name in
tribute to the French engineers
who built the city's underground
cable car, the Carmelit, which
commences its climb up the side of
the mountain from the first sta-
tion here.
But Paris Square is certainly
not as romantic or continental as
the name might lead one to be-
lieve. It is in a disreputable, run-
down part of the city, just off the
so-called Turkish Market, and a
stone's throw from the flea mar-
ket. The colorful human types
who pass through may give it an
exotic appearance, but the neg-
lected old stone houses, the semi-
ruined buildings and shabby
stores are certainly not on the
same planet with the Champs
Elysees.
Yet for a few hours each day,
Paris Square is the scene of a
gripping human drama which has
its roots in some of the most vital
poltical, economic and social prob-
lems of the State of Israel.
Almost at the first light of
dawn, shadowy figures begin to
gather. They are Arabs who have
come in with the first morning
buses, some from Galilee villages
like Tamra, Shfaram, Iblin and
Majd Al Krum. Some are from
Nazareth. Others come from
Jenin or nearby villages • in
Samaria, all crossing into Israel
on the same mission: a search for
work.
They lean on the iron railing
behind the Carmelit, or squat on
the sidewalks around the square.
Some are in Western dress.
Others wear the Arab headgear,
the kheffiyah, black and white
checked, or red and white
checked, in the style of the Jorda-
nians.
Prospective employers are not
slow in coming. A contractor who
has to meet a construction dead-
line, a restaurant owner who
needs two emergency dis-
hwashers, a private citizen who
has to move a heavy refrigerator
from one house to another — all
share their need for working
hands which will not reject a task

41

no matter how heavy, how dif-
ficult or how dirty.
None of the workers make any
attempt to look "desirable." Most
are unshaved and uncombed. This
is no beauty contest. The "adon"
wants muscles strong enough to
carry concrete blocks up four
flights, all day long. The youngest
and the huskiest get taken first.
The slight of build and the elderly
are left for last — sometimes day
after day.
It is an open market. A small
pickup truck pulls over at the side
of the street. Five, a dozen, 20 of
the men make a dash, surround-
ing the car and offering their serv-

The youngest and
huskiest get taken
first. The slight of
build and the elderly
are left for last —
sometimes day after
day.

ices. They grasp the handles of the
door, and seek to enter and seat
themselves, a fait accompli which
means they're hired for the day.
The experienced driver pulls
away from the crowd and opens
the door only for the character
who looks most desirable for the
work that has to be done. There is
no point to inquiring about skills.
They will all claim to be adept at
everything. Sonie of the Arabs
shout in Hebrew: "Look, re-
member me? You took me last
week. I can do the work well."
A private car pulls up — only
one laborer is wanted, and that for
a short while. Perhaps some
heavy work around the house.
One contractor, who takes five
men in his truck, admits he is not
happy. "I'd just as soon take
Jewish workers and pay them the
legal rate; but no one else wants to
load trucks with stones or do simi-
lar work."
The prospective workers carry

NOW! We have
Cheese and
Lunch Meat.

.



Member Detroit Area Retail
Kosher Meat Dealers Assoc.

Repeat By Popular Demand!

MON., APR. 8TH THRU THURS. APR. 11TH
Fresh Frozen TURKEY THIGHS
59c lb.
Empire TURKEY FRANKS
$11 39 lb.

,

We wish you all a HAPPY PASSOVER!

Cohen & Son Kosher Meat Market
26035 Coolidge, Oak Park
Dexter Davison Kosher Meat Market
24760 Coolidge, Oak Park
Harvard Row Kosher Meat Market
21710 W. 11 Mile Rd., Southfield
Franklin Kosher Meat
5564 Drake Rd., W. !Newfield

Northvale Kosher Meat Market
25254 Greenfield, Oak Park
Loots Cohen & Sons
New Orleans Kosher Meat Market
15600 W. 10 Mile, Smithfield
Singer's Kosher Meat Market
13721 W. 9 Mile, Oak Park

AD member markets will be closed Sim., April 7th and will reopen Mon., April 8th.

vorliraft,

,

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