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March 29, 1985 - Image 16

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1985-03-29

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16

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

Friday, March 29, 1985

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NEWS

Christians, Moslems Will
Cooperate In Lebanon

Tel Aviv (JTA) — Christian and
Moslem residents of south Leba-
non near the Israeli border have
promised to cooperate with Israel
to maintain peace and order in the
security belt just north of the bor-
der after the Israel Defense Force
(IDF) completes its withdrawal.
But they may well have to deal
with Palestinian terrorists who
confirmed Tuesday that they are
returning to the areas of south
Lebanon from which they were
ousted by the IDF in 1982, to con-
tinue the war against Israel.
About 100 Christian, Shiite and
Sunni Moslem dignitaries from
border villages met Monday with
Brig. Gene. Shlomo Ilya, the IDF's
chief liaison officer with the popu-
lation in the south of Lebanon.
Gen. Ilya promised that the "good
fence" — the arrangement by
which Lebanese could freely enter
and leave Israel for commercial or
personal purposes before June
1982 — would be re-instated after
the IDF leaves Lebanese soil.
The village leaders promised in
turn that they would support local
civil militias to maintain order in
the region and would encourage
young men to enlist in them. Gen.
Ilya, who met with them in the
Shiite village of J'bail, a few
kilometers inside Lebanon, said
the civil militias, along with the
Israel-backed South Lebanon
Army (SLA) would have a central
role in maintaining peace.
In Amman, meanwhile, Khalil
Wazir, senior deputy and top mili-
tary aide to Palestine Liberation
Organization Chief Yasir Arafat,
said PLO members loyal to Arafat
were returning to south Lebanon.
He confirmed that they have par-
ticipated in attacks on the with-
drawing IDF, carried out mainly
by Shiite terrorists.
The IDF in south Lebanon was
the target of 11 attacks in one
24-hour period last week, none of
which caused casualties. But an.
Israeli soldier was slightly
wounded in a clash with terrorists
during a search of Shiite' villages
last Thursday. Another soldier
has died of wounds sustained ear-
lier this month in an attack on the
IDF. A military spokesman iden-
tified him as Sgt. Yariv Lahav, 21,
of Moshav Tamerin.
Four attacks on IDF patrols and
convoys last week involved road-
side explosives near the villages
of Maaroub, Arab Selim and El
Basouryie, all east of Tyre. An
SLA patrol was attacked with
automatic weapons and rocket-
propelled grenades near Jarjoura
in the Nabatiya area, without
casualties.
The IDF said it killed 20 ter-
rorists in the course of searches of
two villages in the Nabatiya area
and seized large quantities of
weapons and sabotage material in
their possession.
Israeli officials are also keeping
a sharp watch on events in Sidon,
where rival religious factions
have been fighting for the past
three days.
The IDF evacuated Sidon, the
largest seaport in south Lebanon,
a month ago and violence erupted
there almost immediately.
The latest and most serious
battles are between rebel Chris-
tian Phalangist forces led by

Samir Jeajea and forces loyal to
President Amin Gemayel, head of
the Phalangist party whom the
rebels accuse of being under the
thumb of Syria.
Eight persons were killed in
Sidon last week and about 60
wounded. Moslem militiamen
who have joined the battle blame
Israel for the unrest. The Syrians,
like the Israelis, are keeping a
close watch on the situation but
have not intervened directly so
far.
Premier Shimon Peres, speak-
ing to high school students in
Nazareth this week, promised
that the IDF would be out of
Lebanon "far quicker than many

The Syrians, like the
Israelis, are keeping
a close watch on the
situation.

-

people think" because "we are
dealing with matters of life and
death, both as regaids our own
soldiers and as regards the resi-
dents of Galilee."
And Defense Minister Yitzhak
Rabin told the Knesset's Foreign
Affairs and Security committee
that Lebanon today is a more seri-
ous focal point of terrorism than it
was before the Lebanon war. He
warned there was no certainty
that the PLO would not return
there to join Shiite Moslem ter-
rorists against Israel.
At the same time, former De-
fense Minister Ariel Sharon con-
tinued his campaign of blaming
opponents of the war in Lebanon
for the present situation there.
Sharon, who is now Minister of
Commerce and Industry, charged
at a press conference in Haifa that
the total destruction of the ter-
rorist infrastructure in Lebanon
could have been achieved but for
political opposition at home.
"They prevented me from carry-
ing out our aims in Lebanon. They
didn't let me finish the job there,"
Sharon declared.

Judea, Samaria
Role Illuminated

Washington — Describing
Judea and Samaria as "forming a
significant portion of the Jewish
homeland to which all Jews
cherish special emotional and his-
torical ties," the Herut Zionists of
America presented testimony to
the Senate Foreign Relations
Subcommittee on Europe and the
Middle East earlier this month.
As part of his prepared tes-
timony, Seth D: Eisenberg,
Herut's national executive direc-
tor, said that "Judea and Samaria
are indivisible parts of the Jewish
homeland and Jews have an in-
alienable right to settle there."
Eisenberg also said that if Israel
was to lose control over Judea and
Samaria, "it would become vul-
nerable to deadly attacks either in
the form of terrorist infiltration or
a more ominous general offensive
against the heart of the land."

g‘o

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