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March 01, 1985 - Image 20

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1985-03-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

20 Friday, March 1, 1985

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PROFILE

Poetic Waves

Continued from preceding page

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increasingly conservative and
got more and more active with
his opposition to liberation of
mind, sex liberation, libera-
tion in the mind of poetry, and
the opening of new forms. He
keeps calling it anarchy and
disorganization and aggres-
sion and he himself is full of
aggression to the point of de-
manding B-1 bombers and
more and more nukes, and get-
ting more and more involved
with the military-industrial
complex himself and involving
the JeWish community that
way. And there's (his) racism,
which he masks as reasonable
common sense, but it isn't. It's
a very basic prejudicial emo-
tion.
"And he's also homophobic.
"I went to school with him,"
continues Ginsberg, "and I
used to edit his poetry for
Columbia Review and print it
when I was the editor and he
was a student. He wanted to be
a poet, but he didn't think he
could make it as a poet. So he's
got this sort of thing that he
didn't make it because he was
an intelligent fellow but un-
willing to experiment and be
frank and candid and com-
pletely clear. He was floating
on abstractions. He never
learned that lesson, so he went
into generalized journalistic
prose."
Was Podhoretz a conserva-
tive even then? "No, he was a
radical then. Probably a
Stalinist for all I know. He's
just a mirror image of that
now, a sort of right-wing
Stalinist instead of left-wing.
He's changed his terminology
from that of communism to •
capitalism and from Stalinism
to Judaism.
"He is backed by all that
money for Israel in America.
In the old days, no self-
respecting Jew would have
done as he has and gone along
with the anti-Seinitic racist
dictatorship's in South
America and South Africa.
"Now the Israeli karma is so
mixed up with repression in
Central' America and South
Africa that they have a very
shaky political position. They
may have some righteous fear
of communization and
authoritarianism, but on the
other hand, their very policy is
going to' bring that about by
repressing native radicalism
and sustaining old elitist dic-
tatorships that bring about
the very conditions for revolu-
tion and violence that they
abhor.
"Podhoretz explains his ra-
cism by saying he got beat up
cism
he as a kid by blacks
and still bears a trauma from

it. But people know this
method of spontaneous in-
sight, which is a neo-classical
discipline. His thinking is
linear, limited conceptual
thinking, and he's a little leery
and scared of non-conceptual
things, thinking that if it
doesn't exist it must be incohe-
rent because it doesn't depend
on words like he depends on
words.
"Podhoretz and (Rev. Jerry)
Falwell being in bed together
on certain political issues is
nearly the final straw. Falwell
would be the archetype of
what formerly was an anti-
Semite. He is the inheritor of
that old anti-Semitic Southern
Baptist authoritarian cruelty
toward race."
But the conversation ends
on a note of hope. "I don't think
the majority of American Jews
go along with it," says
Ginsberg. "They did, after all,
vote for Mondale rather than
Reagan.
"The whole comedy is that
in attacking the so-called
beatniks, the know-nothing
Bohemians, Podhoretz at-
tacked Kerouac who had more
sensible ideas in that same
area than Podhoretz does.
Kerouac was more anti-
Communist than the neo-
conservatives who denounced
him.
"Kerouac even got along
with William F. Buckley. He
liked his prose and Buckley's
anti-Communism." ❑

NEWS

MDA Supplies

Reach Kenya

Tel Aviv (JTA) — Some 55 tons
of food, medication, tents and
mobile field kitchens donated by
the 1Viagen David Adorn (MDA)
First Aid Society, Israel's equiv-
alent of the Red Cross, have ar-
rived in Kenya to aid famine vic-
tims in that country.
The relief supplies, shipped
from Eilat to the Kenyan port of
Mombasa last week, included 20
tons of flour, 20 tons. of sugar, 15
tons of edible oil, five tons of baby
food, half of a ton of antibiotics,
about 600 family tents and ten
mobile field kitchens — all
Israeli-made.
The goods were purchased and
shipped with funds raised follow-
ing an MDA appeal to the Israeli
public in line with a request from
the International Red Cross in
Geneva to Red Cross and associ-
ated societies throughout the
world for emergency aid for the
afflicted populations of several
African countries suffering from
drought and famine.

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