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February 22, 1985 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1985-02-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS . Friday, February 22, 1985

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NEWS

JEFFREY S. GOLDENBERG, D.D.S.
ZALMAN KONIKOW, D.D.S.



040000040000000 000

Black Leader Cites
Jewish Cooperation

San Francisco (JTA) — "While
there are some disagreements,
they are minimal compared to the
broad range of cooperation that
exists among blacks. and Jews,"
National Urban League
president, John E. Jacob, declared
at the annual plenary session of
the National Jewish Community
Relations Advisory Council
(NJCRAC) in San Francisco this
week.
Albert Vorspan, vice president
of the Union of American Hebrew
Congregations, (UAHC), a long
time civil rights and intergroup
activist, shared the platform with
Jacob and also shared many of
Jacob's views.
"Almost alone . . . the Jewish
community has largely stood by
the black struggle for equality,
joining us in trying to make
America work for all," Jacob said
at a session on "Black-Jewish Re-
lations: Do our Paths Now Con-
verge?"
- He declared: "In Congress, we see
black and Jewish legislators
working together on an agenda
that included broadening oppor-
tunities for the disadvantaged,
support for Israel, and opposition
to racism in South Africa. We find
black and Jewish social welfare
agencies cooperating to make our
inner cities better places. We find
blacks voting for Jewish candi-
dates and Jews voting for black
candidates."
"So I cannot accept the popular
myth that our two communities
are in a state of cold war," Jacob
concluded, saying, "I reject the
concept that there are differences
between black and Jews."
The black leader called on the
Jewish community to "help fight"

fo a "full employment policy, for
policies that create opportunities
for the poor, for social programs
that open doors to those locked
into poverty and disadvantage."
He applauded the NJRAC for
endorsing such programs in its
annual Joint Program Plan which
is used as a guide for program
planning by its constituent agen-
cies.
"In the past," Jacob told the
NJRAC delegates, "the Jewish
community has been at the foref-
ront of the fight for a better
society." "Building a socially just
America must be at the core of the
Jewish community's concerns in
the future, as well," he said.
Vorspan, giving a Jewish-
community perspective, recalled
the productive past cooperation
between blacks and Jews in the
civil rights struggle while he
forcefully attacked the Adminis-
tration for "using a rigged deficit
as a wrecking ball to destroy the
structure of social justice in
America."
In another speech; U.S. Rep.
David Obey (D-Wis.) said conflict-
ing pressures between ties to a
"valuable ally" and budgetary
constraints will have to be
bridged in order to secure Con-
gressional passage of the in-
. creased U.S. aid Israel , needs for
its economic recovery.
The Wisconsin Democrat em-
phasized that there is "a biparti-
san consensus" on viewing Israel
as a friend and an ally with a "spe-
cial relationship" with the United
States. "America is bound to Is-
rael by shared culture, values and
national interest," he said as he
spoke on "U.S.-Israeli Relations
and the Israeli Economy."

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Weizman Sees Israel's
Arabs As Top Priority

Jerusalem (JTA) — Ezer
Weizman, a Minister-Without-
Portfolio in charge of dealng with
Israel's Arab population, is mak-
ing equal rights for the country's
700,000 Arab citizens his top
priority.
To achieve his objective, he is
probing the attitudes of Arab Is-
raelis, especially school-age
youngsiers: How do they feel
about living in a Jewish state?
What inequities do they perceive?
.- What is their feeling toward their-
fellow Arabs in the administered
territories of the West Bank and
Gaza Strip?
Last Thursday, Weizman, who
served, as Defense Minister in the
first Likud-led government of
Premier Menachem Begin and
now heads the Yahad faction in
the Labor-Likud unity coalition
government, visited Arab villages
in the "triangle" area between
Afula in the north and Petach
Tikvah in the south. It is one of
the most heavily Arab-populated
regions of Israel.
He was warmly greeted by local
residents and public figures alike,
some of the latter leaders of the
opposition Democratic Front for
Peace which is associated with the
Rakah Communist Party. Chat-
ting with students at the junior
high school in Tira village, Weiz-

man said, "I feel uncomfortable
when I hear Arabchildren saying
they do not feel they enjoy equal
rights in Israel."
Weizman stressed the need to
reach out toward the Arab popu-
lation, especially in everyday
matters. But he said he was well
aware of the political complexities
of some 700,000 Arabs living
within Israel's borders.
"Anybody who believes there
are no emotional links between
the Arabs of Eretz Israel and the
Arabs of Judea and Samaria and
those in the Arab countries should
think: Just as -we feel solidarity
with the Jews throughout the
world, there is a similar feeling
here," Weizman said.
A young woman student asked
Weizman why the state has not
lived up to its commitment in its
Declaration of Independence as-
suring equal rights to all citizens.
"There is a feeling among stu-
dents," Weizman said after his
visit, "Why is this school so and
why is another school otherwise?
Why is the budget here so and the
budget elsewhere different?
"Anybody who believes that
there are no problems that should
be given special attention had
better come to Tira and hear a few
things from its high school stu-
dents."

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