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The University of Michigan Library provides access to these materials for educational and research purposes. These materials may be under copyright. If you decide to use any of these materials, you are responsible for making your own legal assessment and securing any necessary permission. If you have questions about the collection, please contact the Bentley Historical Library at bentley.ref@umich.edu

February 15, 1985 - Image 31

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1985-02-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE DETROIT JEWISH, NEWS

mom

• Expert Knitting Lessons, Yarns, Etc.
• Custom Patterns & Designs
• Hand Made Sweaters & Finishings

Thinking about taking the ACT or SAT test? Indi-
vidualized instruction is now available so you can
improve your score.

Jerusalem Is
Largest City

Tel Aviv (JTA) — Jerusalem,
with a population of 428,000 ac-
cording to the latest census, has
outstripped Tel Aviv as Israel's
largest city.
The Central Bureau of Statis-
tics reported that the census of
population and housing con-
ducted in the summer of 1983
showed that the population of
Jerusalem had increased by 36
percent since the last census, in
1972. Tel Aviv grew by ten per-
cent in the same period, and
Haifa, Israel's third largest city,
by only three percent. The popula-
tion of the country as a whole in-
creased by 28 percent.
According to the report,
Jerusalem's Jewish population
grew by 33 percent between
1972-1983 for a total of 306,000.
The non-Jewish population rose
by 47 percent. There are 122,400
non-Jews in Jerusalem compris-
ing 28.5 percent of the population.
Moslems are the largest non-
Jewish group, numbering 108,500
or 88.7 percent of non-Jews. There
are 13,700 Christians.
The Moslem population in-
creased by 51 percent and the
Christian population by 17 per-
cent in the period reviewed.

THE KNITTING NOOK

ACT-SAT Testing

NEWS

WEST BLOOMFIELD PLAZA

6666 Orchard Lake Rd.

Call 398-0116 after 4 P.M.

851-8188

Also tutoring in all subjects (your home)

I NO NEEDLE

NO SCARRING
NO SWELLING
I
g
OR REDNESS'
SAFE & OUCHLESS •

— —

I HAIR REMOVAL

Hairline

I

Eyebrows

Permanently remove unwanted
hair from any part of the body
1 with harmless-painless radio
1 frequency energy without
•• discomfort.
I • Wax treatments available
Legs, bikini line, arching, etc.
I
I • Senior Citizen Discount

I

Face

Lips

FREE

15 minute hair
removal session

1

No Obligation

SEE MACHON L'TORAH AD

pg.

Advanced HAIR REMOVAL Clinic

I

2187 Orchard Lk. Rd. • W. Blmfd. • By Appt. phone • 333-3360 • Hrs.: M-F 8 a.m.-8 p.m., Sat.
North of Square Lake and West of Telegraph
MN Elm MEM MI
NM MO In NM MIN
MI

29 States
Penalize Ethnic
Vandalism

Palm Beach (JTA) — Laws
penalizing ethnic vandalism and
intimidation have been adopted
by 29 states, according to the
Anti-Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith (ADL).
The ADL said 21 states have
passed such measures since 1981
when heightened public concern
developed about substantial in-
creases in incidents of anti-
Semitic vandalism recorded by
ADL's annual audits.
The report was presented by
Seymour Reich at a session of the
ADL's national executive com-
mittee meeting in Palm Beach
this week. Reich, chairman of
ADL's Civil Rights Committee,
said that five states — Illinois, In-
diana, Louisiana, Massachusetts
and Pennsylvania — patterned
the language of their bias crime
measures on a model bill drafted
by ADL in 1981 as part of a com-
prehensive program of counterac-
tion.
Incidents of anti-Semitic van-
dalism have declined substan-
tially since the 1981 peak of 974
— 829 in 1982, 670 in 1983, 715 in
1984, the ADL said.

The United Jewish Appeal set a
new peacetime record by collect-
ing $367.6 million in cash in
calendar 1984, it was announced
by UJA national chairman Alex
GrassVTA) — The figure shows
an increase of $41 million over the
$326.6 million collected in 1983.
In December alone, $101.2 mil-
lion was collected making it one of
the most successful cash months
in UJA history, Grass said.

11.1

'

53

.04

Order Advance Tickets



for

THE PRECIOUS LEGAcy

Judaic Treasures from The Czechoslovak State Collections

The Detroit Institute of Arts

N/Irch 13 - May 5, 1985

what their owners wanted them
to be: links in a chain of conti-
nuity, beauty and faith. So long
as we treasure these things, the
people who loved them can never
be extinct.

The Detroit Institute of Arts is
the exclusive Midwestern site of
The Precious Legacy, a collection
of artwork rescued from the Nazis
at the end of the war. This land-
mark exhibition presents the work
of distinguished scholars from
Czechoslovakia and the United
States. The vitality and crea-
tivity of Czech Jewish life is
celebrated in objects reflecting a
religious and cultural heritage
that extends b'ack to the Middle
Ages and represents virtually
every medium of folk and fine
arts. The treasures have become

The Precious Legacy is organized by the Smithsonian
Institution Traveling Exhibition Service (RIES), in
cooperation with Project Judaica, the Ministry of
Culture of the Czech Socialist Republic, the Federal
Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Czechoslovak
Socialist Republic, the National - Committee of the
Capital of Prague, and the State Jewish Museum in
Prague. The national corporate sponsor of the exhi-
bition is Philip Morris Incorporated.

Sections of a Grill for the Bimah
(Reader's Desk)
Prague, second half of the 18th century
Wrought iron

ORDER FORM

Please print

Number of Tickets:

Name

_Adults $3.75 days
$4.75 evenings

Founders ID #

Address

_Seniors $2.25 days
$3.25 evenings

City/State/Zip

New York

5 p.m.

MAVIS

CHALLENGING
AMERICAN JEWRY

INTRODUCTORY OH-ER

Chin

15, 1945 31
,
.,Fri. day„Febryary

(Eve)
Phone (Day)
Date Selection:
Tues. - Sun., Mar. 13 - May 5, 1985

1st

. Choice

2nd
Choice

3rd
Choice

Time Selection: Half-hour intervals
9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., Tuesdays through
Sundays. Evenings 4:30 to 8 p.m.,
Wednesday & Thursday only (Closed
Mondays).

1st
Choice

2nd
Choice

3rd
Choice

_Students $2.25 days
$3.25 evenings

=$

_Children (12 & under)
Days free, $1 eve. =$

_Founders Days free, $1 eve. =$

Processing charge for all orders =$ 1.50

Total amount of order.

Related Activities: Films, concerts,
lectures, Wednesday Candlelight
Suppers and group tours are available
during the run of the exhibition. Over-
the-counter ticket sales begin Tuesday,
January 29. For further information
contact Ticket Office, DIA
(313) 832-2730.

❑ Send me an informational brochure
and a related activities ticket order form.

Full payment must accompany order.
Make check payable' to:
Ticket Office, DIA

Mail orders, including self-addressed, stamped envelope to:
Ticket Office, DIA • 5200 Woodward Avenue • Detroit, MI 48202.9959

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