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February 08, 1985 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1985-02-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

10 Friday, February 8, 1985

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

LOCAL NEWS

PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS
OF THE FOOT AND ANKLE

Soviet Proxy

Continued from Page 1

WE ARE PLEASED TO ANNOUNCE
THE OPENING OF OUR NEW OFFICE AT:
24601 Coolidge
(S. of 10 Mile Rd.)
Oak Park, MI
543-3555

R ichard Snyder

Enter the
Maxwell HouseCoffee
Israel Sweepstakes

Alex and Milla Prutkov join their daughter Ilana and Lowell
Friedman on the bimah.

This could be your year in Jerusalem.

IFDAILM AM, TO LONDON OR ROME.
CONNECTING JET TO ISRAEL.
PLUS $1,000 CASH.

Maxwell House Coffee, a tradition in
Jewish homes for over a, half a cen-
tury, is offering you a chance to win
a trip to Israel, the cradle of Jewish
history.
Win our Sweepstakes and we'll
give you $1,000 in cash, fly you and

your spouse or a companion on a Pan
Am 747 to London or Rome, and then
to Israel for the most glorious, emo-
tion-packed and history-filled time of
your life. It can happen to you this
year. But first you have to complete
the entry form and send it in.

Maxwell House.® It's always "Good to the last drop:'

GENERAL F0008

OFFICIAL RULES

1. Each entry must be accompanied by the innerseal from any size jar of MAXWELL
HOUSE° Instant Coffee or a 2" square from the plastic lid of a can of MAXWELL
HOUSE • Ground Coffee or MAXWELL HOUSE " Ground Decaffeinated Coffee OR
the words MAXWELL HOUSE' printed in block letters on a 3" x 5" card. Entries
must be on the Official Entry Blank or a 3" x 5" card and mailed to: Israel
Sweepstakes, General Foods Corporation, P.O. 3660. Grand Central Station.
New York. N.Y. 10163.
2. NO PURCHASE REQUIRED TO ENTER SWEEPSTAKES.
3. Entries must be first-class mail. one entry per envelope, postmarked no later
than June 1, 1985.
4. Winner will be selected in a random drawing, on June 22, 1985, from all entries
received prior to the deadline. The drawing will be conducted by Joseph Jacobs
Organization, Inc., an independent organization whose decision is final. In the
event the winner declines the prize or if for any reason the prize cannot be
awarded after the initial drawing, a supplemental drawing(s) will be held to
award the prize. Winner will be notified by mail. Taxes on the prize are the sole
responsibility of the winner The odds of winning depend on the number of
entries received.
5. Prize consists of round trip airfare for two via Pan Am to London or Rome and
connecting let to Tel Aviv, Israel. plus 51.000 in cash. Retail value is 52.200.00.
Prizes are not substitutable, transferable or exchangeable.
5. This sweepstakes is open to all residents of the United States who are 18 years of
age or older. except employees (and their families) of General Foods Corpora-
tion, its advertising agencies. subsidiaries or affiliates, or Joseph Jacobs Orga-
nization. Inc., Sweepstakes subject to all Federal. Slate and local regulations.
Void where prohibited by law.
7. For the name of the winner, send a self-addressed, postage-paid envelope to
Winner's Name, P.O. Box 3990, Grand Central Station, New York, N.Y. 10163.

ISRAEL SWEEPSTAKES

OFFICIAL ENTRY FORM

Name
Address
City
State

Zip

MAIL TO: Israel Sweepstakes
P.O. Box 3660
Grand Central Station,
New York, N.Y. 10163

(c) 1985 Genera l Foods Co rporation

FLY

sustained serious liver dam-
age. He is expected to be put on
trial soon for "disseminating
anti-Soviet agitation."
"In layman's terms," said
Jerry Rogers of the Detroit
Committee, "anti-Soviet agi-
tations means telling the
truth." Rogers and Alex Prut-
kov believe the Soviet officials
did not want Prutkov avail-
able to testify on behalf of
Mesh at the.upcoming trial.
The Prutkovs had been de-
nied permission to emigrate
despite the fact that his par-
ents, Arkady and Sima Prut-
kov, and his brother-in-law
and sister, David and Lud-
milla Sirota, came to Detroit
in 1978.
Alex was part of the Jewish
cultural movement, teaching
Hebrew to fellow Jews in Rus-
sia. The official reason that
they could not leave the
U.S.S.R. was that Alex had
served in the Soviet military
and "might" be aware of state
secrets.
The Berenfeld family has
been blocked through differ-
ent means. Benjamin's father,
Mark, was told they do not
have close relatives in Israel to
warrant emigration. Unoffi-
cially, Benjamin's
grandparents have withheld
permission for their daughter,
Benjamin's mother, to leave.
Mark Berenfeld is part of the
Moscow Scientific Seminar,
composed of refuseniks meet-
ing weekly in an effort to keep
current their scientific knowl-
edge. The group recently ap-
pealed to the European Physi-
cal Society to meet in Moscow
to focus attention on their
plight.
How does Lowell Friedman
react to the swirling intrigues
of the Soviet Union intruding
on this momentous day in his
life?
"Ilana was bat mitzvah in

Russia," he told The Jewish
News. "She should have a turn
here, to see how it feels." And
Lowell has not been sharing
all the attention this week —
on Monday he celebrated his
13th birthday at Hillel Day
School by being called up to
read the Torah.
Dr. Melvyn and Susan
Friedman, Lowell's parents,
are proud of Lowell's attitude.
"It is a mitzvah," says Susan.
"There is so little that we can
actually do for Soviet Jewry.
But for us, the Prutkovs are a
symbol. The more letters
that go to Russia, the better it
is. If the refuseniks don't get
the letters, the Russian gov-
ernment will. If not the gov-
ernment, then the KGB. At
least they will know that we
are watching."
After Cindy Friedman's bat
mitzvah at B'nai. Moshe in
November 1982, the first time
a bar or bat mitzvah was twin-
ned at B'nai Moshe with a
Russian youngster, the
Friedmans celebrated with a
trip to Israel. "Cindy was
asked by a rabbi about her bat
mitzvah," said Susan, "and
she got up and talked about
her twinning." The Friedmans
also telephoned the Israeli
aunt of Cindy's twin, "which
helped complete the triangle
for us. It really means some-
thing for us."
That meaning will carry
forward Saturday morning
when Ilana Prutkov of Odessa
and Oak Park joins Lowell
Friedman on the bimah. Cindy
Friedman will read a transla-
tion of liana's brief remarks in
Russian.
Ilana will describe how she
and her Jewish friend were
discriminated against in
school and called "killers" by
their classmates during dis-
cussions of the Lebanon War.
She will ask Jewish youth to

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