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January 25, 1985 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1985-01-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

/-

Rear Entrance Riles Retarded

8

Scholars Utilize Telephone Talmud

25

Russian Jewish Violinist Is Free At Last

88

Jerry Lewis Trades Fantasy For Spring Training

44

THE JEWISH NEWS

.

THIS ISSUE 40c

JANUARY 25, 1985

SERVING DETROIT'S METROPOLITAN JEWISH COMMUNITY

2,000 Ethiopian Jews
Have Died in Sudan

But Sudan's
president now says all
refugees are free to
leave — provided
they do not go to
Israel.

New York (JTA) — Israeli and
American Jewish officials active on
behalf of Ethiopian Jewry had no
comment this week on reports that at
least 2,000 Ethiopian Jews have died
in refugee camps in the eastern Sudan
since they began to flee their home-
- land last spring.
The reports, carried in the . New
York Times, quoted Sudanese officials
and relief workers as estimating that

CLOSE-UP

perhaps 2,000 more have been
stranded in the Sudan since Israel was
forced to cease its airlift of Ethiopian
Jews earlier this month after prema-
ture disclosure of the operation ap-
peared in the Israeli and international
media.
Reports from the Sudan said that
at one camp, Umm Rekuba, nearly
1,800 of the 7,000 Ethiopian Jews who
arrived last year died there, many of
measles. In July and August, the camp
reportedly went without food and
water for three weeks.
Relief workers said the Ethiopian
Jews who began to flock into Sudanese
camps in large numbers last spring
and early summer were in the "worst
state of any of the refugees."
Some 2,000 Jews are reported to
be camped near the Sudanese-
Ethiopian border, where the Sudanese
officials are preventing entry.

Continued on Page 20

By TEDD SCHNEIDER

Staff Writer

The seven anti-Semitic incidents
) reported in Michigan during 1984 re-
present a decrease from the nine
/ occurrences reported the year before
' \ _ and a return to pre-1983 levels, accord-
ing to Dick Lobenthal, executive direc-
> for of the Michigan Region, Anti-
Defamation League of B'nai B'rith

Births

71

Classified Ads

74

Editorials

4

Engagements

67

Obituaries

87

Purely Commentary

2

Danny Raskin

47

Singles

62

Synagogues

59

Women's News

53

(ADL). The Michigan figures were re-
leased last week with statistics for the
rest of the United States in the ADL's
annual audit of anti-Semitic van-
dalism and other assaults or threats
against Jews.
While the survey showed a mod-
erate increase in such incidents
nationwide, Michigan and other Mid-
western states continued to buck the
national trend of the past few years by
reporting a decline in acts of hatred.
The 1983 survey had shown a decline
in every region of the country except
the Midwest.
Lobenthal feels that the varia-
tions of Michigan are due largely to
the severity of the recent recession and
the somewhat slower economic re-
covery in the Midwest. "A higher un-
employment rate means an increase in
racially or religiously motivated vio-
lence as well as violence in general,"
the ADL executive director said. "In
1983, the figures dropped in almost

Continued on Page 28

NEWS at 11

TV newsman Murray Feldman
has found the trappings
of Detroit's Jewish
community very welcome.

BY SUSAN WELCH

See Story on Page 14

Be nyas-Kaufm a n

Anti-Semitism In State
Drops, U.S. Figures Up

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