100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

The University of Michigan Library provides access to these materials for educational and research purposes. These materials may be under copyright. If you decide to use any of these materials, you are responsible for making your own legal assessment and securing any necessary permission. If you have questions about the collection, please contact the Bentley Historical Library at bentley.ref@umich.edu

January 18, 1985 - Image 26

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1985-01-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

26

Friday, January 18, 1985

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

DR. BRUCE S. SHERIZEN

DENTISTRY FOR ADULTS AND CHILDREN

BEACON SQUARE MEDICAL VILLAGE
21701 W. ELEVEN MILE RD., SUITE 11
SOUTHFIELD, MICHIGAN 48076

BARRY'S
LETS RENT
IT

PARTY RENTALS
ALL OCCASIONS

OFFICE HOURS BY APPOINT. TELEPHONE
(313) 353-5585
INCLUDING
SUNDAYS & EVENINGS (313) 968-9592

I 855-0480

29212 ORCHARD LAKE RD.
South of 13 Mlle

LINDEN

HOME HEALTH CARE

WE WILL DELIVER TO YOUR
HOME THE FINEST IN HOME
HEALTH SUPPLIES. SET-UP
AND INSTRUCTIONS ARE INCLUDED.

HOME

0

WE HAVE HEALTH CARE PROFESSIONALS —
NURSES & THERAPISTS — ON
STAFF TO AID YOU IN THE SELECTION
OF THE PROPER EQUIPMENT & USE.

HEALTH

0 —

WE CARE FOR OUR PATIENTS
AND — MOST IMPORTANTLY —
WE CARE ABOUT OUR PATIENTS

CARE

OSTOMY
OXYGEN
WHEELCHAIRS
HOSPITAL BEDS
WALKERS/CANES
BEDSIDE COMMODES
AND MANY OTHER ITEMS

VISIT OUR SHOWROOM
21120 GREENFIELD
OAK PARK 48237

OR CALL

968-5000

WE BILL INSURANCE DIRECTLY ON COVERED GOODS & SERVICES

HILLEL DAY SCHOOL

come share the experience

where students learn in an environment of
community and tradition, challenge and
innovation. We offer a complete English
and Hebrew program for grades K-9 in a
natural atmosphere of living JUdaism.

Please join us at our annual

Open House

on

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 30, 1985

7:30 p.m. Reception
8:00-9:30 p.m. Program

at

Hittet Day School

32200 Middlebelt, Farmington Hills, MI 48018

851-2394

For parents of children entering Kindergarten or 1st Grade - Fall 1985

No child will be denied an education at Hillel because of parents inability to
pay the full charges. Tuition allowances will continue to be granted on
individual needs. Hillel Day School of Metropolitan Detroit admits Jewish
children of any race, color, national or ethnic origin. Its admission and
scholarship programs are non discriminatory.

Israelis are 'pampered,'
told to cut spending

Tel Aviv (JTA) — Israelis, who
often describe themselves as the
most heavily taxed people in the
world are also the most "pam-
pered,"• according to Finance
Minister Yitzhak Modai. They
must be prepared to accept a dras-
tic reduction in their standard of
living, he told a meeting of the
Engineers Club here.
Modai said the government
aims to reduce living standards to
the level of 1980 which would be
"decent" but not "comfortable" in
order to implement the massive
budget cuts necessary for eco-
nomic recovery. He admitted that
the cuts he seeks have not yet
been effected.The Israel govern-
ment carries a burden comparable
to a country with six times the
population, he said. No other
country in the world has one quar-
ter of its population in productive
enterprises and more than one-
third in service jobs, Modai de-
clared. In no other country does
the public pay less than 20 per-
cent of its total expenditures for
health and education.
Modai noted that Israelis visit
doctors five times more frequently
than Western Europeans and use
four times as much medication
per capita.
Meanwhile, employees of the
government-owned Israel Ship-
yards held a mass meeting Sun-
day to protest plans to reduce the
800-member workforce by half
because of lack of orders.
In a related development, Pre-
mier Shimon Peres began consul-
tations last week on a new eco-
nomic package deal to take effect
when the three-month wage-price
freeze instituted last November
expires three weeks from now.
The Treasury and Histadrut of-
ficials are working on various
plans and the Bank of Israel is
preparing for a law that will for-
bid the government to print new
currency to cover its deficit —
forcing it indirectly to reduce
spending.
Israelis, meanwhile, had the in-
creasingly rare experience of
hearing some good economic news
this week. The Central Bureau of
Statistics reported a 29 percent
improvement in the country's
balance of trade last year, revers-
ing a two year trend. The trade
deficit in 1984 amounted to $2.5
billion compared to $3.5 billion in
1983.
The Ministry of Commerce and
Industry reported Tuesday that
Israel's industrial exports rose by
16.6 percent last year after two
years of stagnation. And the Cen-
tral Bureau of Statistics annouced
at the same time that there was no
rise in the price index during the
last two weeks of December.
Modai has expressed concern
that the freeze policy would mean
continuation of massive govern-
ment subsidies to preserve the
price levels of controlled items.
The government printed about
160 million shekels last month to
cover the cost of its subsidies.
Modai likens this to a fire under
a pressure cooker which eventu-
ally will blow the lid off. He feels
also that reduced inflation during
the freeze period will be wasted
without an agreement for further
cuts in the state budget.
Histadrut Secretary General

Yisrael Kessar came up with a
proposal to compensate workers
for rising prices of subsidized
items without passing the in-
creases on to the consumer price
index and the cost-of-living index.
The effect of his proposal, if ac-
cepted by the government and the
manufacturers, would be to break
the sequence of automatic price
and wage linkage, the main ele-
ment of the inflationary spiral.
Meanwhile, Israel's Minister of
Economic Planning, Gad Yaacobi,
expressed optimism that Israel
will eventually resolve its eco-
nomic crisis, but he warned that
the road to recovery is long and
painful.

Detente may
benefit Jews
in Soviet Union

Paris (JTA) — The Jewish
communities of Western • Europe
believe that detente and improved
relations between East and West
could benefit Soviet Jews.
A joint appeal to that effect was
presented to a senior American
diplomat attending the U.S.-
Soviet arms talks in Geneva last
week by Claude Kelman of
France, co-president of the Euro-
pean Conference for Soviet Jews,
it was disclosed here.
The appeal was signed by
representatives of Jewish com-
munities in Switzerland, Britain,
France, Sweden, Denmark, Nor-
way, Holland, Luxembourg, Bel-
gium, Spain and Greece.
It stated that these 11 Jewish
communities believe that "a re-
newed detente and a better inter-
national understanding would
help imprOve the condition of
Soviet Jewry," The U.S. was
urged at the same time to con-
tinue its efforts to help the perse-
cuted Jews in the USSR.
Meanwhile, Secretary of State
George Shultz raised the issue of
Soviet Jewry several times with
Soviet Foreign Minister Andrei
Gromyko during their arms con-
trol talks in Geneva, according to
Mark Palmer, a senior State De-
partment official Shultz sent here
as a special envoy to brief Israeli
officials on the Geneva talks.
Palmer was in Egypt last week to
brief officials in Cairo on the
Geneva talks.
In New York, Avital
Shcharansky has informed Soviet
Jewish activists in the United
States that her mother-in-law,
Ida Milgrom, has been granted
permission to visit her son, Soviet
Jewish prisoner of conscience
Anatoly Shcharansky in the Perm
Labor Camp. The visit was
scheduled last Monday.
Shcharansky is serving a 13-
year sentence after being con-
victed in 1978 on charges of spy-
ing for the United States. Last
November, Soviet authorities told
Mrs. Milgrom that he had been
transferred from a prison near
Moscow to a labor camp in the Ur-
als.
Mrs. Shcharansky said last
month that family sources had
been informed Shcharansky had
been hospitalized, although
Soviet authorities did not provide
details of his illness. .

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan