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November 23, 1984 - Image 21

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1984-11-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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.....8i23.3,22M1323132Zid2r1132323/529131

THE- DETROIT- JEWISH- NEWS- filtthy, November 23, 1964

-

WORKMEN'S CIRCLE BAZAAR '84

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 2nd, 1984
12 P.M.-5 P.M.

"The world is now watching
Ethiopia starve to death," he
said. "Thousands of Jews are
among the dying. The Ethio-
pian Jewish community is fast
becoming exinct. How much
longer can they survive?"
Jacobovici, a student at the
University of Toronto, said
there are now 12,000 Ethio-
pian Jewish refugees in Su-
dan. Moreover, 8,000 Ethio-
pian Jews are victims of the
worst continuing drought in
Africa's hikory. This summer,
he said, 2,000 Jews died and
more that 300 are dying every
month. He quoted as his
sources for this information
The New York Times, The To-
ronto Star and The Jerusalem
Post. He said 6,000 Falashas
still remain in Ethiopia.
He declared, to applause,
"How many more Jews must
die before Ethiopian Jews be-
come the number one priority
at the General Assembly?"
During the week, later ses-
sions of the CJF were told that
Israel has rescued 8,500 of the
Falashas.
In a wide-ranging - speech
Thursday night, former Israeli
President Yitzhak Navon told
the delegates, "One day you
will be astonished at the brav-
ery of the Ethiopian Jews, and
the scope of the rescue work of
Israel and its agencies." But

.

Artukovic facing
extradition following
arrest in L.A.

Los Angeles (JTA) — Andrija
Artukovic, 4he most notorious
Nazi war criminal living in the
United States, was arrested last
Wednesday in Orange County by
federal authorities acting on a
new request for extradition by the
government of Yugoslavia.
Bail was denied for the 84-
year-old resident of Seal Beach,
south of Los Angeles, at a hearing
last Thursday in a crowded prison
ward. He is being held at the
County-University of Southern
California Medical Center.
Artukovic, an alien resident of
California for over 30 years, was
the Minister of Interior and Jus-
tice in the Nazi puppet state of
Croatia during World War II. He
was also in charge of the notorious
Jacenovac concentration camp
and is believed to be responsible
for the murders of 700,000 Serbs,
40,000 Gypsies and 25,000 Jews
in Croatia.
Until the latest development,
Artukovic had successfully
evaded all legal moves against
him since 1951. Neil Sher, direc-
tor of the Justice Department's
Office of Special Investigations,
who was here in connection with
the Artukovic case, said, "We will
pursue this case vigorously with
the hope that Artukovic will be
sent back to Yugoslavia as soon as
possible."

Navon followed the line that
disclosure of specific details of
the rescue operations would
endanger the entire effort.
On other subjects, Navon,
who is Deputy Premier and
Minister of Education and
Culture in the new national
unity government in Israel,
discussed the situation in
Lebanon, Israel's economic
problems, and the peace with
Egypt.
Navon pointed out, how-
ever, that while the unity gov-
ernment is in agreement on
these issues "There are topics
on which we cannot agree —
the West Bank and the Gaza
Strip, the Palestinian issue,
and negotiations with Jor-
dan." But in spite of the dis-
agreement about negotiations
with Jordan, we let it be
known that if there would be
an initiative by King Hussein,
we will discuss that initiative
and not close the door," Navon
said.
However, "I don't see any
political breakthrough in the
Middle East with Egypt or
Jordan. Because of differences
of opinion in the unity gov-
ernment on the ultimate solu-
tion with Jordan, the issue
will remain unsettled."
As for the West Bank set-
tlements, Navon said, "Those
that were agreed to by the
previous (Likuli)s_ government
will be established, but any
new settlements require a
majority. But to get a major-
ity, it is necessary for one.side
to get a vote from the opposi-
tion. This may happen when
the Messiah will come."
Former Secretary of State
Henry Kissinger told the
CJF Saturday night that he
did not believe there is an
opportunity at this time to
make a breakthrough toward
peace in the Middle East and
warned that any attempt to
achieve a comprehensive solu-
tion at this moment will lead
to an extraordinarily difficult
and dangerous situation."
He also emphasized that in-
volving the Soviet Union in
any Middle East negotiations
would make the effort to
achieve peace "infinitely more
difficult." The basic reason for
his skepticism about the pos-
sibility for a breakthrough is
the continuing internecine
warfare between the Arab
states, the domestic turmoil
within the Arab states and the
fear on the part of some Arab
leaders that making peace
with Israel would undermine
their continued existence.
Kissinger said that "simple,
limited arrangements that
can ease the situation are

possible and should be pur-
sued in such areas like the
Gaza Strip and non-strategic
areas of the West Bank, espe-
cially those with heavy Arab
populations, be given the au-
tonomy which was in the
Camp David arrangements
together with military ar-
rangements that would make
surprise attacks by anyone
more difficult."
Kissinger pointed out that
one such successful limited
agreement has existed be-
tween Israel and Syria on the
Golan Heights since 1974. He
said this agreement has never
been violated, even in the
middle of the Lebanese War,
and that the United Nations
force which was established to
keep Israeli and Syrian troops
apart under that arrangement
has had its mandate renewed
every six months at the re-
quest of Syria.
He said that the United
States "has learned that at-
tempting too sweeping an ap-
proach can lead to setbacks
and even humiliation and may
achieve nothing substantial."

Sweatsuits, books, towels, bibs, sta-
tionary, gift wrapping, personalized gifts,
handpainted plastics, crazy socks . . . &
MORE & MORE & MORE!

WORKMEN'S CIRCLE NURSERY SCHOOL
26341 Coolidge, Oak Park

545-0985

Custom Dining Rooms
delivery

DESIGN IT

all colors & styles —
Deal Direct With Manufacturer

Keith Schare, Designer

411-3223 I

48x18x27 $160"
SOFA TABLE

24x22x22

10"

END
TABLE

36x36x16

$140"

COCKTAIL
TABLE

A complete story on other CJF events
will appear in next week's Jewish
News.

YOU ARE CORDIALLY

Chomber of Commerce & noustry

INVITED TO A MEETING

DJd

6985 Woodbank, Birmingham, MI 48010

TO INTRODUCE YOU TO . . .

The Newly Established

METROPOLITAN DETROIT CHAPTER

Of The

AMERICAN-ISRAEL CHAMBER OF
CO-MMERCE & INDUSTRY, INC.

Explore its potential impact on you, your cl;R! Lele,
and Israel's economic crisis

GUEST SPEAKERS:

LLOYD SHEFSKY:

ALON REDLICH:

Past President of the highly successful American-Israel
Chamber of Commerce& Industry/Metropolitan Chicago
Chairperson of Chamber expansion

Professional staff of the Business Department
Department of the Chicago Chamber

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 7:30 PM

FOR RESERVATIONS PLEASE CALL

661-1948

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