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November 16, 1984 - Image 91

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1984-11-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.



THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

PROFESSIONAL / student,
Democrat, 27; Interests: cats,
canoeing, computers, bridge,
political issues, guitar, being
Jewish; Non-Interests: smoking,
drinking, other drugs, casual in-
timacy, being macho; seeks as-
tute woman 26-28. Reply to The
Jewish News, #149. 17515 W. 9
Mile Rd., Suite 865, Southfield,
Mi. 48075.

53—ENTERTAINMENT

FREDDY SHEYER. One man
orchestra. Weddings, Bar-
Mitzvahs, seniors. 661-2357.

VERSATILE sophisticated party
music. All occasions. Call 326-
6995, after 9 p.m.

SPACE AGE

COMPUTER PICTURES

Taken of your guests
at Bar Mitzvas, wed-
dings, promotional
parties, etc.

Call 863-7736
for into

A gui-de for harvest 'bounty' hunters:
try these tasty Thanksgiving treats

BY GLORIA KAUFER GREENE

Each fall, American Jews ex-
press their thankfulness for this
country's abundant selection of
fresh foods by celebrating two joy-
ful harvest festivals. First comes
Succot, which is followed shortly
by Thanksgiving. Actually, some
say that the early Pilgrim settlers
patterned the latter holiday after
the former one.
In some ways, however, modern
Jewish Americans have turned
the tables on the Pilgrims. Many
of us hang cranberries, gourds,
and cobs of dried "Indian" corn in
our Succot, where we dine on stuf-
fed pumpkins and turkeys, as well
as tzimmes made with vegetables
such as winter squash and sweet
potatoes.
Perhaps, that's because we just
can't wait for Thanksgiving to
enjoy all the wonderful foods that
are typically associated with it —
most of them native to the "New
World." Not only do these foods
taste wonderful, but they are also
quite healthful.
Turkey is very high in protein,
yet low in fat. And the orange-
colored vegetables contain abun-
dant amounts of beta-carotene, a
Vitamin A precursor which is said
to help prevent lung cancer. In
fact, just about all vegetables are
high in various vitamins and
minerals, not to mention non-
nutritive fiber.
several
are
Following
Thanksgiving dishes:

THANKSGIVING MENU

Clark Family Players

BIRTHDAY
PARTIES
and other special oc-
casions
juggling,
Clowns,
magic, music, dance,
puppets, balloon
sculpture
Call Mary Ellen
273-6716

55—ART FOR SALE

AST IN TIME FOR HANNAN
Attention: Art collec-
tors, decorators, syn-
agogues. Limited edi-
tion lithographs by
important artists.
Yaacov Agam, Marc
Chagall Chaim Gross,
Moscowitz,
Ira
Shalom of Safed,
Raphael Soyer. Also:
signed Chargall post-
ers and many beauti-
ful important art
books. - Excellent
prices.
Call Ed Ogul,
Paramour Fine Arts
\tow 559-4695

91

COOKING

50A—PEOPLE
CONNECTOR/
PERSONAL

SEND ALL REPLIES TO THE
JEWISH NEWS, 11515 W. NINE
MILE RD. SUITE 865,
SOUTHFIELD, MI. 48015.

'Friday, November 16, 1984

Mixed-Vegetable Stuffing (for
Roast Turkey)
Cranberry Relish
Butternut Squash with White
Beans
Brussels Sprouts with Tarragon
Sauce
Spiced Rutabaga and Apple Cas-
serole
Sweet Potato Pie

MIXED-VEGETABLE STUF-
FING

A food processor can save time
in shredding and chopping the
vegetables.

nonstick spray-coated 6-cup cas-
serole. Sprinkle the bread crumbs
on top; then dot with the remain-
ing 1 tablespoon margarine cut
into small pieces. Cover the dish
with a lid or foil.
Bake in a preheated 350-degree
oven for 35 minutes. Then remove
the cover, and continue baking
about 10 maiutes longer or until
the apples are very tender. Makes
6 to 8 servings.
(Note: This may be assembled
ahead, and baked just before serv-
ing. If the turkey is being roasted
at 325-degrees, the casserole may
be baked at this temperature for
about 15 minutes longer than
indicated above.)

BRUSSELS SPROUTS
WITH TARRAGON SAUCE

margarine; then- cook the onion
until tender but not browned. Add
the potatoes, turnips, carrots, and
cabbage, and stir constantly
about 1 minute. Then add the re-
maining ingredients, cover the
pot tightly, and reduce the heat to
low.
Steam the vegetable mixture
about 5 minutes, stirring occa-
sionally, or until the vegetables
are well mixed and heated
through. (If they seem to be very
dry and are sticking to the bottom
of the pot, add a few tablespoons of
water.)
Remove the vegetable mixture
from the heat, and cool it slightly.
Use the slotted spoon to transfer
the vegetable stuffing into the
body and neck cavities of a turkey
or other fowl; then roast the poul-
try as desired.
Or, transfer the mixture to a
greased or nonstick spray-coated
2-quart casserole dish, and bake,
covered, in a 325-degree to 350-
degree oven for about 30 minutes.
Then remove the covering, and
bake about 20 to 30 minutes
longer or until all the vegetables
are tender.
Makes enough vegetable stuf-
fing for an approximately 14-
pound turkey, or about 8 side-dish
servings.

3 tbsps. pareve margarine
1 large onion, finely chopped
2 medium-sized, thin-skinned
potatoes, scrubbed and
shredded (or 1 large bak-
ing potato, peeled and
shredded)
2 medium-sized turnips, peeled
and shredded
carrots,
4 medium-sized
shredded
1/2 small green or Savoy cab-
bage, shredded
1 1/2 cups frozen loose-pack
corn kernels, slightly
thawed
1 /4 cup finely chopped fresh
parsley leaves
1 tsp. dried basil leaves
1 /4 tsp. dried thyme leaves
1/2 tsp. salt
Vs to VI tsp. black pepper, pref-
erably freshly ground
1 /2 cup chicken - bouillon or
broth (or vegetable bioth)
2 tbsps. imitation bacon bits
(optional)
In a large pot or Dutch oven
over medium-high heat, melt the

CRANBERRY RELISH

Unlike cranberry sauce, this
slightly tart relish requires no
cooking. It is quickly made in a
food processor or in batches in
blender. If neither of these are
available, all the ingredients can
be put through a food grinder.

1 medium-sized orange, pref-
erably navel
1 12-ounce package (3 cups)
fresh cranberries, rinsed,
drained and sorted.
1 medium-sized apple, cored
and cut into eighths (peel-
ing is not necessary)
'1 medium-sized pear, cored
and cut into eighths (peel-
ing is not necessary)
1 /4 cup walnut or pecan pieces
1/4 cut raisins or dried currants
1 /2 cup packed dark brown
sugar
2 tbsps. granulated white
sugar (or to taste)
1 tbsp. lemon juice

Use a vegetable peeler or sharp
knife to remove the thin, colored
part of the peel from the orange;
reserve. Peel off and discard all
the white pith from the orange;
then cut the orange in chunks.
Put the orange peel and chunks
in the food processor (or blender)
with the remaining relish ingre-
dients, and pulse-process the mix-
ture until the ingredients are very
finely chopped but not smoothly
pureed. If necessary, chop the in-
gredients in batches; then com-
bine all the batches and mix well.
Chill the relish a least several
hours or overnight, stirring occa-
sionally, until the sugar has com-
pletely dissolved and the flavors
have had a chance to mingle.
Serve with turkey. Makes about
3 1/2 cups.

SPICED RUTABAGA
AND APPLE CASSEROLE

5 cups peeled and diced
rutabagas (about 2 1/4
pounds)
1 cup water
1 tbsp. honey
3 cups peeled and finely diced
apples (3 large ones)
1 tbsp. lemon juice
3 tbsps. packed dark brown
sugar, divided
1 /4 tsp. ground cinnamon
Vs tsp. ground nutmeg
2 tbsps. margarine, divided
1 /4 cup bread crumbs or crum-
bled dry unsweetened
breakfast cereal, such as
corn flakes
In a 2-quart saucepan, combine
the rutabagas, water, and honey.
Cover the pan tightly, and bring
to a boil over medium-high heat.
Reduce the heat, and simmer the
rutabagas about 25 minutes or
until very tender.
Meanwhile, mix the apples
with the lemon juice, 1 tablespoon
brown sugar, cinnamon and nut-
meg. Set aside.
When the rutabagas are tender,
drain them well. Transfer the
rutabagas to a bowl, and mash
them coarsely. Stir in 1 table-
spoon margarine until it is
melted. Then add the remaining 2
tablespoons brown sugar.
Mix the seasoned apples with
the rutagabas. Turn out the mix-
ture into a lightly greased or

1 1/4 pounds fresh Brussels spr-
outs, stem ends trimmed
and a shallow "X" in the
base of each one for more
even cooking (or 1 10-
ounce package frozen
Brussels sprouts)

Sauce
1 tbsp. margarinel1/2 tbsps.
enriched all-purpose or
unbleached white flour
1 cup seasoned chicken broth
or bouillon, preferably hot
1/2 tsp. dried tarragon leaves
1 tsp. prepared Dijon-style
mustard
1 tbsp. cider vinegar
In a steamer set above some
simmering water, or in a
medium-sized saucepan contain-
ing about 1 inch of water, steam
the Brussels sprouts until they
are just tender, but not at all
mushy, about 8 to 15 minutes.
Meanwhile, prepare the sauce.
In a small saucepan over
medium-high heat, melt the mar-
garine. Add the flour, and stir
constantly, peferably with a wire
whisk, for 1 minute.
Then gradually mix in the
broth, tarragon, mustard, and
vinegar, and continue stirring
until the sauce thickens and
comes to a boil. Reduce the heat,
and simmer the sauce for 1 min-
ute. If necessary, keep the sauce
warm over very low heat, stirring
often, until it is needed.
When the Brussels sprouts are
tender, immediately remove them
from the heat, and drain off any
cooking liquid. Transfer the Brus-
sels sprouts to a serving dish, and
top with the sauce. Stir gently so
that all the Brussels sprouts are
coated with some of the sauce.
Makes 5 to 6 servings.

BUTTERNUT SQUASH
AND WHITE BEANS

1 1/2 tbsps. margarine
1 medium-sized onion, finely
chopped
2 garlic cloves, minced
1 medium-sized butternut
squash (1 1 74 2 to 2 pounds),
peeled, seeded and cut into
1/2-inch cubes
1 /4 cup water (or more if needed
during cooking)
2 15- to 16-ounce cans white
beans, drained (or 3 cups

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