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November 09, 1984 - Image 30

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1984-11-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

WW/embrn011 T E DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

EDITH GLADSTONE

DRY CLEANING PLANT IN OAK PARK
Has extra Production Time and will accept
an independent route. If you are unhappy
where you are.
CALL

Wants to thank
her many friends
and relatives for
their kindness dur-
ing her illness.

545-1300

ASK FOR DWAYNE

VP Did Your Bank Pay You
This Much Interest
This Week?


FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS

MONEY MARKET RATES

Franklin Savings

INTEREST
RATE
UPDATE
AS OF

9.75%

Bloomfield Savings
Comerica
Detroit & Northern
Empire of America
First Federal of Michigan
First of America
Manufacturers
Michigan National of Detroit
National Bank of Detroit
Standard Federal

8.75
9.00
8.75
9.25
8.50
8.75
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9.00
8.45
8.75

1 1 -6-84

MEMBER

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r,df.tal Sav ■ ncg, & town In..uranci•Cor”

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Based on S2.500 minimum deposit Higher rates may be available for larger deposits.

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Rate
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Effective annual yield based on deposits for 1 year at current rate. APR rate subject to change. Balances below
$50,000 earn the prevailing money market interest rate. Balances below $2,500 earn 51/4 % interest. In person only
withdrawals permitted. Limited time offer.

Franklin Savings

26336 Twelve Mile Rd. (At Northwestern Highway)

Call Or Come In
For Details Todayf

(313) 356-2102

(I)

BAUME GENEVE
& MERCIER

NEWS

`Election not critical to Jews'

Chicago (JTA) — An American
Jewish Committee official pre-
dicted that the national election
results were unlikely to have a
critical effect on Jewish interests
as long as the political center re-
mained strong. But, he added,
tensions could arise in the Jewish
community if the elections ulti-
mately led to an increase in power
for either "anti-Semitic forces on
the left or Christian fundamen-
talism on the right."

For Jewish voters, said Alfred
Moses, chairman of the AJC's na-
tional executive council, "what
distinguishes the 1984 President-
ial campaign from the campaign
four years ago has been the shift
in focus for Jews from Israel and
Israel-related issues to domestic
concerns.
"Outcroppings
of anti-
Semitism on the Democratic left
and Christian fundamentalism on
the Republican right have
engaged to attention of Jews this
fall far more than the familiar
rhetorical question as to which
candidate would be a better friend
of Israel."

The new executive head of the
American Jewish Committee
called for "an equal partnership",
between Israel and the American
Jewish community, which he said
looks upon America as its home.
"The time has come," Dr. David
M. Gordis told the agency's execu-
tive council, "for the American
Jewish Committee to assert,
without guilt, that we are part of a
proud and self-confident Jewish
community that can and will sur-
vive creatively in this country, in
a constructive and mutually-

enhancing partnership with Is-
rael."
Dr. Gordis, who became execu-
tive vicepresident in July, spoke
at the annual meeting of the top
policy=making body.
Dr. Gordis urged the Jewish
people, in all countries, to re-
evaluate the role of Israel and of
Jewish nationalism "in the pre-
sent reality of Jewish life" so that
the Zionist fold would continue to
include "all those ardent suppor-
ters of Israel who assert its cen-
trality in Jewish life but do not
plan to settle in Israel."
During the meetings in
Chicago, Sen. Lowell Weicker
(R-Conn.) criticzed fundamen-
talists who seek to establish
prayer in the public schools. "I say
to them that in the United States
there is no more traditional value
than separation of church and
state," Weicker said.
Helen Suzman, a member of
South Africa's Parliament and a
long-term opponent of apartheid,
stated that the key to peaceful
change in South Africa rested in
the expansion of its economy for
the benefit of 22 million blacks.
Accepting the AJC's American
Liberties Medallion, Suzman
argued that "those who believe
that total economic collapse
would facilitate a black revolu-
tion and black majority rule."
Such a course, she said, could
only be advocated by people sit-
ting safely thousands of miles
away, for "a black revolution
would have no chance of success,
as anyone who knows anything
about the strength, ferocity and
competence of the South Africa
police will agree."

Brooklyn synagogues torched

: ••••-.4f^.- t

SHOW HER SHE'S
WORTH HER
WEIGHT IN GOLD
AND QUARTZ.

These slender 14K gold,
quartz watches feature
bracelets of hand-woven
gold. Exquisite jewelry from
Baume & Mercier does
more than tell time.

Part of the 'Town Quartz
collection, including styles
with diamonds and other
precious gems.

AIPAC establishes
Kenen Forest

LAWRENCE M. ALLAN

PRESIDENT

NORMAN ALLAN

Founder/Consultant

EStabltshed 1919

AWARDED CERT1F 'CATE BY GIA

IN GRADING & EVALUATION

GEMOLOGIST/DIAMONTOLOGIST

"Retail courtesies at Wholesale Prices"

New York (JTA) — A second
fire in a 48-hour period against a
synagogue in the Bensonhurst
section of Brooklyn left the door to
Talmud Torah Congregation
slightly scorched before it was ex-
tinguished.
The second blaze came after an
explosion and fire early Oct. 31
that gutted the four-story Maple-
ton Park Jewish Center, two
blocks from the Talmud Torah
synagogue. That explosion and
fire were termed arson by the fire
department and led New York
City Police t'Commissioner Ben-
jamin Ward to form a 20-man task
force to investigate the incidents.
The New York Jewish Commu-
nity Relations Council offered a
$5,000 reward for _information
leading to the arrest and convic-
tion of those found guilty in the
Mapleton Park Jewish Center
arson attack. The center had

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Phone: 642-5575

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Washington — The American
Israel Public Affairs Committee
(AIPAC) has established the I.L.
Kenen Forest in the American In-
dependence Park near Jerusalem.
Kenen, 79, is the founder and
first executive director of AIPAC,
a pro-Israel organization regis-
tered to lobby the Congress on be-
half of close U.S.-Israel relations.

housed 75 pupils and a
synagogue.
On Sunday, some 1,000 people
including New Jersey Governor
Thomas Kean participated in an
interfaith rally and demonstra-
tion of solidarity that concluded
with clean-up operations at a
synagogue defaced last month
with anti-Semitic slogans and
damaged when a tractor was dri-
ven through the building's side.
Three youths have been ar-
rested for the anti-Semitic attack
on Beth Shalom Synagogue in
Manalapan Township.

Six youths arrested
in cemetery ruin

Bonn (JTA) — Police in the
town of Fulda in the federal state
of Hesse have arrested six youths
who they say desecrated the
Jewish cemetery in the nearby
town of Weyhers late last month.
The youths, aged eight-13, were
questioned by the police and re-
turned to their homes.
Some 90 of the 200 tombstones
in the cemetery were uprooted
and at least 20 of the tombstones
were severely damaged. The six
youths admitted responsibility for
the incident, police said. At least
two of the six had participated in
previous desecrations of the
cemetery last year and again last
summer.

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