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October 05, 1984 - Image 26

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1984-10-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

26

Friday, October 5, 1984

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

NEWS

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OFFER EXPIRES 10-31-84

Peres lashes Hussein rejection
of Middle East peace overture

Jerusalem (JTA) — Israeli
Premier Shimon Peres responded
swiftly and sharply Monday to a
speech by King Hussein to the
Jordanian Parliament rejecting
Israeli peace overtures as "ma-
neuver" and "deception" and vow-
ing that Jordan would not forgo a
single grain of soil in Arab lands
occupied by Israel."
"All who reject peace will even-
tually have to pay the price for
their rejection," Peres declared in
a statement issued shortly after
the Jordanian King spoke in
Amman where parliament re-
opened after its summer recess.
He stressed, however, that Israel
would "continue to believe in
peace and strive for peace" despite
Hussein's negative statements.
Peres has invited Hussein sev-
eral times to enter into peace
talks with Israel without precon-
ditions. Jordan's decision last
week to resume full diplomatic
ties with Egypt, broken when Is-
rael and Egypt signed their peace
treaty in 1979, was widely viewed
as a possible prelude to Jordan
joining the peace process.
But those hopes seemed to be
dashed by Hussein's attack on Is-
rael and the United States. He ac-
cused the latter of contributing to
Israel's obstinacy by procrastina-
tion and hesitation, and its rever-
sal of an earlier decision to sell
Jordan modern weaponry.
Peres declared that contrary to
Hussein's charge, Israel's pro-
posed .peace talks with all of its
neighbors are not a tactical ruse"
because peace is a real and urgent
need for all Mideast nations.
Referring to Hussein's asser-
tion that Joran would not give up
"one grain of our soil" on the West
Bank, not a stone in our mos-
ques, churches and holy places,"
Peres said it was "inconceivable"
that Jordan's conditions for peace
talks are that all of its demands ire
accepted before the talks begin.
Peres reminded Hussein that
Jordan was the aggressor in 1967
"out of the mistaken assumption
that it could force Israel into de-
feat." He observed that there are
no prices for mistakes and no
compensation for aggression.
Peace is not an act of charity.
Either both sides need it or it can-
not be attained."
There was disappointment in
some Israeli government circles
over the harsh, uncompromising
tenor of Hussein's speech, particu-
larly after Israel's new unity gov-
ernment offered peace talks with-
out preconditions. Only Sunday,
Peres expressed "hope" that the
renewed ties between Jordan and
Egypt "will contribute toward the
renewal of the peace process."
But some observers seemed re-
lieved that Hussein's adamancy
has ended, at least for the time
being, a confrontation between
the Labor and Likud components
of the unity government over the
framework of peace talks with
Jordan. Likud insists they must
be based exclusively on the Camp
David accords; the Labor position
is that negotiations with Jordan
need not necessarily be limited by
Camp David.
Last week at the United Na-
tions, President Reagan told the
General Assembly that he is as
committed today to his Sept. 1,

1982 peace initiative as he was on
the day he issued it.
"That initiative remains a
realistic and workable approach.
He said that the foundation of this
pla4 remains Security Council
Resolution 242.
Stressing the importance of
negotiations, Reagan, whose
speech lasted 25 minutes and who
referred to the Middle East only
briefly, said, "The lesson of ex-
perience is that negotiations
work. The peace treaty between
Israel and Egypt brought about
the peaceful return of the Sinai,
clearly showing that the negotiat-
ing process brings results when
the parties commit themselves te,-:
it.
The time is bound to come
when the same wisdom and cour-
age will be applied, with success,
to reach peace between Israel and,
all of its Arab neighbors, in a
manner that assures security f(7
all in the region, the recognition -,
of Israel, and a solution to the
Palestinian problem," he said.

Report Muslim
extremist faction
holds Detroit native

Beirut — Former Detroiter
Jeremy Levin, who was abducted
in Beirut last March, is being held
captive along with a pair of dip-
lomats from the United States
and Saudi Arabia by an under--
ground group, Syrian officials re-
ported this week.
According to Beirut's Al Sharq
newspaper, which has close ties to
the Syrian government, the Saudi
diplomat may be released soon
but there has been no progress in
efforts to release the U.S. dip-
lomat, William Buckley, and Le-
vin, 52, who is the Beirut bureau
chief for the Atlanta-based Cable
News Network.
The Muslim extremist group Is-
lamic Jihad, which said it carried
out the Sept. 20 suicide bombing
of the U.S. Embassy annex in Be- '
irut, has claimed responsibility
for the three kidnappings.

,

Samuel Greenberg
heads national JWV

Washington, D.C. (JTA) —
Samuel Greenberg of Kingston,
Pa., was unanimously elected na-
tional commander of the Jewish
War Veterans of the U.S.A. at the
organization's 89th national con-
vention.
Greenberg, a veteran of WWII,
has been a member of JWV for 38
years. He has served as national
editor of The Jewish Veteran, the
organization's national publica-
tion, for the past five years and as I
a member of the national execu-
tive committee.

Correction

The names of guest speaker
Harry Gunsberg and dinner
committee member Rose Katz
were inadvertantly misspelled in
last week's advertisement for the
Nov. 11 dinner of the Friends of
Israel Cancer Foundation.

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