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September 28, 1984 - Image 140

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1984-09-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

92

Friday, September 28, 1984 THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

40—BUSINESS CARDS

CUSTOM Formica cabinets. Re-
facing cabinets. Drywall. Doors.
Commercal and Residential,
671-8573.

ARON'S PLUMBING-HEATING.
Plumbing repair. New installa-
tion. Electric sewer cleaning.
Sump pumps. 557-6318, 573-
0924.

APPLE PAINTNG
& WALLPAPERING

Quality work at rea-
sonable prices.
References. Free Es-
timates.

50—PEOPLE
CONNECTOR/
PERSONAL

NEWS

SEND ALL REPLIES TO THE
JEWISH NEWS, 11515 W. NINE
MILE RD. SUITE 865,
SOUTHFIELD, MI. 48015.

55 YEAR OLD widow, 5'8",
enjoys dining out, theatre,
movies, travel and museums.
Seeks mature gentleman who
enjoys the same. Photo ap-
preciated. Reply to Jewish News
#132, 17515 W. 9 Mile, South-
field, Mi. 48075.

FREE BOOKLET

A portrait of
psychotherapy.

Call DAVID
661-1403

write to:

William R. Robinson
1 Parklane
Suite 1211 E
Dearborn, Mi. 48126
or call
271.7950

GUTTERS AND
DOWNSPOUTS

New installation or Repair

53—ENTERTAINMENT

Flashing Repairs

Clark Family Players

Free Estimates

MORREY

968-3949 Eves. 352-5384

This Space
Reserved for
Your Ad

Call 424-8833

BIRTHDAY
PARTIES
and other special oc-
casions
Clowns,
juggling,
magic, music, dance,
puppets, balloon
sculpture
Call Mary Ellen
273-6716

COMPLETE
PIANO SERVICE

• Tuning
• Regulating
• Rebuilding
• Refinishing

MAYER GLUZMAN
European Trained Technician

Reasonable Rates
Call anytime: 661-4869

We buy and sell used
pianos

SPACE AGE

PAINTING &
WALLPAPERING

COMPUTER PICTURES

References

BY DIANE ROSENSCHEIN
Special to The Jewish News

Imagine trying to obtain
a census on all the Jewish
educational institutions in
the world, when in most
countries there is no cen-
tralized body that has con-
tact with these institutions.
The Project for Jewish Edu-
cation Statistics, based in
Jerusalem at the Hebrew
University, has undertaken
to do just that.
"We regard this as the
most reliable data base ever
to be produced on this
topic," stressed Prof. Alie
Dubb, the project's director
and a faculty member of the
university's Institute of
Contemporary Judaism.
"This does not mean that it's
an absolutely reliable data
base. But for the first time,
this kind of census is using a
standardized procedure and
questionnaire, processed by
a centralized team."
All Diaspora Jewish
communities which were
known to have Jewish
schools were covered in the
survey. This includes com-
munities in North and
Latin America, western
Europe (including Romania
and Hungary), South Af-
rica, Australia and some
Moslem countries. It is be-
lieved that more than 90
percent of existing Jewish
schools outside Israel were
reached, involving some
540,000 pupils. This statis-
tic covers day and
supplementary schools (af-
ternoon and Sunday) at all
levels, ranging from pre-
school, through secondary
school.

According to Prof. Dubb,
the presumably simple task
of distributing the ques-
tionnaire was enormously
difficult. He noted that in
the United States, for
example, there is no central
register. "In such a large
country," he said, "the phys-
ical task of finding the
schools was enormous.
Therefore, just compiling a
world-wide register of
Jewish educational institu-
tions is in itself a valuable
result of the census."
Another problem was in
defining certain ideological
terms. Prof. Dubb pointed
out one example of this, in
regard to what the word
"sponsor" implied. The term
had different connotations
for differet people: who fi-
nanced the institution, who
founded it, who is responsi-
ble for running it, and to
who it is affiliated.
Principals of all known
Jewish schools received
questionnaires. If the staff
failed in several attempts to
obtain responses, they
sought their information
from other sources. All in
all, about 80 percent of the
questionnaires were com-
pleted and returned. Once
that was accomplished, it
was found that the quality
of the responses was not al-
ways high. Checks for con-
sistency were made, and the
most reliable information
available was obtained.
Since the staff in
Jerusalem could not contact
all the institutions alone,
various local organizations

were called on for help. The
Jewish Educational Serv-
ices of North America, the
Educational Department of
the Board of deputies of
British Jews, the South Af-
rican Board of Jewish Edu-
cation, and the European
Council for Jewish Com-
munity Services all aided in
the research. In other coun-
tries, various individuals
and communal institutions
were asked to assist.
Current estimates show
that for the whole Diaspora,
excluding eastern Europe,
40 to 45 percent of all
Jewish children aged 3 to 17
were enrolled in Jewish
schools in 1981 and 1982.
Sixty-nine percent of these
pupils were in the United
States.

In the U.S., 72 percent of
the pupils receiving any
Jewish education attended
supplementary Jewish
schools, ranging from
once-a-week classes to daily
Hebrew school sessions. In
the United Kingdom, 53
percent of the pupils were
enrolled in supplementary
schools, while in other
major communities pre-
schools and day schools ac-
counted for from 60 percent
to 88 percent of enrollment.
In some smaller com-
munities almost all Jewish
education took place in
pre-schools and day schools.
In general, there were
almost 40 percent fewer
pupils at the secondary
school level than at the pri-
mary level. In supplemen-

tary schools, 70 percent of
the students stopped their
formal Jewish schooling
after their b'nai mitzvah.
Prof. Dubb is hesitant to
draw conclusions from the
numbers as they stand. He
pointed out that the de-
crease of pupils at secon-
dary level could be for a
number of reasons, ranging
from a lack of interest in
continuing education to a
scarcity of classes or schools
at the more expensive sec-
ondary school level.
"Statistics tell us nothing
about content or value,"
Prof. Dubb said. "Their im-
portance is in giving a fac-
tual basis as to how many
people we're talking about.
Without the numbers we
know very little."
"The project is being
sponsored by the Joint Pro-
gram for Jewish Education
under the auspices of the
Jewish Agency, the World
Zionist Organization, and
Israel's Ministry of Educa-
tion and Culture. These
three bodies are also the
sponsors of the World Lead-
ership Conference.
Prof. Dubb believes that
the statistics will provide an
important underpinning for
the conference. "The num-
bers they bandy about
should be factual and com-
prised on a world-wide
basis. They should help the
conference participants to
plan and to organize and
will add a significant di-
mension to their delibera-
tions."

Computer model of heart seen as new medical diagnostic aid

BILL OLIVER'S

22 Years Experience

The facts and figures on Jewish education

insight into the dynamics of
the healthy and unhealthy
heart.
For years, engineers have
used computers to build
electronic fascimilies of
bridges and skyscrapers be-
fore commiting their de-
signs to concrete and steel.
Once translated into a com-
puter image, the proposed
structure could then be ex-
posed to a variety ofcom-
puterized test conditions
such as wind storms, earth-
quakes, and extreme varia-
tions of temparature.

Taken of your guests
at Bar Mitzvas, wed-
dings, promotional
parties, etc.

Free Estimates

Call 863-7736
for info

547-4564

t

FIND IT

IN THE

AID5

Prof. Shmuel Sideman, left, with model of cardiovascular
system.

Haifa (JTA) — A team of
medical researchers at the
Technion-Israeal Institute
of Technology is developing
a three-dimensional com-
puterized model of the
human heart which will aid

doctors in the diagnosis and
treatment of heart disease.
The computer model can be
programmed to reproduce
different heart pathologies
in an accelerated time
frame, giving doctors better

Similarly, the Technion
research group of physi-
cians, engineers, architects
and computer specialists
are constructing a com-
puterized model of the
human heart based on the
mechanical, electrical and
chemical characteristics of
the real thing. The re-
search, headed by Prof.
Shmuel Sideman of the De-
partment of Biomedical
Engineering and director of
the Cardiac Research Cen-
ter, will enable researchers
to introduce such variables

as cholesterol level and
blood pressure, and observe
as the computerized heart
portrays the 10-year de-
velopment of a heart attack
in a matter of minutes.
According to Prof. Side-
man, this research will not
only aid in the diagnosis of
heart disease, but will also
help describe and classify
previously undefined func-
tions of the heart.

Help
save a life.
Donate
Blood.

R
A e
j ldeel =s

TI

Well Help.WillYai?

ACvntSav,ceol

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00L,,o

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