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September 21, 1984 - Image 22

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1984-09-21

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

22

Friday, September 21, 1984 THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

A.+•••••••••••••••••41

1


V

"HERB'S HEIMISH DEAL"

.


AUTO RUST
REPAIRS



SAVE 30-50%



eel 546-6200

ERADICO PEST CONTROL

1030 WOODWARD HGTS.

FREE ESTIMATE AT YOUR HOME OR OFFICE •



FREE PICK-UP AND DELIVERY

• A 493-0212
v


Loaners Available

CAPITOL REPORT

Specialists In
Housing
Pest Control





356-3677 •

Mideast

FERNDALE, MICH. 48220

• PROFESSIONAL, QUALITY SERVICE FOR HOME,
APARTMENT AND INDUSTRY
• SERVICING SOUTHEAST MICHIGAN FOR 50 YEARS
IN ALL PHASES OF PEST CONTPOL

FREE ESTIMATES

REASONABLE RATES

office Same Location Since 1972 home •

Herb Silver - Owner

♦ ••••••••••••••••••••

VPS PET SERVICES $4

• BOARDING
• GROOMING • TRAINING

BOARD PET, PARK FREE

If you are one of those who must take a trip to the kennel before you make your drive to
Metro Airport, then you will appreciate the 24-hour service offered by the VPS Pet
Services at 17840 Inkster Rd. When you board your dog or cat with them, says owner
Henry Van Der Werken, they will drive you to the airport and pick you up when you
return and park your car free at their 10 acre kennel where a trained dog polices the
area.

To board a pet for a week would cost $49.50 — $5/day boarding fee, $5 dip fee
(parasite protection) and a $9.50 driving fee ($4.75 driving fee each way), plus free
parking. It's a good deal when you consider a week's parking costs at least $25 at the
airport. And how convenient to leave your-pet just seven minutes from the airport.
Cats are also boarded in a separate building.

A Diamond...
The gift that outshines
all the rest

Whatever the occasion...maybe no occasion
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The Diamond People For Over 50 Years

SEPAOUZ 645-9200

114PIAW

30555 SOUTHFIELD RD CONGRESS BLDG SUITE

IONF BLOCK SOUTH OF 13 MIL F ROAM

100

The kennels are first rate, with individual indoor/outdoor covered pens for all breeds.
Call 941-4811 for information and reservations.

WEST: 17840 INKSTER ROAD

ROMULUS, MI 48114

941-4011

EAST: 22931 EAST 14 MILE ROAD

ST. CLAIR SHORES, MI 48082

293-3966

HOUSE of SHUTTERS

SINCE 1959

36% to 80% OFF

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DON'T LET THE CANDLES
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You Can't Afford Cataracts,
the Gift of Vision Should Be Free

If you or someone you know
are covered by Medicare and
have cataract surgery done in
a hospital it can cost you over
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Cataracts can prevent you
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You can't afford to miss life's
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"Keeping Your Future in Sight"

VERTICAL
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• STANDARD
MOVABLE

Medicare insurance is ac-
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means you save over
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STERLING HEIGHTS

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FARMINGTON HILLS

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LOEHMAN'S HUNTERS SQ.

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855-6972

261-6530

DEARBORN

ANN ARBOR

562-6972

665-8881

FLINT

234-7760

Continued from Page 2

"We don't want to bring the
Russians back into the picture,"
one American specialist com-
mented. He recalled the Carter
Administration's ill-fated Oct. 1,
1977 joint communique on the
Middle East signed with the
Soviet Union. That document,
which called for a reconvened
Geneva peace conference where
the United States and the Soviet
Union would serve as equal co-
chairmen, was bitterly denounced
by Israel and its many friends on
Capitol Hill, especially by the
more anti-Soviet Republicans.
Reagan and his political allies do
not want to reverse themselves
now.
The Reagan Administration
wants the United States to re-
main the only superpower with
enough credibility among both Is-
rael and the more moderate Arab
states to mediate additional steps
toward peace. That helps to ex-
plain why the concept of a Geneva
peace conference — still promoted
by Moscow and some of the Arab
states — is a non-starter, as far as
Washington is concerned.
Still, U.S. officials conceded,
Moscow has scored some impor-
tant points in the region over the
past year with the rise of Syrian
power in Lebanon and elsewhere.
Syria has become the Soviet
Union's main ally in the Middle
East.
The Kremlin leadership has
made a tremendous investment in
strengthening Syria's military
capability since the humiliating
setbacks suffered during the war
with Israel in the summer of 1982.
Moscow has more than made up
for Syria's losses in fighter air-
craft, tanks, advanced missiles
and other hardware. It has pro-
vided state-of-the-art weaponry,
especially in ground to gound and
anti-aircraft missiles. Some of
this equipment had never before
been supplied to countries outside
the Soviet bloc in Eastern Europe.
Renewed fighting between Is-
rael and Syria could result in
Soviet involvement — a fact of life
recognized by U.S. and Israeli of-
ficials. While this would not be
the first time Israeli and Soviet
forces have met each other in
combat, there is greater fear now
that the next time it could trigger
a superpower confrontation. The
level and degree of explosiveness
have increased — as have the
Soviet stakes in Syria.
In short, the forced abrogation
of last year's Israeli-Lebanese
peace accord, the rise in Syrian
military might and its enhanced
influence in Lebanon have com-
bined to strengthen the Soviet
stance in the Middle East.
But the Reagan Administration
clearly has hopes of reversing this
trend. U.S. officials sense that any
elevated stature given to the
Soviet role in the region by exten-
sive discussions with the United
States would prove counter-
productive to this objective. The
Administration is determined to
avoid putting the Soviets on the
same footing as the Americans in
the diplomatic arena.
That helps to explain why the
Middle East is not going to be high
on the agenda of Gromyko's meet-
ings with Shultz and Reagan. U.S.

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