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September 14, 1984 - Image 30

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1984-09-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

410.4001110011 4

LceNidar

CAMP TAMAKWA
IS LOOKING FOR
LOST CAMPERS.

COOKING

`Kosher Cuisine' incorporates
variety of international recipes

We just couldn't keep track of them all. Over the last fifty
years they've moved to new cities, taken new names
and traded in their camp t-shirts for business suits. And
now we're trying to track them down. If you know of
any old Tamakwans, or suspect one is lurking about
your home or office, please give him or her the
following information:

Camp Tamakwa of Algonquin Park is fifty years old. A
great birthday party reunion is scheduled for October 19,
1985 in the Detroit area.

To receive an invitation or further information please
call the Reunion Hot-line at (313) 544-0696, or complete
the questions below and mail this ad to:
The Great Tamakwa Birthday Reunion
23471 Gardner
Oak Park, MI 48237

NAME
ADDRESS
PHONE:

MAIDEN NAME

YRS. ATTENDED CAMP

noun 11x-nny 11/4

We Feed Your
Body &Your Mind

Join Us Monday Evening
For A Great Kosher Dinner

Catered by Rabbi Henry Goldschlag
under the supervision of the Council of Orthodox Rabbis

5:30-7:30 p.m.
and Great Classes 7:30-9:40 p.m.

One 1-pound package thin
wonton wrappers
2 cups peanut oil
I suggest you use the following:
two damp dish towels, a wok and a
wire skimmer.

JEWISH HISTORY THROUGH ART
Dr. Joseph Gutmann • 7:30-8:30 p.m.

THE JEWISH COMMUNITIES OF LATIN AMERICA
BETWEEN LEFT AND RIGHT: AN UNEASY BALANCE
Dr. Judith Laikin Elkin • 7:30-8:30 p.m.

THE WORLD OF FREUD
Dr. Sidney Bolkosky • 7:30-8:30 p.m.

THE CAMERA VIEWS CREATION: IMAGES FROM THE BIBLE
Dr. Gerald A. Teller • 8:40-9:40 p.m.

THE BIBLE'S FIRST FAMILIES IN ENGLISH LITERATURE
Dr. Joseph Lewis • 8:40-9:40 p.m.

MASTERPIECES FROM YIDDISH LITERATURE
Aliza Shevrin • 7:30-9:30 p.m.

ADVANCED BEGINNER'S HEBREW
Nira Lev • 7:30-9:30 p.m.

For a complete listing -
Please call for our schedule

352-7117 or 3541050

Classes begin September 6

13 MU RD

-

MMidrasha

COLLEGE OF JEWISH STUDIES

21550 W. Twelve Mile • Southfield, Mi. 48076

MIDMSHA

2

0

-

0
0

21330 12 WAD.



12 AMU RD

Helen Nash took matters into
her own hands.
She wanted to prove that
kosher cooking "could be as var-
ied, light, elegant and exciting as
one wished to make it."
In doing so, she compiled a
cookbook, Kosher Cuisine, which
incorporates a variety of interna-
tional recipes adapted for kosher
cooks.
Published by Random House,
and with illustrations by Pat
Stewart, the cookbook is divided
into the following sections:
Cocktail Food and First Course,
Poultry, Meat, Fish (dairy and
pareve), Pasta and Grains (dairy
and pareve), Salads (pareve),
Cakes and Cookies (dairy and
pareve), Desserts (dairy and
pareve), Pastries and Breads
(dairy and pareve), Stocks (meat
and pareve), Sauces and Salad
Dressings (dairy and pareve) and
Holidays.
Added features include a dis-
cussion on the definition of
kosher, symbols denoting kosher
products, notes on ingredients,
cooking methods, descriptions of
cooking utensils and helpful
hints.
Following are some sample re-
cipes:
CURRIED WONTONS
FILLING:
1 small potato
1 /4 cup peanut oil
% pound lean veal, ground,
and 1/2 pound lean chuck,
ground, then ground to-
gether twice
11/2 to 2 tbsps. black Chinese
soy sauce
11/2 to 2 tsps. kosher salt
11/2 tsps. sugar
1 medium onion, chopped fine
1 tbsp. Madras curry powder

• ••

II WI( P.O

Located in the Sigmund
and Sophie Rohlik Bldg.

To make the filling: Wash
potato, then, without peeling it,
boil in water until done. Let cool,
remove skin, and mash until
smooth.
Heat wok over high heat and
add 3 tbsps. of oil. When oil is hot,
add meat and stir fry over high
heat, stirring all the time, until
meat changes color and separates.
Stir in soy sauce, salt, and sugar.
Remove to a bowl.
Heat wok again and add re-
maining tbsp. oil. When oil is hot,
add onion and stir fry over
medium heat until soft. Add curry
powder, meat, and potato, in-
crease heat, and mix till
thoroughly combined. Seaon
generously and transfer to a bowl
to cool before filling the wontons.
To fill the wontons: Have a bowl
of cold water nearby. Unwrap
skins, but keep them covered with
a damp towel. Working with one
wrapper at a time, place it at an
angle on a sheet of wax paper. Put
1 tsp. filling at the corner nearest
you. Fold the corner over the fil-
ling and roll toward the center but
not to the end. Leave 1/2 inch of the
opposte corner unrolled. You will
have a triangle. Lightly moisten
the left-hand corner of the

triangle with cold water and bring
both ends together to overlap.
Moisten and pinch tightly to seal.
Place wontons on a cookie
sheet, with wax paper between
the layers. Cover with a damp
towel and refrigerate until ready
to fry. If the towel dries in the
refrigerator, moisten it.
To deep fry the wontons: Pre-
heat oven to 350 degrees F. Heat a
wok over high heat. When hot,
add the 2 cups oil and continu to
heat until oil reaches 350 degrees
F on a frying thermometer. (To
test if oil is hot enough without a
frying thermometer, drop a piece
of wonton wrapper into hot oil: If
it sizzles, oil is ready; if it burns,
oil is too hot.) Deep fry a few won-
tons at a time, turning them fre-
quently with chopsticks so that
they brown evenly. Fry till gol-
den, about 3 minutes. Remove
with a skimmer to a cookie sheet
lined with several layers of paper
towels, changing them frequently
as needed. Keep warm on a rack
set over a cookie sheet in the pre-
heated oven as you continue fry-
ing the rest. Serve hot.
Note: Ask your butcher to grind
each meat separately and then
grind them together, it makes the
meat fluffier.
Wonton wrappers come in ap-
proximately 1-pound packages
and can be found in Oriental
stores. Leftover skins, properly
wrapped, freeze very well. Frozen
wrappers should be defrosted in
the refrigrator.
If you fry wontons early in the
day, they can be reheated in a
preheated 300 degree F oven.
If you wish to make wontons
several days in advance, freeze
them, uncooked, on trays. When
frozen, transfer them to a plastic
bag. Deep fry while still frozen,
but allow a little extra time.
Yield: about 70.

MUSHROOM-BARLEY SOUP
/4 ounce dried Polish or
Czechoslovakian mush-
rooms
1 cup boiling water
2 medium leeks or onions
1/2. cup plus 2 tbsps. fine pearl
barley
9 cups Strong Chicken Stock
1 /4 bunch dill
Kosher salt
White pepper, freshly ground
Place dried mushrooms in a
small bowl and pour boiling water
over them. Let soak for about 1
hour. Strain soaking liquid
through a sieve lined with a paper
towel, squeezing mushrooms over
sieve to extract more liquid: set
liquid aside. Wash soaked mush-
rooms carefully to remove any
sand, pat dry with paper towels,
and chop coarsely. Cut off dangl-
ing roots and most of green stems
from leeks and discard tough
outer leaves. Dice leeks, put in a
sieve, and wash well under cold
running water to remove all sand;
drain. Wash barley in a sieve
under cold running water until
water runs clear.
In a saucepan, bring stock, re-
served mushroom liquid, chopped
mushrooms, leeks, barley, and a
few sprigs of dill to a boil. (Reserve
remaining dill for garnish.) Re-
duce heat and boil gently,
covered, for about 1 hour, or until
barley is soft. Discard dill sprigs
and season with salt and pepper.
Serve piping hot, in heated soup
bowls, garnished with lots of dill
snipped to bits with scissors.
Note: If fine barley is unavail-
able, use 1/2 cup medium-grain
barley instead; the soup will have
a coarse texture and a less-
delicate flavor.
If you like, you can refrigerate
this soup in the same saucepan in

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Continued on Page 38

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