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September 14, 1984 - Image 24

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1984-09-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

24

Friday, September 14, 1984 THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

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Israelis take stock of their
Los Angeles performance

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To say the least, Israel's
athletes didn't make a real strong
showing at the recently completed
Olympics. Just before I sat down
to write this column, I received a
call from an Israeli radio an-
nouncer, a long-time friend, who
was headed for home after a short
vacation. In discussing the Israeli
contingent's performance, he felt
that too much was expected of the
athletes and the pressure on
them, apparently, had a negative
reaction.
There's no question that Israel
has a long way to go before it can
take its place in the sun with the
more accomplished sports people
from around the world. Then
there is always the problem of an
Israeli athlete, particularly an
immigrant, who gets enthused
and decides to become a yored, an
emigrant. One of the better
weight lifters, who placed fifth in
the Montreal Games in 1976, has
settled in Canada, while a top-
flight wrestler also has left the
country.

The most outstanding example
of yerida is the American
woman's volleyball coach, Arie
Selinger. After receiving his edu-
cation in Israel, he came to the
States and got his master's and
doctoral degrees and stayed there.
There's no question he's one of the
foremost volleyball teachers in
the world and the U.S. net people
grabbed him as coach of the
women's team which went to the
finals in the Los Angeles Games
and finished with a silver medal.

THE Israeli contingent, which in-
cluded some 38 male and female
athletes as well as 12 coaches and
six officials, made a profound im-
pression upon the Los Angeles
Jewish community. They
attended services at three differ-
ent synagogues and huge crowds
came to the various synagogues
involved in order to greet the Is-
raelis. It was reported that in one
of the synagogue assemblies, the
rabbi waived a rule against
applauding and the Israelis were

given a fine round of cheers and
applause by the congregants who
were present.
IT'S been reported that coach
Ralph Klein of the West German
basketball team will definitely re-
turn to Israel after he concludes
his contract with the Cologne Five
this year. He left Israel for a sort
of two-year vacation, to get away
from the pressure of his coaching
duties with the Tel Aviv Maccabi
team. Klein now feels that the
pressure will be off him, so that
when he returns he will be able to
pick up the coaching position with
either Maccabi or any other team
which would be interested in his
services.
There's no question that he's
the top coach in Israel, and while
his departure for West Germany
created quite a stir and irritation
to some of the basketball officials,
they are willing to forget his tern-
porary absence and will welcome
him when he returns next year.

Copyright 1984, JTA, Inc.

Bar-Ilan scientists develop
early cancer detection test

BY ARNOLD AGES

According to the Israeli daily
Maariv, scientists working at
Bar-Ilan, the country's only uni-
versity under religious auspices,
have developed an early warning
system for cancer detection.
Profs. Arieh Weinrib and Motti
Deutsch, specialists in physics,
are the two men most closely asso-
ciated with a new technique that
has apparently been perfected to
determine an individual's cancer
proneness through blood testing.
Prof. Weinrib described more
specifically the way in which the
Bar-Ilan testing method operates.
It involves the labeling of lym-
phocytes (white blood cells re-
sponsible for the body's immune
responses) drawn from aggluti-
nated blood with a fluorescent
marker. Scientists are able to
measure the rate at which these
lymphocytes move and any devia-
tion in their normal trajectory
may be indicative of some begin-
nings of malignant growth. Iden-
tification of abnormal growth at
the earliest stage will permit the
application of treatment when
cancerous cells are in their mic-
roscopic incipiency.
Part of the Bar-Ilan break-
through involves the refining of
the machine used for detection
purposes and measuring the lym-
phocytes. The application of com-
puterized technology has vastly
accelerated the processing
method by which abnormal
movement in lymphocytes may be
detected.
While the old identification
procedure was a laborious and
time consuming one, the new
method developed by Bar-Ilan's
researchers will permit testing to
cover a much larger number of
patients — up to 250 in one day.
The new vaccine functions by
increasing the level of lympho T

cytes in the human organism and
thus works in tandem with the
body's immune system in its fight
against invading malignant
bodies.
The new vaccine has been
tested in Bar-Ilan's biology lab-
oratory where animals with
tumours were treated with the
A.S. 101 vaccine. A 95 percent
survival rate was noted among
the animals that were injected
with the A.S. 101.
Another recent discovery at
Bar-Ilan focused on a medication
developed by Prof. Rekah Beitner

which accelerates the healing
process in severe burns.
Beitner showed a film in which
laboratory rats had either been
scaled by boiling water or burned
by ultra violet rays. Within one
hour of the administering of an
injection all signs of the burn in-
juries of the rats disappeared. The
hemoglobin and albumin in the
blood serum near the skin's sur-
face returned to their normal
level and all redness associated
with burns disappeared as well.

Copyright 1984, JTA Inc.

Yom Kippur services slated
for Frankfurt Book Fair

New York — A North American
initiative to provide Yom Kippur
services for persons attending the
1984 Frankfurt Book Fair has
been undertaken by the JWB
Jewish Book Council, with the
cooperation and assistance of
representatives of the book pub-
lishing industry.
The Frankfurt Book Fair will
take place Oct. 3 to Oct. 8. Oct. 6 is
Yom Kippur.
The 1984 scheduling, according
to a story that appeared in the
New York Times last year, drew
reactions of "anguish and as-
tonishment" from publishers in
America, Great Britain, France,
Brazil and Israel.
Officials of the fair said that
they had been unaware of the
1984 date of Yom Kippur and
could not reschedule the event.
To accommodate persons at the
fair who wish to attend Yom Kip-
pur services, the JWB Jewish
Book Council, in cooperation with
the JWB Commission on Jewish
Chaplaincy and an ad hoc com-

mittee of representatives from the
book industry, has arranged for a
Yom Kippur service beginning
with Kol Nidre prayers before
sunset Oct. 5, and continuing
throughout Oct. 6.
Those who want to attend Yom
Kippur services at the fair should
contact Ruth S. Frank, director,
JWB Jewish Book Council, 15 E.
26th St., New York, N.Y. 10010-

1579, (212) 532-4949.

Agora short changed

Jerusalem (JTA) — Israel's
smallest monetary unit,, the Ag-
ora, a tenth of a Shekel, may soon
disappear, only five years after it
was introduced. Dr. Moshe Man-
delbaum, governor of the Bank of
Israel, is scheduled to introduce a
bill which would abolish the
Agora as legal currency. Such a
law would only formalize an exist-
ing situation since the Agora has
not been in use for the past two
years.

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