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September 07, 1984 - Image 62

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1984-09-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.



-

62

Friday, September 7, 1984

111 III 1

.

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

II 11 1 1111111111111111 11 1111111

NEWS

OPENING SEPTEMBER 1

an International Shopping Experience at

Reagan Mideast peace proposal
still valid: State Department

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Washington (JTA) — The State
Department last week noted the
second anniversary of President
Reagan's Sept. 1, 1982 Middle
East peace initiative by stressing
the Administration still considers
Reagan's proposals the most
"valid" means of achieving peace
between Israel and its Arab
neighbors.
Department spokesman John
Hughes, declaring that the pro-
posals in the initiative "remain as
valid today as when they were
presented," rejected as "unfair"
charges that the Administration
has not been pursuing it in recent
months.
He said that while there have
been many "obstacles" such as the
"upheaval in Lebanon," the Ad-
ministration has had a continuing

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however hard the assignment
may be and however long the
road."

However, many observers be-
lieve that the Administration's
Mideast effort has been put on
hold pending the U.S. and Israel
elections. Reagan did not mention
his initiative in his acceptance
speech to the Republican Na-
tional Convention nor is it men-
tioned in the Republican Party
platform.
Hughes refused to comment on
whether a new Israeli govern-
ment will accept the Reagan in-
itiative. Premier Menachem
Begin rejected the proposal as
soon as it was announced and his
successor, Yitzhak Shamir, main-
tained this position.

There's more to Dijon, France
than just mustard and wine

wallcoverings • lighting fixtures • custom formica furniture

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"major diplomatic effort" in the
Middle East. However, he
stressed, that does not mean that
any "imminent breakthrough" is
expected.
"That does not alter the fact the
peace is worth pursuing; that no-
body else has come up with any
other kind of alternative that
seems to make a great deal of
sense," Hughes said.
He rejected the Soviet Union's
proposal for an international con-
ference on the Mideast as not "a
particularly helpful or construc-
tive approach."
Hughes refuted the idea that
the U.S. would "do nothing and sit
back while people kill themselves
in the Mideast." He said that in-
stead the Administration's posi-
tion is to "continue to work at it,

Dijon, France (JTA) — Twenty
years ago, several hundred
thousand North African Jews,
fleeing an unstable and seem-
ingly dangerous future, sailed
across the Mediterranean to
France. Not everyone headed for
Paris, however. Many planted
their roots in small towns where
there had been few or no Jews.
One such settlement was Dijon in
Burgundy, an area which con-
jures up "a special mustard,"
world-famous fine wines and de-
licious poultry.
Forty years ago Dijon was lib-
erated from the Nazis who occu-
pied the city throughout the war
and who kept the town of 160,000
under tight surveillance because
it is an important railroad and
highway center.
Although the town synagogue
was used as a stable and garage by
the Germans. the house of wor-
ship survived the war. One person
who may have been responsible
for its escaping destruction was a
Catholic clergyman, Chanoine
(Canon) Kir, who later became
mayor of the municipality as well
as a member of Parliament. Kir
pursuaded the Germans not to de-
stroy the temple, and hid Jewish
ritual objects in his home.
In the fall of 1944, the first Yom
Kippur of liberated Europe,
American Jewish GI's from
throughout the battle zone
flocked to Dijon. "There were so
many American Jewish troops
here, that the overflow prayed in
the streets," recalled H.C. Bloch of
Dijon.
After World War II, the Jewish
community began anew. Since the
vast majority of Dijon Jews had
been deported during the war, it
was not until the 1960's with the
influx of the North African Jews,
that it flourished again.

Today, 250 Jewish families re-
side in Dijon, about 200 miles
southeast of Paris; a city of clean,
winding pedestrian streets, with
wooded 15th century houses; a
city where the old town remains
the shopping center; a city which
features the majestic palaces of
the Dukes of Burgundy.

Half of the 1,000 Dijon Jews are
Sephardic. There are no real ten-
sions to speak of between the
Sephardim and Ashkenazim,
though the service in the
synagogue is Sephardic ritual.
It is safe to say that as in all
parts of France, assimilation in
Dijon is high. After all, French
Jewish leaders said that, France
assimilated Jews faster than any
country in the world. One French
rabbi added that when the
Sephardim first came here two
decades ago, they accused the
Ashkenazim of assimilating.
"Now becau of the free society
here, the Sepharidm,'.' he said
sadly, "are doing the very same
thing. They also are assimilating;
and at a fast rate, too."
In discussing the nature of this
Jewish community, there are two
prevalent viewpoints. One is that
young people are moving toward

"traditional Judaism," according
to Bloch.
But Ms. Claude Houlmann,
who is Jewish and a tour guide in
Dijon disagreed. She thinks as-
similation is rampant. She also
said she has many Christian
friends and that she herself
"never experienced anti-
Semitism."
There are two kosher butcher
shops in Dijon, and a mikvah.
Rabbi M. Sibony said that the
synagogue is still the focal point
for the Jewish community. Serv-
ices are conducted Friday night
and Saturday morning. On
Saturday afternoons, there are
special services for young people.
Activities are held in the
synagogue on Sunday, including
Hebrew-language classes and
meetings of the Jewish National
Fund, WIZO, and an active com-
mittee for Soviet Jewry.

Argentine President promises
strengthening of Israel support

New York (JTA) — Argenti-
nian President Raul Alfonsin told
a visiting American Jewish
Committee delegation this week
that "Argentina will stick by its
moral principles and will not
again allow our representatives to
take knee-jerk anti-Israel posi-
tions at the United Nations and
elsewhere."
His remark referred to a vote in
favor of an Arab-sponsored reso-
lution against Israel last March in
Geneva, at a meeting of the UN
Commission on Human Rights.
He termed the vote "a mistake,"
adding that his government's
representative had voted against
official instructions.
Alfonsin's comments were
made during discussions with
Rabbi Marc Tanenbaum, director
of AJC's International Relations
Department, and Jacobo Kovad-
loff, director of the agency's Latin
American Office, who spent a
two-week fact finding mission in
Argentina, Brazil and Uruguay
last month.
Dr. Vivaldo Barbosa, secretary

of justice of the state of Rio de
Janeiro, informed the AJC offi-
cials that his office had recently
banned a PLO publication,
entitled Jerusalem, which carried
a flagrantly anti-Semitic article.
During a meeting with Foreign
Minister Dante Caputo, Tanen-
baum and Kovadloff discussed the
importance of the country's tran-
sition from a military dictatorship
to a constitutional democracy
committed to upholding human
rights. Caputo stressed that the
moral and practical support of the
American people and the Ameri-
can Jewish community was of
"profound meaning" to the Argen-
tine government during what he
called "this critical period."

Vocational service
aids older workers

Boston (JTA) — The Jewish
Vocational Service (JVS) of Bos-
ton is one of nine participants in
the first state-funded job training
program in Massachusetts
targeted for older workers.

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