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August 10, 1984 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1984-08-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

6 Friday, August 10, 1984

*

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

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Holocaust conference in D.C.
enlists Detroiters' assistance

Staff report
Detroit is represented on
the advisory committee for
the "Faith in Humankind:
Rescuers of Jews During the
Holocaust" conference
planned for Sept. 17-19 at
the U.S. State Department
in Washington, D.C.
Sponsored by the United
State Holocaust Memorial
Council, chaired by author
and human rights activist
Elie Wiesel, the conference
has enlisted the assistance
of Detroiters Maurice
Chandler; Sister Maureen
Fay, 0.P., president of
Mercy College of Detroit;
Louis H. Golden; David
Hermelin; Alvin Kushner,
executive director of the
Jewish Community Coun-
cil; Philip Minkin; Sister
Maurita Sengelaub, R.S.M.,
president of the Mercy Col-
laborative; and Sister Carol
Rittner of Mercy College,
who is serving as conference
coordinator with Dr. Harry
James Cargas.
The conference will bring
together scholars,
educators, survivors and
non-Jews who helped Jews
during the Holocaust.
According to Sister Carol,
the conference is not an in-
ternational gathering.

However, delegations from
Yad Vashem in Jerusalem,
from Italy and from Bul-
garia are expected to
attend.
Funding is coming from
independent fund raising,
and to date more than
$250,000 has been raised.
Mutual of America, whose
president William Flynn of
New York is chairman of
the advisory committee,
contributed $100,000 to the
conference.
Although there are no di-
rect ties between the con-
ference and Detroit's or any
other city's Holocaust
memorial center, each HMC
has been asked to send a
representative and to pro-
vide the names of survivors
who were helped to escape
during the Holocaust and
the names of persons who
aided them.
Among the guest speak-
ers are: George Shultz, U.S.
secretary of state; Gideon
Hausner, chairman of the
Council of Yad Vashem; A.
Bartlett Giamatti,
president of Yale Univer-
sity; Franklin Littell, pro-
fessor of religion at Temple
University; Robert McAfee
Brown, professor of ethics at

the Pacific School of Reli-
gion; Magda Trocme, wife of
Pastor Andre Trocme, the
spiritual leader of Le
Chambon-sur-Lignon,
France, during the war,
when the community saved
more than 2,000 Jews;
Rabbi Harold Schulweis,
founder and chairman of the
Institute for Righteous Acts
based at the Judah Magnes
Museum; Leo Eitinger, pro-
fessor psychiatry at the
Univeristy of Oslo and
Rabbi Irving Greenberg, di-
rector of the National
Jewish Resource Center.
A goal of the conference is
to bring together rescuers of
Jews and some of the people
who were rescued so that
their testimony can be re-
corded for posterity.
Oral histories of the re-
scuers will be collected and
conference proceedings will
be recorded to be placed in
the archives of the U.S.
Holocaust Memorial
Museum.
Registration deadline is
Sept. 7. For registration in-
formation, contact the U.S.
Holocaust Memorial Coun-
cil, 425 13th St. NW, Suite
832, Washingtori, D.C.
20004, (202) 724-0779.

Oakland judge orders 'get'
in local couple's divorce

Staff report

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Marjorie L. Feurerman,
28, of West Bloomfield, has
gone to Oakland County
Circuit Court to receive a
Jewish divorce settlement.
Ms. Feurerman claims
that despite receiving a
court-granted divorce in
February from her hus-
band, Barry S.Feurerman,
he has "failed to make the
proper arrangements for ob-
taining the Jewish divorce."
Although , a Jewish
woman who has not re-
ceived a "get" from her hus-
band may remarry as far as
the state is concerned, she
may not remarry according
to Jewish law.
"He's holding it over my
head to get what he wants,"
Ms. Feurerman said last
month before a hearing in
front of Judge Steven N.
Andrews in Pontiac.
Among the arguments be-
fore the court was a charge
that the court has no stand-
ing in the case because of
the religious implications
and is excluded by the First
Amendment to the U.S.
Constitution establishing
separation of church and
state.
Ms. Feurerman's attor-
ney, Henry Baskin, referred
to Feurerman's refusal to
obtain a "get" as "legal
blackmail." "It's something
- that -shouldn't;, ,eFfepi

allowed in our supposed
enlightened age," he said.
"But the fact remains it is
something that Jewish
women who get divorced
have had to deal with for
years."

Baskin said that there is
nothing in Michigan law
requiring a man to supply
his wife with a "get."
In handing down his deci-
sion last week, Judge An-
drews stated that the "get"
would be included as part of
the property settlement.
Ms. Feurerman has until
Oct. 1 to pay her part of the
settlement, $5,000. Once
paid, her husband has until

Nov. 1 to obtain a "get" for
Ms. Feurerman.
Baskin noted that divorce
matters often become com-
plicated, and therefore,
many Jewish men use the
"get" as a "bargaining tool"
in settlement negotiations.
In recent years, the "get"
question has been raised
frequently in civil divorce
cases. In New York, courts
have become so "flooded
with litigation" that the
state legislature passed a
law on the issue. The new
law allows a judge to de-
mand that a husband pro-
vide his wife with a "get"
before he is granted a civil
divorce. .

Tickets are still available
for Jewish film festival

Tickets are still available
for the Third Annual .
Jewish Film Festival which
will be held at 8 p.m. Sun-
day through Aug. 26 at the
Southfield Civic Center
Recreation Building.
The films West of Hester
Street and A Generation

who is forced to adjust to a
new way of life far from a
thriving Yiddish culture.
The second feature, "A
Generation Apart" portrays
the impact of the Holocaust
on families of concentration
camp survivors.
A
Vilna
Legend,
Apart are scheduled for scheduled for Wednesday, is
Sunday. West of Hester- a classic love story set in
Street interweaves the early 20th Century Jewish
events of the "Galveston Lithuania and stars Ida
Movement" with the story Kaminska. This movie is a
of a young Jewish peddler restored copy of a Ariddish

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