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July 27, 1984 - Image 28

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1984-07-27

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

28 Friday, July 27, 1984

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The race begins

Continued from Page 22

would only amount to about 53 seats.
Whoever is asked by Herzog to
form a government has six weeks to
do so. If the effort fails, the President
then asks someone else to try.
Shamir may prevail on Herzog to
choose him first since he is the ruling
Prime Minister and because he may
be able to form a coalition together
with the religious and more right-
wing small parties.
Though the prospect of a na-
tional unity government may sound
attractive, bringing together Likud
and Labor with a combined 85 seats,
it is fraught with problems, chief of
which is who will lead. Even if they
rotate, as some have suggested, the
two major parties are deeply divided
on the major issues of the economy
and territorial compromise. Instead
of dealing with those problems they
would likely be put on the back
burner.
One result of the inconclusive
election was to stymie any chance of
U.S. plans to bring the Israelis and
Arabs together soon.
Until a new coalition govern-
ment is formed, Shamir's govern-

ment will have a caretaker role that

doesn't lend itself to bold new
dealings for Mideast peace. But even
when the political picture clears, the
splintered verdict of Israeli voters
won't leave much room for productive
peace talks.
Officially, the United States did
not have a favorite in the Israeli elec-
tions. Unofficially, U.S. officials say
they would have preferred a decisive
Labor victory.
Peres promised bold moves to
open negotiations with King Hussein
of Jordan over returning some
Israeli-held West Bank territory in
exchange for peace. U.S. diplomats
had hoped they could move quickly
on the heels of such initiatives by
Peres to help arrange Israeli-
Jordanian talks over the future of
Palestinians on the West Bank.
State Department officials are
not optimistic that either a Likud or
Labor government or a national
unity government will be able to
move decisively on foreign policy is-
sues. "Whatever government they
form will be very weak," a State De-
partment official predicted.

Issues confronting Asian
Jewry topic of colloquium

Melbourne (JTA) — An
Asia-pacific Jewish Col-
loquium, to be held Sept.
11-12 in Singapore, will
complement the seminar on
anti-Semitism conducted
here last month under the
sponsorship of the Univer-
sity of Melbourne and the
Australian Institute of
Jewish Affairs, according to
Isi Leibler, president of the
Executive Council of Au-
stralian Jewry (ECAJ).
Both events "will serve to
bring to the attention of Au-
stralian Jewry the impor-
tant role it will inevitably
and increasingly play in
world affairs," Leibler said.
Australia, with a popula-
tion of 14.9 million, is home
to an estimated 75,000
Jews, the largest Jewish
population in the Asia-
Pacific region. The Jewish
population of other coun-
tries in the area ranges from
4,300 in India and 4,000 in
New Zealand to only 150 in
the Philippines.
"Australia, of course, con-
tains by far the largest, best
organized Jewish popula-
tion in the Asian Pacific
region," Leibler sid, and the
country "is much more
closely situation to East
Asia than is the United
States.
"I believe we have both
the opportunity and respon-
sibility to assist the smaller
Jewish communities of the
region and to work inofar as
we can to assist both the

.

Jewish people and for the
benefit of the State of Israel
in the Asia Pacific region,"
he said.
The Melbourne seminar
on anti-Semitism and
human rights last month
concentrated on the
"ideological convergence"
between the far right-wing
and the extreme left in con-
temporary anti-Semitism.
In summarizing the
seminar, Liebler noted that
"There was general agree-
ment that both historically
and at the present time, Au-
stralia hasbeen spared not

,

only the worst excesses of

the Western world's anti-
Semitism, but virtually any
significant organized
sources of anti-Jewish feel-
ing."
Nevertheless, Liebler ob-
served, "there is agreement
that anti-Semitism does
exist and may be on the rise.
Some of this renewed anti-
Semitism here," he said,
"represents the Australia
facet of the organized
ideological sources of the
extreme right and left
which exist around the
world."

Lebanese government seeks
close of joint commission

Jerusalem (JTA) — The
Cabinet this week
authorized Premier Yit-
zhak Shamir and Defense
Minister Moshe Arens to
decide at a future date
whether to accede to the
Lebanese government's
demand to close down the
joint Israeli-Lebanese
Liaison Commission, the
quasi-diplomatic mission
Israel has maintained for
the past two years at
Obaiye, 10 miles north of
Beirut.
Knowledgable observers
predicted there would be no
immediate decision. In the
longer term however, Israel
is, expected to close its mis-

sion, given Lebanon's dog-
ged insistence.
According to the sources
here, Israel has the option of
standing pat. The Israel-
backed "Lebanese Forces,"
the Christian Phalangists,
reportedly have offered to
guard the mission in place
of the. arms regulars who
have been withdrawn.
The mission, meanwhile,
has ceased issuing passes to
Lebanese who want to visit
Israel-occupied south Leba-
non. Government sources
here admit this is a form of
pressure on the Beirut
authorities • to rev _ erse their
decision. to shut down the
Liaison Commission.

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