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July 27, 1984 - Image 22

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1984-07-27

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.



—„

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

22 Friday, July 27, 1984

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Continued from Page 1

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continue to vote for Likud despite
Labor's repeated efforts to attract
them.
If there were winners in this in-
conclusive election they were Israel's
small parties, as both major parties,
Likud and Labor, lost power to the far
left and the far right. The major par-
ties lost ten seats to the smaller par-
ties and chief beneficiaries were the
religious parties. But even there one
could sense a new divisiveness. The
National Religious Party used to
dominate the religious political
scene; now there are four religious
parties dividing the same 12 seats in
the Knesset.
The electorate's move towards
the smaller parties displays a dis-
satisfaction with both Labor and
Likud, which voters viewed as
watered down in their ideologies.
They opted instead to express
sharper policies, but with the confu-
sion of so many parties winning seats
that sharpness will be blunted in the
crazy-quilt coalition that seems
likely to emerge.
The election results are being
seen in Israel as a defeat for Shimon
Peres in his third attempt to lead
Labor to victory and a personal
triumph for Yitzhak Shamir, who
had been regarded as a lackluster
successor to Menachem Begin.
Shamir will be trying to recon-
stitute the previous coalition and
then possibly claim the leadership of
a more broadly-based national unity
government, a political alternative
that attracted growing editorial and
public support after the election re-
sults proved inconclusive.
But Peres has until now rejected
the proposal of having Labor join in a
unity government.
With both major parties falling
well short of the 61-seat majority re-
quired to form a new government in
the 120-seat Knesset, they began
bargaining for support from the
smaller parties even while the votes
were being counted election night.
Both Likud and Labor were claiming
that they had the best chance to
patch together a coalition, but de-
spite the fact the Likud won fewer
seats it will have an easier time form-
ing a coalition, though it certainly
won't be easy and could take weeks.
The Tehiya Party, for example,
formed by Likud defectors who op-
posed Begin's peace treaty with
Egypt, got four seats and may get
another after the military votes are
counted. The party is seen as a "safe"
coalition partner for Shamir, but it
revealed its own demands.
Shmuel Lewin, a spokesman for
Prof. Yuval Neeman, the Tehiyah
Party leader, who is Minister of Sci-
ence and Development as well as
chairman of the Cabinet committee
on settlement of the administered

territories, said, "We'll join a Likud
coalition, but not if it includes Ezer
Weizman."
Weizman, whose Yahad Party
won two seats, is the former Likud
defense minister who was instru-
mental in the Camp David agree-
ment and now favors accommodation
with the Arabs. "We're opposed to
such accommodation," Lewin said.
But Tehiyah said it would join a
coalition that included the Kach
Party, which won one seat for its
leader, Rabbi Meir Kahane. At a
news conference, Kahane said his
condition for joining any coalition
was amnesty for Jews charged with
or convicted of terrorism. He has also
called for expulsion of all Arabs from
Israel and the territories.
But Shamir has said that "it is
completely unlikely" that Likud
would admit Rabbi Kahane's ex-
tremist party under any circum-
stances.
And so it goes.
Much of the power rests with
President Chaim Herzog who is free
to choose whichever leader he thinks
has the best chance to establish a
workable coalition. Herzog himself is
a member of Labor and he may very
well first ask Peres to form a gov-
ernment since it was Labor that re-
ceived the most votes. Two of Labor's
allies are the Shinui Party, headed
by Prof. Amnon Rubenstein, and the
Civil Rights Movement. But that

Continued. on Page 28

The Vote

Labor, led by Shimon Peres: 45
seats (1981, won 47)
Likud, led by Yitzhak Shamir: 41
(48)
National Religious Party, Dr.
Yosef Burg: 4 (6)
Communist Party: 4 (4)
Sephardic Torah Guardians,
former Chief Sephardic
Rabbi Ovadia Yosef: 4
Tehiya, religious party: 4 (3)
Shinui, led by Amnon Rubenstein:
3 (2)
Citizens Rights Movement: 3 (1)
Yahad, led by Ezer Weizman: 3
Morasha: 2
Agudat Israel: 2 (4)
Progressive List for Peace and
Equality: 2
Tami: 1 (3)
Ometz: 1
Kach, led by Meir Kahane: 1

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