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July 20, 1984 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1984-07-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

FriAW_Suii

.04

_

SUMMER CAMP SPECIAL






2 Colored T-Shirts
Sweat Shirt or Pants
Long Sleeve Hooded T-Shirt
3 Bandanas

$ 28°° DEL1VERED

RBJ SALES

SHOP AT
HOME SERVICE

967-4043

WHAT'S IM
MIME?
tVERYTHIMG!

IF YOU'RE
INTERESTED
IM DIAMONDS,

"Investment dressing .

because your best Investment Is you."

At Executive Custom Shirtmakers, Inc. we use
the finest fabrics and expert craftsmanship to
design each shirt especially for you. Because
after all, you're worth the investment.

Executive Custom Shirtmakers, Inc.
207 S. Woodward Ave.
Birmingham, MI 48011 642-0460

4 c7I

Nobody Sells Diamonds For Less And We Prove It

E 7\A D1J '17' The Diamond People For Over 50 years
MAW 30555 SOUTHFIFIO RD CONGRESS BLDG •100

11

IONE RI OCK SOUTH OF 13 MIIIROAO1

PHONE 645-9200

9

AL ./ aukew, co.

LUGGAGE & LEATHER GOODS REPAIR
Is Proud To Announce Their

50 th ANNIVERSARY

HARRISON
REPAIR
FAMILY

Over half of our repair experts have been with Harrisons
for over 15 years. Collectively our staff represents over
150 years of quality REPAIR EXPERIENCE.



IN HONOR OF OUR 50th ANNIVERSARY
I
THIS COUPON IS WORTH $5.00 OFF THE 1

LAJJ
LOU [ILA
I REPAIR
rmr min (only one coupon per repair)
COST I OF I YOU
NEXT
=== mono sommieloommal

AL HARRISON LUGGAGE OUTLET
I LUGGAGE REPAIR CENTER

3116 W. 12 Mile (between Greenfield & Coolidge)

545-7393

Member National Luggage Repairmen Association

Harrison Luggage

152 N. Woodward
Birmingham
646-8088

BETWEEN YOU & ME

BORIS SMOLAR

IMMIGRATION YESTERDAY: Sixty years ago this
month — on July 1, 1924 — Jewish mass emigration to the
United States from Poland, Galicia, Romania, the Baltic
countries — as well as emigration of Jews who succeeded to
get out of Soviet Russia and lived as refugees mostly in
Berlin and Paris — was cut off. Congress adopted a Na-
tional Origin Quota system under which no more than
167,000 immigrants could enter the country annually from
all parts of the world. Preference within this system was
given to those from West European countries at a time
when emigration to the U.S. of Jews from East European
countries was an urgency because of poverty, anti-
Semitism and oppression.
Under the new immigration law, entrance of immig-
rants born in Poland — no matter in which country they
resided — was reduced from tens of thousands a year to
merely 5,982. The quota for Romania, an anti-Semitic
country from where there also Was a large Jewish emigra-
tion, was set at 603 a year. The measure was a great blow
for Jews in East European countries. For them, the drastic
cut down in the entrance of aliens under the new law meant
that the gates of the country, which in earlier years wel-
comed the poor and oppressed, were now virtually slammed
shut.
When the new law went into effect on July 1, 1924, it
left thousands of Jewish emigrants- who were already in
possession of U.S. visas and steamship tickets stranded at
various ports in Europe. About 8,000 Jewish emigrants
from Russia were faced with the grim news that the quota
for Russian-born had already been filled for 1924.
The two eminent American Jewish leaders, Louis
Marshall and Rabbi Stephen S. Wise, made repre-
sentations in Washington, but to no avail. The situation of
the emigrants who continued to pour in from Poland,
Romania and other countries with their U.S. visas into the
ports of embarkation — only to discover that they will not
be admitted to the United States until their turn under the
new quota system will come — became even more precari-
ous when the countries in which they were stranded
threatened them with expulsion. Under the new quota,
many of them would have to wait from 10 to 15 years until
their turn would come. Jewish organizations in the U.S.
were deluged by frantic appeals for help. HIAS sent a dele-
gation which visited the ports in the countries where many
thousands of Jewish emigrants found themselves stranded.
These ports were in England, France, Holland, Germany,
Danzig, Latvia and Romania.
Thanks to the efforts of this delegation, the deporta-
tions were stayed and the steamship companies agreed to
take care of the migrants until final destinations were
found for them.
IMMIGRATION TODAY: Today, immigration re-
strictions still exist, But a Senate-House conference is now
engaged in solving diffeences between the two branches of
the U.S. Congress on legislation which would grant am-
nesty to Hispanics who entered this country illegally.
A BLACK SPOT: Jewish leaders are watching with
interest for the outcome of the House-Senate conference
inasmuch as the decisions of this conference will shape the
future of the U.S. immigration policy into the next century.
They hope that the differences between the bill approved by
the House and the one approved by the Senate will be
resolved in favor of greater compassion for ethnic and
minority interests.
It is still fresh in the memory of many in the Americad
Jewish community the inhumanity shown by the American
Administration in the case of more than 900 German Jews
who in 1939 .— shortly before Hitler unleashed World War
II and occupied Poland and other European countries sub-
sequently annihilating six million Jews there in concentra-
tion camps and in special gas installations — left all their
belongings in Germany and bought tickets on the
Hamburg-American liner St. Louis to the United States via
Cuba. •
Not only were these efforts rebuffed, but U.S. Coast
Guard cutters shadowed the St. Louis with orders to pre-
vent any of the refugees froth jumping overboard and
swimming ashore. It was a cruel form of man's inhumanity
to man that the Roosevelt Administration displayed.
During the days when thehorrible tragedy was being
enacted right of American doors, the government in Wash-
ington made no effort to relieve in some way the desperate
situation. However, other countries did not follow Wash-
ington's way. While the St. Louis was on the high seas back
to Germany the governments of England, France, Belguim
and Holland = acting on JDC appeals — agreed to admit
the refugees. England admitted 287 of them, when the ship
stopped at Southhampton, France admitted 224 of them,
214 were admitted to Belgium and 181 to Holland.
Today, when the U.S. Congress favors the legalization
of about two million Hispanics who entered the United
States illegally, the St. Louis episode comes back to life in
the memory of Americans who never made peace with
Washington's rejection 45 years ago of admission to this
country of the Jewish refugees from Nazi Germany

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