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June 29, 1984 - Image 50

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1984-06-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.



A

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

Friday, June 29, 1984 51

Wedding, Rehearsal and
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IN III

Sharon Padzensky

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council of Berkeley to send a
letter to the President pro-
testing the use of U.S. funds
for Israeli settlements on
the West Bank. Dellums
thought the measure
polarizing and "destructive
of dialogue."
Whatever their dif-
ferences with Israeli policy
and pro-Israel forces, these
congressmen say they sup-
port Israel's continued
existence within secure and
recognized borders.
Most of the current dif-
ferences between the black
and Jewish communities
have arisen in the wake of
Jesse Jackson's candidacy.
But even with the current
contretemps, the black con-
gressional offices report
minimal response from
their constituents. This
squares with a recent Har-
ris Poll which found "re-

markable agreement" be-
tween Jews and blacks on
political and social issues.

"The relations between
the Jewish and black mem-
bers are of long-standing,
and they are leaders of their
respective communities,"
Rep. Dixon says. "They are
going to take extremists
with a grain of salt. Either
the radical right of the
Jewish community or the
Farrakhan affair is not
going to affect their work on
a day-to-day basis.

Gray is especially in-
censed by media coverage of
black-Jewish relations
which he sees as polarizing
and stereotyping. He fears
that the saturataion cover-
age of tensions between the
communities feeds the pos-
sibility of rifts at the local
level.

"When one person who is
black makes a statement, it
gets billed as if he's speak-
ing for all black people.
Then the black community
is portrayed as monolithic. I
find that rather insulting,"
Gray says. The same holds
true for Jewish leaders.
Moreover, he faults the
media for portraying
legitimate policy debates
between blacks and Jews as
major rifts between com-
munities.
"Why is it we have
allowed people outside our
communities to posture pol-
icy disagreements as ten-
sion between the com-
munities?" he asks. "That is
racism and anti-Semitism
of the most raw and sophis-
ticated kind."

Washington Jewish Week fea-
ture.

Are Israeli universities meeting
the needs of Israeli society?

BY SIMON GRIVER

Jerusalem — A storm of
controversy was whipped up
by Israel's Minister of Trade
and Industry, Gideon Patt,
when he intimated that the
country's universities are
not geared to meet the real
needs of Israeli society.
In questioning the aims of
Israel's higher education
system, Patt challenged
some of the basic values in
which Zionism and Jewish
history have traditionally
been steeped. Should higher
education be like a conveyor
belt, catering to the needs of
industry and commerce? Or
should the universities pro-
vide enlightenment for
their own sake?
Patt pushes for the former
and says so forcefully. His
reasoning is that Israel's
economy is ailing because
too many people are em-
ployed in services and too
few in production. In par-
ticular, the country's best
hope for industrial expan-
sion lays in the develop-
ment of the nation's already
flourishing high-tech
enterprises, the cabinet
member said.
Patt feels that the univer-
sities are not supplying
graduates with relevant
qualifications for greasing
the wheels of industry. In a
recent speech at the Hebrew
University, he said, "Judaic
and abstract studies domi-
nate the curricula. If young
people wish to study the
humanities, philosophy or
other disciplines — that's
fine. But the Israeli tax-
payer should not have to
support that study."
Reactior ► to these 'words

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was strongest from science
academics themselves. A
letter to the Jerusalem Post
signed by several eminent
Hebrew University scholars
including Professor Hanoch
Gutfreund, head of the uni-
versity's Racah Institute of
Physics and Professor
Raphael Goren, dean of the
Faculty of Agriculture in-
cluded the following point:
"The Hebrew University
of Jerusalem was conceived
and founded by the fathers
of the Zionist movements,"
they wrote, "as the univer-
sity of the Jewish people all
over the world. This the
university was, is and must
remain. Its task as a
spiritual and intellectual
center of the human heri-
tage and of Jewish learning
is no less vital than its prac-
tical job of service to the
state's development and
prosperity."
Dov Keren Ya'ar,
Secretary-General of Is-
rael's Council for Higher
Education reports that by

4,117 1{....,,raa••• =t

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its budgetary allocations,
the council, which channels * 12 Count Packagi
government funds into the
universities, does a great
deal towards encouraging
1:
students to enroll for sci-
ence subjects. The Haifa
1 *
Technion which has 7,000
students of the sciences re-
ceived a budget of $80 mil-
lion during 1983, while
Haifa University which has
6,000 students of
humanities and social sci-
ences received only $26 mil-
lion.
Israel has 65,000 stu-
dents at six universities and
Package 1 *
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The largest institution is
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17,500 students.
In addition, the Open
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adults to earn degrees in
their leisure time, while
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other institutions of higher
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