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June 29, 1984 - Image 24

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1984-06-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

-•

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

24 Friday, June 29, 1984

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Washington (JTA) — The
Reagan Administration has
described as "flawed" the
performance of the Soviet
Union and the East Euro-
pean countries in the area of
human rights.
"Although the record of
compliance varied among
the Eastern states, the per-
formance was in general
flawed in human rights and
the humanitarian area,"
the State Department said
in the 16th semi-annual re-
port on the implementation
of the Helsinki Act. The re-
port also deals with the
follow-up on Helsinki which
ended in Madrid last fall.
The report, which covers
the period from Dec. 1, 1983,
to March 31, 1984, was
submitted by the State De-
partment on behalf of
President Reagan to Rep.
Dante Fascell (D-Fla.),
chairman of the Commis-
sion on Security and Coop-
eration in Europe (CSCE).
The report documents the
persecution which many
Soviet citizens, including
Nobel Prize winning scien-
tist, Dr. Andrei Sakharov,
have suffered for focusing
attention and attempting to
alleviate the violation of
human rights in the Soviet
Union. This report is an im-
portant element in the U.S.
government's effort to
assess the progress and
shortcomings in the Hel-
sinki Act's goals of
"strengthening security,
expanding cooperation,
building mutual confidence,
and protecting human
rights," a State Department
spokesman stated when the
report was transmitted.
The report pointed out a
few "bright spots." It stated
that "For most of the CSCE
participating states, the
status of implementation
over the current reporting
period did.,not change sig-
nificantly from earlier
periods.
"Some encouragement
could be taken from pro-
gress by Bulgaria in resolv-
ing divided family cases, the
continuing dialogue be-
tween the Polish govern-
ment and the Roman
Catholic Church, a limited
extension in U.S.-
Czechoslovakian cultural
relations, and an upsurge
during the first three
months of 1984 in the
number of citizens allowed
by the German Democratic
Republic to emigrate.
"The eastern govern-
ments also generally com-
plied with their undertak-
ing to publish the Madrid
Concluding Document.
These relatively bright
spots must be seen, how-
ever, in the wider context of
strict government control
and limitations on political
and.religious expression."

The report stressed that
"Continued deterioration of
the Soviet Union's already
poor record of compliance,
however, gave greatest
cause for concern. The
Soviet authorities intro-
duced further amendments
to the legal code to
strengthen their hand
against independent forms
of expression and to lend a
fictitious air of due process
to the ongoing campaign of
repression against dissident
elements.
"Laws on treason and
anti-Soviet agitation and
propaganda were
broadened. A new regula-
tion introduced the concepts
of 'service secret' aimed at
even further inhibiting the
free flow of information and
ideas between Soviets and
foreigners."

The report added, "Soviet
persecution of individuals
who attempted to express
themselves outside the
framework of state-
controlled organs continued
apace in the period under
review.
Religious believers, prop-
onents of greater cultural
and political rights for

ethnic minorities, peace ac-
tivists, and human rights
monitors were all subject to
arrest and imprisonment.
"Internationally-known
human rights activists
Sakharov, Yuri Orlov and
Anatoly Shcharansky con-
tinued to suffer varying de-
grees of unjustified con-
finement and persecution.
Numerous less well-known
figures were sentenced to
terms in the notorious
Soviet labor camp system.
Soviet abuse of psychiatry
also continued."
Despite commitments
under the Helsinki Final
Act to facilitate family
reunifications, the report
charged that "the rate of
emigration from the Soviet
Union continued to decline
below the disappointing
figures of early 1983. The
decrease in Jewish emigra-
tion was accompanied by an
increase in the level of offi-
cial anti-Semitic prop-
aganda."
The final Madrid Con-
cluding Document provides
for another follow-up meet-
ing in Vienna in November
1986. A series of
supplementary meetings
will also be held before then.

Hearings begin on shift
of U.S. Embassy in Israel

Washington (JTA) — The
Arab World would regard
the moving of the U.S. Em-
bassy in Israel from Tel
Aviv to Jerusalem as "the
first step on the part of the
United States" toward U.S.
acceptance of the Israeli
position on Jerusalem, ac-
cording to Michael Arma-
cost, Under Secretary of
State for Political Affairs.
Armacost was the first per-
son to testify in hearings
this week before the House
Foreign Affairs Commit-
tee's subcommittee on
Mideast Affairs and Inter-
national Operations.
The
Administration
strongly opposes the pro-
posal and has been trying to
get Congress to defer a vote
on the proposed legislation
to move the U.S. Embassy
in Tel Aviv to Jerusalem
until after the November
elections. However, suppor-
ters of the legislation
warned the Reagan 4d-
ministration at hearings
that they intend to force a
House vote by early August.
Rep. Tom Lantos (D-
Calif.), who originated the
legislation in the House,
and Rep. Daniel-Mica, (D-
Fla.), chairman of the In-
ternational Operations
Subcommittee, Old Arma-

^ • • -

cost that the bill most likely
would be approved by the
House Foreign Affairs
Committee in late July and
by the full House in early
August. It is believed that a
majority of members of
Congress will support the
bill to avoid alienating
Jevhsh voters before the
elections.
If the legislation passes,
President Reagan will have
two options ,— vetoing the
legislation or ignoring it on
the grounds that Congress
lacks the constitutional
power to mandate the loca-
tion of embassies.

Flat satellite
dish . in works

Washington — Scientists
at the Weizmann Institute
in Rehovot, Israel are cur-
rently developing a new flat
antennae to replace the
parabolic dishes and horns
used in satellite communi-
cations, Aviation Week and
Space Technology magazine
reported. The new design is
expected to be, more com-
pact, lighter in weight and
less costry to manufacture.

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