100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

The University of Michigan Library provides access to these materials for educational and research purposes. These materials may be under copyright. If you decide to use any of these materials, you are responsible for making your own legal assessment and securing any necessary permission. If you have questions about the collection, please contact the Bentley Historical Library at bentley.ref@umich.edu

May 25, 1984 - Image 20

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1984-05-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

20 Friday, May 25, 1984

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

NEWS



MCP

FOR BOYS AND GIRLS

Luncheon, lecture by MSU prof
mark Historical Society 25th

1935-1984
50TH ANNIVERcARY Rc
October 19, 20 & 21, 1984

Inn On The Park — Toronto

For further information contact
Toronto:
Box 124, 238 Davenport Road, Toronto M5R 1J6
(416) 923.7176

BY TEDD SCHNEIDER

Staff Writer

Detroit Contact: Sara Frank (313) 646-7366

YOUR KEY TO
RESIDENTIAL AND
COMMERCIAL
SECURITY

Alarm
Systems

FROM$499. 0 °
Call now for FREE
Security Inspection

(313) 669-2206
1-800-336-9932

INTRUSION

MEDICAL

inicE-LICEIVE

NERVICE1 Inc.

the security people

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • I


• • •


• •
• •
THIS IS WHAT WE TAKE IN


"PRIDE"

EVERYTHING WE DO FOR YOU.







• DRAPERIES • BEDSPREADS • BLANKETS

(Cleaned or Laundered) •


WINDOW
SHADES
• LAMPSHADES • PILLOWS

VENETIAN BLINDS (Cleaned, retaped & re-corded)


ANY OTHER ITEMS YOU MAY HAVE — IF IT CAN BE

CLEANED, WE'LL CLEAN IT AND CLEAN IT PROPERLY


Att. If you're moving we can remake and re-install


/co*
your existing draperies to fit another window or

room.



VISA'

We Remove & install





DRAPERY CLEANERS

Suburban Call Collect


• 41All that the name implies." VISA & MASTERCHARGE


1

$ 31

1

891-1818


• •
• •
• •
• •
• •
• •
• • •
• •


•• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

In the era prior to the
Anti-Defamation League of
B'nai B'rith, cartoonists had
a virtual field day with de-
rogatory representations of
Jews, according to Prof.
John Appel.
Appel, professor of
American Thought and
Language at Michigan
State University, was the
guest speaker SunIay for
the Jewish Historical
Society of Michigan's 25th
annual luncheon meeting at
the Standard Club North.
The Jewish storekeeper
who burns down his unpro-
fitable business to collect
the insurance money; Jews
drawn with hooked noses
and diamond stick pins in
their lapels; overdressed,
overfed and overbearing
Jewish women — all were
popular stereotypes propa-
gated by the top newspaper
and magazine cartoonists of
the late 19th Century in the
United States and Europe,
according to Prof. Appel.
"Leading the parade of
occupational stereotypes for
cartoon Jews was the
pawnbroker, known in both
England and America as
`uncle,' " Prof. Appel said.
He explained the origin of
the term as coming from a
New York comedian who
made numerous references
to his four nephews working
in a pawn shop.
Appearances and occupa-
tions weren't the only
Jewish characteristics sav-
agely lampooned in carica-
tures drawn by artists such
as Thomas Nast, the MSU
professor said. "Jewish
names furnished humorous
suggestions for puns by car-
toonists — Eastern Euro-
peans because their names
ended with 'sky' and the
Germans, who were made
up of a collection of 'steins.' "
Prof. Appel, who pre-
sented a series of slides in
conjunction with the lec-
ture, pointed out that some
of the cartoons illustrated
the economic tensions divid-
ing the segments of the
Jewish community in
America during the period.
The established German-
Jews, who had come to the
United States in the early
part of the 19th century,
were, by century's end, feel-
ing the pressure of the social
discrimination resulting
from the immigration of
their impoverished Eastern
European counterparts.
In honor of the Historical
Society's 25th anniversary,
State Sen. Jack Faxon pre-
sented a pair of resolutions
to the organization's outgo-
ing president, Bette Roth.
The first resolution was in-
troduced in the Senate by

MSU Professor John Appel prepares slides for his lecture
during the 25th anniversary luncheon of the Michigan
Jewish Historical Society last Sunday.

Faxon and the second was
introduced in the House and
signed by the six Jewish
members of the state legis-
lature.
Program chairman Eve-
lyn Noveck noted greetings
from U.S. Senators Carl
Levin and Don Riegle, U.S.
Rep. Sander Levin, Jacob R.
Marcus of the American
Jewish Historical Society
and others.
The society also installed
its officers for 1984-1985.
They are: Stanley N.
Meretsky, president; Le-
nore Miller and Evelyn
Noveck, vice presidents; Ida
Levine, treasurer; Adele
Staller, recording secretary;
Ann Abrams, correspond-

ing secretary; and Esther
Klein, financial secretary.

Elected to the board of di-
rectors were: Leonard An-
tel, Sarah Bell, Carol
Altman Bromberg, Walter
L. Field, Carol Finerman,
Bernard Friedman, Morris
Friedman, George
Goldstone, Laurence Im-
erman, Reuben Levine and
Judy Nolish.
Also, Harold Norris, Pat-
ricia Pilling, Abraham
Satovsky, Bette Schein,
Oscar D. Schwartz, Irwin
Shaw, Howard B. Sherizen,
Betty Starkman, George M.
Stutz, H. Saul Sugar, Lee
Waldbott and Janis
Waxenberg.

Weisenthal Center pushes
for Wallenberg memorial

Budapest (JTA) — On the
occasion of the 40th an-
niversary of the destruction
of the Hungarian Jewish •
community by the Nazis
during World War II, the
Simon Wiesenthal Center's
mission of remembrance
and renewal held substan-
tive discussions last week
with Hungarian Deputy
Prime Minister Istaban
Sarlos, covering a wide
range of issues, according to
the World Jewish Congress
(WJC).
While thanking the Hun-
garian government for its
progressive policies vis-a-
vis its 100,000 Jewish citi-
zens (the Jewish commu-
nity has a vibrant and au-
tonomous cultural and reli-
giout life), and while ex-
pressing the hope that it
would serve as a model for
the other Eastern block
countries, officials of the
Wiesenthal Center urged
the government of Hungary
to establish a permanent

memorial on Raoul Wallen-
berg Street. The street is
situated in the heart of the
area where the Swedish dip-
lomat sheltered tens of
thousands of Jews in "safe
houses" during the last
months of World War II.
Rabbi Marvin Hier, Wie-
senthal Center Dean and
head of the delegation, said
"After all, Raoul Wallen-
berg not only saved 100,000
Jewish lives, he zedeemed
the good name of Hung'
by thwartig the plans
Nazi fascists to eliminate
the entire Hungarian
Jewish community."

Space tests

Jerusalem (JTA) — Prof.
Shmuel Shoshan, a Hebrew
University scientist, has
been invited by the Euro-
pean Space Agency (ESA) to
submit proposals for bio-
medical experiments in
space related to the phe-
nomenon of weightlessness.

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan