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April 27, 1984 - Image 44

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1984-04-27

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

44

Friday, April 27, 1984

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

Esther Shapiro

PRIME RIB or
NEW ZEALAND
WHITE FISH (Orange

fOR

Roughy)

Dinner Includes: Soup or Salad,
Garlic Sticks, Rolls and Butter

99c HAPPY HOUR

4-6 P.M.
10 To Closing
Tuesday thru Friday

TUES.-FRI. 4-11 P.M.
SAT. 4-6:30 P.M.

Orchard Lake Road at West Maple

Banquet Facilities Available
Stuart Rogoff at the piano Thurs.- Sat.

626-1587

DlM itr

Of Southfield
25080 Southfield Road at 10 Mile
569-0882
SERVING COMPLETE GREEK CUISINE

a

• Cocktails

LUNCH and DINNER

• American Dishes

HOURS: MON.-SAT: 11 a.m. to 2 a.m., SUN. 11 a.m. to 12 mid.
Kitchen open tiL.12 mid. Sun.-Thurs. til 1 a.m. Fri. & Sat.

COMPLETE
BANQUET FACILITIES
FOR ALL AFFAIRS

SUNDAY 10 ALL-YOU-CAN-EAT
BRUNCH
a.m. to 2:30 p.m.

$795

Adults

Children
$45° under 10

Inc: Coffee,
Tea or Bev.

OUTSIDE CATERINO

AVAILABLE
FOR ALL OCCASIONS ,

441•111111MMOINIIINV

ligaragirMaIWAINMEMmummeml‘p

arcati6ur

One of Metropolitan Detroit's
Most Beautiful and Exciting
Restaurant-Lounges

NOW AVAILABLE
FOR YOUR FAVORITE OCCASION
EVERY SUNDAY ALL DAY

SATURDAYS ALSO . . . 12 Noon to 5 p.m.

• Bar Mitzvah
• Shower
• Birthday

I

• Bat Mitzvah
• Banquet
• Sweet 16

• Wedding
• Anniversary
• Reunion

We Also Make Party Trays 1

Call Your Host, PAT ARCHER: 3584355

28815 FRANKLIN ROAD AT NORTHWESTERN & 12 MILE • Southfield

41R.

.111.06

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Continued from Page 80

yelled at me for something I had done. It
had nothing to do with my being Jewish.
He was giving it to everyone that day.
When I sat there watching other people
come out of his office, they looked like
Lebanese fleeing Beirut.
"As a Jew in this administration, not
one of the conflicts I have ever had with my
colleagues was based upon the fact that I
was Jewish. And I'm really sensitive to
that. The mayor would not tolerate it if any
anti-Semitism were ever directed against
me."
Does Shapiro ever get involved in the
kosher meat controversy? "Not really," she
replies, "because there aren't any more
kosher butchers left in Detroit proper.
Sometimes, especially around the holi-
days, I will get phone calls from elderly
women complaining about higher prices
for kosher meat, and I will do whatever I
can. But that leads into an interesting
story.
"My husband Harold, who has just re-
tired, was a union organizer for the Amal- •
gamated Meatcutters and Butcher Work-
men, and the kosher butchers in Detroit
were his assignment — his locals. The
kosher butchers were really concerned
that purchasers of corned beef, hot dogs
and other meat products were being misled
by the 'Kosher Style' label. I mean, what
are 'Kosher Style' pickles anyway?
"So the butchers brought the problem
to the attention of my husband. Since we
were close friends of Coleman Young, who
was then a state senator, my husband went
to Lansing and as a result, Young intro-
duced a bill making it illegal in the state of
Michigan to label any product as 'Kosher
Style' unless it maintains the quality of a
kosher product. The bill passed and be-
came law. It's still on the books although
there isn't any money with which to
enforce it."
What's keeping Esther Shapiro hop-
ping these days? She begins her countdown
with "I'm inundated with requests about
all those sweepstakes mailings. Plus
things like those fantastic 'special offers'
you see hanging outside in the 'Hall of
Fraud.' Imagine! $5 emeralds! All those big
full page ads in Sunday newspapers.
"I'm packing up a whole batch of these
ads to send to the Federal Trade Commis-
sion in Washington. They're the only ones
who put a stop to the practice, but I won't be
keeping my fingers crossed.

International Red Cross negotiating talks -
for a deal on Israel-Syria POW exchange

Tel Aviv (JTA) — Israel is
in the opening stage of indi-
rect contacts with Syria for
a prisoner-of-war exchange,
Defense Minister Moshe
Arens disclosed in a radio
interview this week. He
said the contacts were es-
tablished through the In-
ternational Red Cross.
The Syrians hold three Is-
raeli soldie4s captured in
Lebanon who would
presumably be exchanged
for 290 Syrian soldiers held
by Israel. Four more Israeli
soldiers are prisoners of
PLO dissidents and six Is-
raeli soldiers are still listed
as missing in Lebanon.
There are presently about
2,700 Arabs in Israeli pris-
ons convicted of terrorist
acts or other security of-
fenses.
Meanwhile, Arens denied
reports from Damascus that

,

Israel is massing troops in
Lebanon's Bekaa Valley for
an attack on Syrian forces,
but he warned the Syrians
that if they initiated hos-
tilities against Israel they
were bound to be defeated.
Arens said Israel has no
intention of attacking
Syria. He was responding to
Syrian Defense Minister
Mustafa Tias's claim, in a
broadcast speech Monday,
that Israel and the U.S.
were preparing to attack his
country.
Tias said Syria would
repel such an attack with
the aid of the Soviet Union
and other Arab states.
Arnes suggested that Sy-
rian war talk was intended
to camouflage internal ten-
sions over a possible suc-
cessor to President Hafez
Assad who is believed to be

.

5



11

"We've also got a very serious home
improvement scam in the area — over-
charging old people for shoddy work. I also
want to get the state to take a closer look at _
the layaway system. The consumer has
absolutely no rights under the current sta-
tute and I hope to find a legislative correc-
tion for the problem. We hear of far too
many consumers who are losing their
money on big ticket items.
"In addition, I'll be doing a series of
internal programs for the consumer rela-
tions employees of the new AT&T system. I
like doing that type of program for big
business because they pay so well, and I
plow their entire fee back into this depart-
ment. The money that I'll be receiving from
the phone company could well pay the sal-
ary of one of my employees for a month."
Esther Shapiro was born in Chicago.
She came to Detroit with her husband dur-
ing World War II when he was transferred
here by his union. Because of the acute
wartime housing shortage, they first lived
in a public housing project.
Married 44 years, the Shapiros have
two children — a son, Mark, 38., lives in the
Detroit area, and daughter Andrea, 40,
lives outside of Chicago — and three
grandchildren: Nicky, 8; Matthew, 7; and
Evelyn, 5. The latter two are Andrea's. --
Prior to entering the consumer affairs
field, Mrs. Shapiro was recruitment direc-
tor for the Office of School Volunteers, De-
troit Board of Education. From 1966 until
her Aug. 1, 1974 appointment by Mayor
Young, she served as consumer specialist
fOr the Michigan Credit Union League, a
statewide organization representing a mil-
lion and a half members. There, she
created consumer education programs and
wrote a syndicated monthly magazine col-
umn.
Mrs. Shapiro is a past president of the
Consumer Federation of America, a foun-
der and former president of the Consumer
Alliance of Michigan and a vice president
of the National Consumers League. The
Shapiros live in downtown Detroit.
Mrs. Shapiro's agency is unique in
that it is one of the few city departments
run by two women. Her deputy is Vera V.
Griffith, a highly-respected black
educator. "For a while," recalled Shapiro,
"my department was getting only female
employees and I actually had to put in a
formal request for a white male just for
balance."

.

;

-





:SI 1

He warned, however, that
the need to divert attention
from an internal power
struggle might tempt the
Syrians to warlike adven-
tures.

Shtetl topic of
Haar lecture

"The Shtetl in Fact and
Fiction" will be the topic of
Dr. David Roskies when he
delivers the annual Moishe
Haar Memorial Lecture to
the Sholem Aleichem Insti-
tute at 7:30 p.m. May 6 in
the LaMed Auditorium of
the main United Hebrew
Schools building.
Dr. Roskies is associate c,
professor of Jewish litera-
ture at the Jewish Theologi-
cal Seminar of America.
The public is invited free
of charge.

i

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