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April 06, 1984 - Image 73

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1984-04-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

friday,-'Ajj t":1984 73

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

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rather than proposing revo-
lutionary ideologies."
It was only in his old age
that DuBois turned to
Communism; Kallen, on the
contrary, late in his career
opposed Communism be-
cause of its totalitarian
practices.
The career of each of them
is discussed at some length.
DuBois' relations with
blacks as well as his own in-
tellectual development is
stressed. Kallen, while at
Harvard, came under the
influence of William James,
became his favorite student
and assistant, and em-
braced James' philosophy of
pragmatism. As a - Jew,
however, not all academic
doors were open to him and
he accepted a place on the
faculty of the liberal Uni-
versity of Wisconsin. He
early became a Zionist and
took an active part in
Jewish activities.
After 1918, Kallen joined
the newly-established New
School of Social Research
and remained there to the
end of his long life. In time
he propounded the philos-
ophy of a pluralistic society,
which extended to society
the freedom which religious
experience provided the in-
dividual.
Ralph Melnick's Ludwig
Lewisohn: The Early Char-
leston Years, deals with the
youthful development of
Ludwig, who was born in
Berlin in 1882 and brought
to South Carolina in 1890.
The family came to St.
Mathews, where they were
welcomed by Mrs.
Lewisohn's brother. Jaques
Lewisohn, like so many
Jews born in Germany, was
deeply Germanic in outlook.

`Equal access'
bill seen as
unconstitutional

Washington — Proposed
congressional legislation
giving religious clubs -
"equal access" to public
school facilities with other
student organizations could
lead to a religious divisive-
ness or added pressure on
students of minority reli-
gions, according to the
American Jewish Congress.
Citing a resolution passed
during the group's conven-
tion in Baltimore last week,
AJCongress executive
committee member Barry
Ungar said that "the bill .. .
would introduce into the
public schools the very dan-
gers the First Amendment
to the Constitutiori seeks to
avoid."

AWACS pledge

New York — The Na-
tional Council of Young Is-
rael (NCYI) has urged all
candidates for the
Presidency to pledge to
withhold the 1985
scheduled delivery a ship-
ment of AWACS airplanes
to Saudi Arabia.
NCYI President Harold
Jacobs issued the request at
the organization's 72nd an-
niversary banquet in New
York last week.

An agnostic and a lover of
books, he was a poor busi-
nessman. He had failed in
Berlin and soon failed in St.
Mathews. Moving to Char-
leston, he made a meager
living as a salesman.
There being no public
schools then, Ludwig was
enrolled in a Methodist
school, but he found the
teacher uncongenial to him
and persuaded his mother to

Horace Kallen
teach him at home. He early
became an avid reader, and
was able to enter high
school at the age of 11 and
college at 15.
He also began to write in
his early teens and was an
excellent student. All the
while he was a loner,
though not by choice. Even
though he attended Sunday
school and considered him-
self a Methodist, boys
thought of him as a Jew and
taunted him accordingly.
Eager as he was to teach
English on graduating from
college at 19, he was re-
jected as a Jew.

The final essay, The Two
Sons' in America: David
Ben-Gurion and Yitzhak
Ben Zvi, and the Formation
of Hechalutz, 1915-1916, by
Shabtai Teveth, describes
the experiences of these two
dedicated Zionists during
their sojourn in the United
States and their efforts to
organize a Hechalutz — an
army of pioneers to migrate
to Palestine and help de-
velop it into the future
homeland. They were
favorably received by the
New York Poale Zion organ-
ization and were assisted in
visiting American cities to
seek enlistments for their
project.

Hungarians
will mark
Holocaust

Jerusalem — Several
thousand Hungarian-
speaking Jews from all over
the world will gather in
Jerusalem in July, forty
years after the attempted
Nazi destruction of Hunga-
rian Jewry.
The First World Confer-
ence of Hungarian-
speaking Jews aims to reun-
ite a community shattered
by Nazi persecution; to
highlight the contribution
of Hungarian Jews to all
areas of human achieve-
ment and endeavor; and to
preserve the ancient heri-
tage of the Jews of Hungary.

In 1915, American Poale
Zionists were poor immig-
rants who dreamt of a fu-
ture Israel but had neither
the means nor the will to
enlist in a semi-military
organization. C o n-
sequently , neither of the
two organizers had much
success in their travels, at-
tracting only small audi-
ences and gaining few re-
cruits. In the end they
gained a hundred doubtful
recruits. In 1916, the
Hechalutz was disbanded.
As is most often the case,
the writing in a collection of
this kind tends to be un-
even, with some studies
well organized and clear in
exposition; in others the fac-
tual material has not been
well organized, or discussed
effectively.
In the Lewisohn study, for
instance, more is made of
the influence on Ludwig in
St. Mathews, where he lived
less than two years, than in
Charleston, where he re-
mained ten years.
Too much is said about
the elder Lewisohn's failure
as a businessman. The
study of the Jewish migra-
tion also suffers from too
much detail and poor organ-
ization; and the study of the
Scopes trial measures up
neither in content nor in
treatment to some of the
other studies.
The volume as a whole,
however, is a worthy addi-
tion to certain aspects of
American Jewish history.

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