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March 30, 1984 - Image 84

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1984-03-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

84

Friday, March 30, 1984

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

VERSATILE sophisticated party
music. Call 326-6995.

What's News?

Education: brings

SINGING Guitarist, Strolling Vio-
linist. Specializing senior parties.
Jewish-Modern. 661-2357.

A student writes . . . and is
nswered with scholarships

The joy of learning
a life-long experience



.. .

"ugh

Education is a life-long process. not something which can
contained within the walls of any school, however distinguis
It is as much a territory for adults as children — there is
limit on curiosity, Pity the person who truly believes that.
she has nothing more to learn, because that person has ce •
gmw!
People learn by a variety of methods. Book-k
course, chief among them — as is the interchange of
facts among people, teacher to pupil, pupil to ti*
mostly, people learn by opening themselves to
them. by allowing their senses to interpret
leaving their ports open, metaphorically.
that nature and art and erudition have 4
Whether your interests lie in
specific areas, or whether you
are enthralled by everything
the world has to offer, there's
one precept always to keep in
mind: There is nothing so
small it's not worth learning,
nothing so large. it's not worth
tackling.

it."
Mary Ann Maxin, Execu-
of:* Student
, said that
hundreds
nts have
s ranging
a year
Scholarship

‘.4

1:100 computer-
• bank con-
Amor awards,
vale ly -funded
rit) sources
t
trust funds,
Ms religious

°awards

and

Perfect pi

Capturing the spirit of sun*?
mer in photographs can be
oasy as frolicking in the suit
when you follow a few sim
tips on picture-taking.
No matter how ideal
lighting and other condit
ultimately the quality of
pictures depends on the. TO
you handle your c
Although many o
new cameras are e
what appears in the
is the result of how
pose the shot.
One of the greatest adv
tages- of an instant camera
that you can see your results
immediately. You can tell
right away when you took the
time to compose a shot in the
viewfinder or when you need
to try again.
The new Kodamatie 970L

cific money sources. A modest
additional computer process-
ing fee is required at the time
the student sends in his or her
application form.
Applicants can often qualify
for privately-donated college
funds in the Scholarship
Search data base, because cer
tain eligibility factors are im-
portant• such as: religion, eth-
nic background. career
interest, college majors, extra-
curricular school or civic ac-
tivities, parents unions, mili-
tary service, etc.
She said, "Millions and
millions of dollars of school
aid have gone unclaimed and
unused in the past 10 years,
because the money was not
claimed. Computers are es-
sential to find the myriad of
vailable scholarships.
arching a high school
or senior with a scholar-
manually would be virtu-
impossible, especially
dealing with hundreds
thousands of students,
each one very, very dif-
"
said the Council has
MOte than 100,000 stu-
in the 10,12 years, lo-
ating.....setti:ets of college

...

for information

:itiformation and assist-
40 tracking down money
. rtollege• write to . . . Stu-
dent Assistance Council Col-
lege Funds at their new ad-
dress, 800 Huyler Street,
Teterboro, NJ 07608, enclos-
ing 51.00 to cover postage and
handling.
"Cole wrote. And he was
answered . . . good!" Maxin
smiled.

.

.

. .....
covet • Flitt

mitt:fling

e for

guar-
5 spe-

for fall '82

Welcome to the wide-

ype r-
fore,
tistics,
mupby
:faShionable
antlers for

Museum

Rough and rugged, alway
ready. the American cow
is a "superhero" unique to
American culture. With
wide open, western plains
his proving ground, he is
nowned for his courage
fortitude in the face of danger
To preserve the memory
these western champions .0
the past and honor the he

enney is
ellection of
possible
I need
rotor pal-
tones,
voltage

brights to blend with
sportwear.
You'll also find the newest
stripes, Fair Isle and jacquard
sweater patterns in both
acrylic ar.d wool blends.
Different lengths in legwar-
mers are also at JCPenney.
The classic over-the-knee
dancer style is joined this sea-
son by a shorter version that
stops at the knee and may be
cuffed over the top of your
boots.

•• •

`News' means different things to different people and the one
place where all the people will find all the `news' they're looking
for . . . is in the newspaper! It's business and sports, coupons
and classifieds, and much, much, more. This week and through-
out the year, take advantage of the many facts and features that
the newspaper has to offer. It's for you!

r

owsommimeamsommassomminimas womesommiNsm

IM

IMO

The Jewish News
17515 W. 9 Mile Rd., Suite 865
Southfield, Mich. 48075-4491

Gentlemen:

Please send a (gift) subscription to:

NAME

ADDRESS

STATE ....ZIP ... .

CITY

From

$18 enclosed

MI UM •

1•1

MR NM IN OM MID

If gift state occasion

11111 In OS 1= in OM In MB MN MI 111111 Ell NM MS MB NB NB NS IN UM MI MI MI MI HMI INS I=

IT'S DE-LIMIT,
IT'S DE-LUXE,
IT'S DE-LOVELY.
I will play and sing the
great tunes from the
20s, 30s, _40s and
provide my own
piano.

JEFF LINDAU
Piano/Song Stylist

646-9531 (after 6)

53—ENTERTAINMENT

BIRTHDAY PARTIES

And other Special Occasioes.
273-6718
Clowns, juggling, magic,
music dance, Puppets,
balloon sculpture.

BRIGHTEN YOUR PARTY

With Computer photographs
taken of $1,000,000 bills,
puzzles, t-shirts & more.

"your guests won't forget!"

Call 652-6163
for details

Prof's computer local
prevents software theft

REHOVOT — Software
program piracy has become
the sourge of the computer
industry. However, Weiz-
mann Institute Prof. Adi
Shamir has developed a sys-
tern that, when widely
adopted, promises to pro-
vide program manufactur-
ers with a cheap, highly ef-
fective "lock," designed to
keep pirates and pilferers
out.
Last year, software pro-
gram production in the U.S.
alone generated $1 billion
in sales. As personal home
and business computers be-
come increasingly popular,
a market is burgeoning for
software diskettes — corn-
puter programs inside
pieces of plastic shaped like
45 rpm records. But, as hap-
pened earlier with record
albums and videotapes,
program piracy based on in-
expensive blank diskettes
has become a popular pas-
time with computer hob-
byists.
In addition, program ren-
tals by independent outlets
contribute to financial los-
ses already estimated at
$500,000 annually. This not
only forces small companies
out of business, but results
in higher consumer costs.
Attempts to develop a
pirate-proof system have so
far failed.
Prof. Shamir, whose 1982
cracking of a supposedly
unbreakable Stanford com-
puter coding system earned
him the attention of the
world press, advocates mod-
ification of the disk drives
used by software companies
so that the drive will pro-
duce marginal strength
pulses in selected locations
in the program. These
pulses manifest themselves
by non-deterministic be-
havior i.e., sometimes they
read as a zero and some-
times as one.
While home computers
are designed to read weak
pulses, and thus use the
programs, they are not
equipped to introduce these
weak pulses into re-
recordings. Thus, any at-
tempt to copy the original
diskette will eliminate the
weak pulses and be detecta-
ble. Should this situation be
detected by the computer, it
will refuse to run.
The same technique may
also be employed to limit
the number of times that
rented diskettes can be

Adi Shamir

used. Each time a program
is run, the user's disk drive
will override a block of weak
pulses with standard pulses
of its own. Each overridden
block can be considered as a
"coupon" which has been
used up, and the number of
runs is limited by the origi-
nal number of the "coupons"
on the diskette.
The rental company can
thus charge users per run,
rather than on a flat rate
basis —the latter currently
employed system being
inherently unfair, both to
software companies and to
customers.
This system, likewise
applicable to software that
is distributed over the tele-
phone by commercial data-
base systems, will not only
protect software manufac-
turers from blatant theft,
but also will provide a boon
for those wishing for only
limited — and Consequently
inexpensive — use of a
given program.

"The beauty of the sys-
tern," says Prof. Shamir, "is
that it is cheap to imple-
ment and does not require
modifcation of home com-
puters already on the mar-
ket." Yeda Research and
Development Co. at the
Weizmann Institute of Sci-
ence has applied for patents
in regard to Prof. Shamir's
locking technique.

National Search

New York (JTA) — A
nation-wide search to find
outstanding examples of
service to the elderly by
synagogues and churches
has been launched by the
Third Age Center of For-
dham University.

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