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March 30, 1984 - Image 70

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1984-03-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

10 Friday, March 30, 1984

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

DIAMOND DESIGN

NATIONAL COUNCIL OF JEWISH WOMEN

Manufacturing Jewelers
• Ear Piercing On Saturdays.
• DIAMOND DESIGN WILL CUSTOM MANUFACTURE
• IN 3 DAYS, IN ANY LANGUAGE, IN 14 KT. GOLD!
• Minor Repairs While You Wait
Major Credit Cards
HUNTERS SQUARE 31025 Orchard Lake Rd. 855-7911

GREATER DETROIT 5Ecrtom

PRESENTS; FOR 19

Vet.
PROGRAM

at 14 Mile Rd.

The following 4 questions

WHY SEDERAMA 84?
WHEN SEDERAMA 84?
WHAT SEDERAMA 84?
WHO SEDERAMA 84?

IrALY

G./tow

BRITAIN

will be answered on page 32

ISRAEL

WELCOME SPRING.

Continuous Fashion Show!

Weds. & Thurs., April 4th & 5th, 1T-12:30 & 2-3:30

Jewish life exhibitions due

The story of the
mainstreaming of Ameri-
can Jewish immigrants into
their new society ebbs and
flows like the waves of im-
migration which brought
them to the U.S. One finds
brief periods of isolation fol-
lowed by easy integration.
This pattern is chronicled
in the nationally acclaimed
exhibition "Jewish Life in
America: Fulfilling the
American Dream" which
opens at the Detroit Histor-
ical Museum April 12 and
runs through April 29. A
complementary exhibition,
"Jewish Life in Michigan"
brings the story to a more
personal level. Both are
sponsored by the Anti-
Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith in celebration of its
70th anniversary.
The first Jewish immig-
rants to the New World, like
those to follow, came to es-
cape persecution. In 1654,
24 Sephardic Jews from
Brazil fleeing Portuguese
attacks received a cold re-
ception when they landed
on the shores of New
Amsterdam (later renamed
New York). It was only the
influence of the Dutch- West
India Co. which allowed
them to stay.
By the early 1800s Jewish
settlers had built a founda-
tion for those who followed.
They had demonstrated
that they could become an
integral part of American
society. However, the next
waves of Jewish immigra-
tion, in the late 1800s,
changed the character of
Jewish settlement in the
U.S.
These were almost all
Ashkenazi Jews from
Europe — first, northern
Europe, then, central and
eastern Europe. Rather
than wealthy merchants,
they were peddlers who
travelled to sell their wares,
eventually settling in
smaller towns. Then came
the laborers to fuel the
needs of industry. They con-
centrated in larger cities,
became part of the working
class, and lived in slums and
poverty, retaining their dis-

Col. Isaac Franks
tinctive European ways
which set them apart from
the American mainstream.
This mainstreaming ef-
fect, which continues to the
present, can be seen in
paintings and photographs
,which are part of the Jewish
life exhibitions. For exam-
ple, an 1802 Gilbert Stuart
painting of Col. Isaac
Franks, who served under
George Washington during
the Revolutionary War,
portrays him looking no
different than a gentile offi-
cer or merchant of the
period. But a 1920 family
photograph of three genera-
tions of the Freund family
graphically demonstrates
the process of acculturation
in America: the older gen-
eration with its European
look contrasts with the very
American fashions and ap-
pearance affecte.d by the
younger generations.
The history of 300 years of
Jewish immigration is
documented in "Jewish Life
in America" and "Jewish
Life in Michigan," showing
how the various conditions
in this country at the time of
settlement profoundly ef-
fected the character of their
adjustment. The ex-
hibitions are funded in pa-rt
by a grant from the Max M.
Fisher Jewish Community
Foundation, funded by the
United Jewish Charities.
Hours are 9:30 a.m. to 5
p.m., Wednesday through
Sunday. Call Leslie Dicks-
tein at ADL, 962-9686, for
information.

Forum on aging repeated

"When Is It My Turn: A
Survival Course for
Families with Aging Rela-
tives," sponsored by the
Jewish Home for Aged and
the Jewish Community
Center, will be held on April
25, May 2, 9, 16, 23, and 30
at the main Jewish Center
complex.
The lectures will be given
by professionals in the field
of aging and will deal with
such subjects as the physi-
cal, emotional, and finan-

An array of add-on pieces. Mix with one another,
and with favorites you already own. All of cotton
interlock. Ivory, black, red and taupe.

West Bloomfield

Lathrup Village

TACEGSETTEFC

Maple at Orchard Lake Road 11 Mile at Evergreen
851-9660
424-8750

FASHIONS

9,

cial aspects of aging as well
as an overview of aging and
alternatives and options
available in the community
for the elderly.
The workshops will be
lead by social workers
whose expertise is in the
field of gerontology.
Registration is limited.
For information, call Renee
Mahler, director of special
projects, at the Jewish
Home for Aged, 532-7112.
There is a registration fee.

Morris Branch seniors meet

Arnold Kimmel, vice
president for administra-
tion of Sinai Hospital, will
address the senior adults at
the Jimmy Prentis Morris
Branch of the Jewish Com-
munity Center at I p.m.
April 6 in room 13 of the
Morris Branch.
Kimmel will appear for
the senior adult depart-
ment's "Ask Your Agency"
series. All senior adults are
a
4
bt,%:

invited free of charge. For
information, call Miriam
Sandweiss, 967-4030.
The Morris Branch will
hold its volunteer recogni-
tion luncheon 12:30 p.m.
April 8 ,at the branch.
Communal leaders will
address the luncheon
guests. Entertainment will
highlight the afternoon and
Senior Adult Council offi-
cers will be installed.

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