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March 09, 1984 - Image 38

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1984-03-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

38 Friday, March 9, 1984

Talks Deemed Futile by Israelis, Positive by WB Leaders

JERUSALEM (JTA) —
Israeli officials char-
acterized the five days of
talks between King Hus-
sein of Jordan and Palestine
Liberation Organization
Chief Yasir Arafat as an
exercise of futility,

punctuated by the "empty
phrases" of the joint com-
munique they issued in
Amman at the end of last
week.
The officials said the
communique holding out
the prospects of further

Swing to the
sound of

J.C. HEARD

(12-piece)
Feb. 20 & 27
and every
Mon. in
March

talks in the months ahead
was a "smokescreen" to
cover the failure of Hussein
and Arafat to reach agree-
ment on any basic issues
and the two would not
guarantee success.
Nevertheless, Premier

Yitzhak Shamir was repor-
tedly involved in high level
consultations on reaction to
the Amman talks. Govern-
ment sources said the issue
was ';under examination."
Only last week, Shamir
reiterated his invitation to
Hussein to enter into peace
talks with Israel and re-
minded him that the ad-
dress "was not Israel, not
Arafat."
Publicly, Israeli offi-
cials flatly deny that they
are pleased or relieved
that the Hussein-Arafat
round of talks — like
their previous on _ e which
broke off last April —
produced no tangible re-
sults and no significant
breakthrough. But inde-
pendent observers here
believe that the Shamir
government cannot help
but be gratifled_by this
failure.
A true reflection of the
thinking in at least some
government circles was,
these observers say, the
warning last week by Sci-
ence Minister Yuval
Neeman, hardline leader of
the ultra-nationalist
Tehiya Party, that any
• Hussein-Arafat agreement
would pose a mortal danger
to Israel.
The Israelis, in any event,
have reiterated their re-
fusal to have dealings of any
kind; direct or indirect with
the PLO, under any circum-
stances. At the same time,
they stressed Arafat's
adamant position in his
talks with Hussein.
The PLO leader is still
balking at public ac-
ceptance of UN Security
Council Resolution 242
which is a key condition for
the U.S. to open a dialogue
with the PLO; he is still un-
willing to allow Hussein to
represent the Palestinians
in peace talks, they say.
With respect to some
sort of confederation be-
tween Jordan and a fu-
ture Palestin i an state on
the West Bank — an ele-
ment of President
Reagan's Sept. 1, 1982
peace proposals — Hus-
sein is not prepared to
contemplate such a
scheme based on equality
between the two entities.
Similarly, Arafat is not
prepared to agree to
Hussein's long-
advocated confederation
scheme in which Jordan
would be the dominant
partner, the Israelis said.
In contrast to the Israeli
view, several West Bank
leaders who were in
Amman and met with
Arafat and Hussein, char-
acterized their talks as
"very successful."

Maumoud Abu-Zuluf,
editor of the pro-Jordan
East Jerusalem Arabic
daily Al Kuds said the fact
that Arafat and the King
agreed to continue to pursue
a peace settlement jointly
indicated the importance
they give to a public opinion
in the occupied territories.

Rashad A-Shawa, the de-
posed mayor of Gaza who
was not permitted by Israeli

authorities to go to Amman, the West Bank demanded
said that the Hussein- that punitive measures be
Arafat talks were "a good taken against the West
prelude toward ending Is- Bank notables who met
rael's occupation" of the with Arafat in Amman in
territory. defiance of the govern-
Meanwhile, the Council ment's ban on such meet-
of Jewish Settlements on ings.

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