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February 24, 1984 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1984-02-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Condemning

Media Bias

as a Necessity

to Prevent

Its Repetition

THE JEWISH NEWS

A WeekIN Review

of Jewish Events

Israel in Grip

of Terrorized

Universe

With Mounting

Obstacles

Editorial, Page 4

Commentary, Page 2

Copyright c The Jewish News Publishing Co.

VOL. LXXXIV, No. 26

17515 W. Nine Mile, Suite 865, Southfield, MI 48075-4491

424-8833

$18 Per Year: This Issue 40c

February 24, 1984

Claims Its PLO Policies
_Are Consistent, Unchanged

Itj •

Jewish Life Exhibit
Is Coming to Detroit

Part of the "Jewish Life in Michigan" segment of
the Jewish Life in America exhibition is this photo-
graph of Ben and Max Ellias with a team of horses at
the ill-fated Palestine farming colony near Bad Axe
around the turn of the century.
*
The nationally-acclaimed exhibition "Jewish Life in
America: Fulfilling the American Dream" will be brought
to the Detroit Historical Museum April 12-29 to mark the
70th anniversary of the Anti-Defamation League of Bnai
Brith.
The exhibition contains photographs, documents,
paintings and memorabilia recording more than 300 years
of Jewish contributions to American society.
To complement the national exhibition, the ADL
Michigan region will focus on the state with "Jewish Life in
Michigan" chronicling the growth of the state's Jewish
community from the first known settler in the Upper
Peninsula in 1760 to the present.
"Jewish Life in America" and the Michigan seg-
ment have been divided into five chronological eras
representing significant waves of immigration to the
United States. The first period includes drawings,
documents and paintings covering the years 1654-
1819. It begins with the 23 Jewish settlers from Brazil
who, fleeing Portuguese persecution, arrived in the
(Continued on Page 10)

By DAVID FRIEDMAN

The Reagan Administration maintained Tuesday that it has been consistent
in its policy "both publicly and privately" not to recognize or negotiate with the Palestine Liberation
Organization until it accepts United Nations Security Council Resolutions 242 and 338 and Israel's right to
exist.
"There is no change in that," State Department deputy spokesman Alan Romberg stressed. "We said if
they do these things, then we'll talk to them. There is no change in that."
But Romberg would not discuss published reports that the Administration, over a nine-
month period ending in June 1982, conducted secret discussions through an intermediary with
PLO chief Yasir Arafat.
According to the published reports, the intermediary was John Mroz, a specialist on the Middle East
and the Soviet Union, who reportedly conducted the talks with the knowledge of then Secretary of State
Alexander Haig and Nicholas Veliotes, at the time Assistant Secretary of State for Near Eastern and South
Asian Affairs and now the U.S. Ambassador to Egypt.
Romberg said, "We havescontact with a variety of people who claim to have contact with the PLO." He
said that when they ask what they should tell the PLO, they are told to repeat the U.S. conditions.
Robert McFarlane, President Reagan's National Security Adviser, said on a television panel program
Sunday, the day the reports of the alleged secret U.S. contacts with the PLO were published, that he has no
personal knowledge of any such contact and I'm very confident the President was unaware of any such
contact if they took place." McFarlane, appearing on the ABC-TV This Week with David Brinkley"
program, said he Was "very puzzled" by the report.
Roberg had no comment on a report from Jerusalem of a Jordanian-Egyptian move to form
a Palestinian delegation that would include members of the PLO to participate in a resumption of
the autonomy talks with Israel, stalled for the past two years. The Israel Radio report said Israeli

WASHINGTON (JTA) —

(Continued on Page 5)

Arens Hits Lebanese Army Performance,
Defends Forays Against PLO Terrorits

JERUSALEM (JTA) — Israel Defense Minister Moshe Arens has sharply criticized the performance of the
and Shiite Moslem militias. In most cases, he said, the army did not put
Lebanese army in its recent battles with Druze
up a fight. Unlike the Druze and Shiites, the soldiers had no motivation, he told the Knesset's Foreign Affairs and
Security Committee on Wednesday.
Arens defended the recent policy of the Israel Defense Forces to send armored patrols north of the Awali River line.
purpose was to prevent the return of the Palestinian terrorists to territory evacuated by the IDF and the
He said the ,
fact that there are no terrorists facing Israeli soldiers is proof of its success.
At a press conference Tuesday, Arens insisted that Israeli military action north of the Awali and air
raids on terrorist targets were not intended to bolster the regime of President Amin Gemayel in Beirut. "We-
are not his ally. We do not even have diplomatic relations,". Arens said.
Observers interpreted his remarks as a reiteration of the Israeli government's claim that its policies and action in
Lebanon are intended solely to ensure the security of Israel's northern borders and have nothing to do with internal
Lebanese politics and internecine strife.
Arens said an IDF redeployment south of the Awali River was not contemplated "at this stage" but he did not rule
out the prospect. "The situation requires that we reconsider (our position) each month," he said. He rejected the idea
that Israel would remain in south Lebanon permanently or even indefinitely.
But for the present, the IDF must be there because there is no prospect of a Lebanese government which could
honor commitments to maintain security in the south, Arens said.
(Continued on Page 3)


Springer
Warns of Dangers If German Post Backs Story
Weapons Are Supplied to Saudi Arabia on Jackson's Slur

By AXEL SPRINGER

AXEL SPRINGER

(Editor's note: This article by German publisher Axel Springer first appeared
in Welt am Sonntag, Feb. 5, under the title, "The Rights of Israel and the Duty of the
Germans.")
One of the four essentials which I postulated in the late 1960s for the work of my
publishing house concerns the obligation to promote the reconciliation of Jews and non-
Jewish Germans and to stand for the vital rights of Israel.
These vital rights are far more than the mere "right to exist" that time and again
creeps up in political verbiage. Israel has a right to freedom, to the security of its demo-
cratic state, to safe borders and support against her enemies.
After the visit of Chancellor Kohl who, unlike his predecessor, did not keep Israel
waiting, I wonder: Does the policy of the free part of Germany live up to our special duty
toward the state of the Jews?
There have been lively discussions in Israel whether or not the Germans take heed of the
consequences of the past vis-a-vis the facts of the present — in a way that morale and
(Continued on Page 53)

NEW YORK (JTA) — The tense relations between the
American Jewish community and the Rev. Jesse Jackson
has been further strained in the last few days by an alleged
reference by the Democratic Presidential hopeful to Jews
as "Hymie" and to New York as "Hymietown," as well as to
his call on Jewish leaders to repudiate the tactics of some
Jewish groups that he said had tried to disrupt his election
campaign.
Jackson's remarks about "Hymie" or "Hymietown"
were reported by the Washington Post last week. But in a
meeting Tuesday he had "no recollection" of making these
statements.
But the Washington Post said it stood by its story
that Jackson made his remarks in a conversation with
reporter Milton Coleman in a cafeteria at the Wash-
(Continued on Page 6)

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