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February 03, 1984 - Image 19

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1984-02-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

Soviet Jew Gets Jail Sentence

NEW YORK (JTA) —
Moshe Abramov, a 28-
year-old Orthodox Jew from
the city of Samarkand, re-
ceived a three-year sen-
tence, according to informa-
tion obtained by the Na-
tional Conference on Soviet
Jewry. Unable to observe
Jewish dietary laws in
prison, he is subsisting on
only bread and water.
Abramov was arrested on
Dec. 19 on charges of
"hooliganism" and incarc-
erated in the town of
Katta-Kurgan about 100
kilometers from Samar-
kand.
His arrest followed a dis-
pute with local authorities
in which he was asked to
withdraw a request to emi-
grate to Israel, submitted in
1980. He refused to do so.
In a related develop-
ment, seven Soviet
Jewish refusniks have
been fired from their jobs
in the last few weeks, ac-
cording to the Union of
Councils for Soviet Jews.
They are:
Sasha Lein, Grigory Vas-
serman, Elimelech Rochlin,
Leonid Raskin, Yakov
Gorodetsky, Lev Furman
and Michael Zinaver.
Meanwhile, the Student
Struggle for Soviet Jewry
reported that prisoner of
conscience Anatoly
Shcharansky, jailed at the
notorious Chistopol Prison,
is dangerously thin and has
more ailments than prev-
iously known. According to
the SSSJ, Shcharansky suf-
fers from heart and head
pains and bone and spine
diseases.
It also was reported that a
Soviet Jew, now living in Is-
rael, has said that the KGB
— Soviet secret police —
had threatened him and his
sons in an effort to make
him write a false incrimina-

Scientists Plan
Winter Meeting

NEW YORK — The Asso-
ciation of Orthodox Jewish
Scientists will hold their
annual mid-winter confer-
ence in New York Feb.
17-19.

Lectures will be pre-
sented on modern and
halakhic considerations of
fertility and obstetrics, the
Jewish family, intermar-
riage, blood samples and
paternity, marriage coun-
seling and sex therapy,
Jewish philosophy on death
and life, and dream in-
terpretation and psychology
in the Talmud.

Sabbath Case

NEW YORK — The Na-
tional Jewish Commission
on Law and Public Affairs
(COLPA) and the American
Jewish Congress are aiding
a Connecticut store man-
ager who is contesting a
state supreme court ruling
striking down Connecticut
laws requiring workers to
be given time off on their
Sabbath.

The case is now pending
before the U.S. Supreme
Court.

tion of Shcharansky.
The New York Times re-
ported:
The incident took place
in 1977, according to
Boris Zavurov, when the
KGB was putting to-
gether its case against
Shcharansky.
Shcharansky was con-
victed of treason and
given a 13-year prison
sentence.
President Carter de-
fended him, publicly deny-
ing Soviet charges that the
activist had worked for the
Central Intelligence
Agency. The case had ad-
verse effects on Soviet-
American relations and
contributed to a weakening
of the dissident movement.
Zavurov, a veteran of
World War II, said he had
not told the story of the
threats before because he
was afraid for relatives re-
maining in the Soviet
Union. His last son to re-
ceive permission to emi-
grate arrived in Israel sev-
eral months ago, he said in a
recent interview.
The .trouble began in
1975, he said, when two of
his sons, Amnon and
Amber, applied for exit
visas and received them.
Then, without explanation,
the documents were with-
drawn.
As required by law, the
two had renounced their
Soviet citizenship and re-
linquished their identity
papers, including their
internal passports, in ex-
change for their exit
visas. When the
authorities tried to give
their Soviet papers back
to them, Amnon and
Amner said, they decided
to refuse in an effort to
make the bureaucracy
uncomfortable.
In pressing their case,
they explained, they went to
Moscow and met
Shcharansky, who ar-
ranged a news conference
where they could tell
foreign correspondents
their story.
There followed nearly two
years of harassment, re-
peated interrogations and
short-term detentions, they
said, culminating in the ar-
rest in November 1976 of
Amner in Dushanbe, the
Central Asian city where
the family was living. He
was sentenced to 31/2 years
in prison on charges of vio-
lating passport regulations
and hooliganism.
Several months later,
Boris Zavurov recalled,
after articles appeared in
the government newspaper
Izvestia alleging that
Shcharansky and other dis-
sidents were associated
with American intelligence,
the father was summoned
by the KGB and urged to
agree to put his name on a
similar Izvestia story that
would be written for him.
In addition, he said
KGB officials asked him
to incriminate Joseph
Pressel, an American
diplomat in Moscow
whose duty was to main-
tain contacts with dissi-
dents. "They said, If you

tell us that Pressel is an
anti-Soviet character, we
will free Amner,' "
Zavurov said, "and if
you don't, we will arrest
Amnon.' " He said he re-
fused.
Shortly
thereafter,
Shcharansky was arrested.
Then, Amnon said, the KGB
started to work on him.
They summoned Amnon
and urged him to meet
Pressel on a Moscow street
and give him a gift of a cop-
per plaque that he had
made, apparently in an ef-
fort to set up the diplomat.
Dina Beilin, a dissident
who also lives in Israel now,
said she advised Amnon
against it, and he did refuse.
KGB officials then told
Amnon that if he told any-
one what the secret police
had asked him to do, Amner
would be killed in prison.
Amnon received permis-
sion to leave the Soviet
Union in 1978. Boris and
Amner arrived in 1982,
after Amner was released
from prison. The youngest
brother, Ilya, came last fall.

Friday, February 3, 1984



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19

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