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January 27, 1984 - Image 32

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1984-01-27

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

32 Friday, January 21, 1984 THE DETROIT JEWISH NEW

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NEW YORK — The Pre-
cious Legacy: Judaic Trea-
sures from the Czechos-
lovak State Collections,"
the landmark exhibition
which attracted record
attendance at the Smithso-
nian Institutions in Wash-
ington, D.C., will begin a
stay of more than four
months at the Jewish
Museum in New York on
April 15.
Consisting of nearly 300
objects seen in the U.S. for
the first time, "The Precious
Legacy" is the result of 15
years of negotiations by
Mark E. Talisman, director
of Project Judaica, to bring
the exhibition to this coun-
try from Czechoslovakia. It
was organized by the

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Exhibit Ignored

LONDON — The Inter-
national Council of Jews
from Czechoslovakia re-
ports that the landmark
U.S. exhibit of Czech Jewish
artifacts has received abso-
lutely no publicity in
Czechoslovakia.

WASHINGTON (JTA) —
The joint U.S.-Israel
political-military negotiat-
ing group on strategic coop-
eration met for the first
time in Washington this
week for two days of talks.
The American team is
headed by Rear Admiral
Jonathan Howe, director of
Political-Military Affairs at
the State Department.
According to the Israel
Embassy, the Israeli team is
headed by Menahem Me-
ron, Director General of the
Defense Ministry. It in-
cludes Hanan Bar-On, De-
puty Director General of the
Foreign Ministry, and Is-
rael's Ambassador to the
U.S., Meir Rosenne.
Neither the State De-
partment nor the Embassy
would provide details of the
agenda.

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Smithsonian Institution
Traveling Exhibition Serv-
ice.
"The Precious Legacy"
will be on,view at the Bass
Museum of Art in Miami
Beach through March 18.
Following its closing at the
Jewish Museum on Aug. 26,
the exhibition will travel to
the San Diego Museum of
Art, Sept. 22-Nov. 18; the
New Orleans Museum of
Art, Dec. 15, 1984-Feb. 10,
1985; the Detroit Institute
of Arts, March 12-May 5,
1985; and the Wadsworth
Atheneum in Hartford,
June 3-July 29, 1985.

Over three generations of service, value,
confidence & professionalism

Boris Smolar's

`Between You
. . . and Me'

Editor-in-Chief
Emeritus, JTA

(Copyright 1984, JTA, Inc.)

INSIDE UJA: The United Jewish Appeal started its
1984 program with certain structural changes and with
changes in the administration. The major administration
change is the appointment of Stanley B. Horowitz, execu-
tive head of the Jewish Community Federation in Cleve-
land, to the position of UJA president. This is the first time
in UJA history that a federation professional was chosen
for the post. His appointment indicates the strong relation-
ship prevailing between the leadership of UJA and the
Council of Jewish Federations.
There was a time when relations between the federa-
tion leadership and UJA leadership were cool and formal.
This is no longer the case. It all changed when Max M.
Fisher of Detroit served as CJF president from- 1969 to 1972
and previously as UJA national chairman. He saw the UJA
and the federations as two sides of the same coin in Ameri-
can Jewish communal life, and succeeded in building
bridges between the two. Since then, the relationship be-
tween the CJF and UJA became stronger with every year.
The federations, as the organized Jewish communities,
have always been the financial backbone of UJA. But there
are also about 430 very small, non-federated communities
that are reached by UJA directly for contributions. More
than 80 percent of the total fund-raising conducted by the
organized communities come, however, from 32 major
cities with annual contributions of $3 million or more to the
local Jewish federations.
About 15 percent come from approximately 50 cities
which contribute each to their local federations between
$1 million and $3 million in the annual campaign. Some
small federations and the small non-federated com-
munities account for five percent of the total annual fund-
raising campaign. The UJA gets from the federations more
than 60 percent of the funds they raise.
The CJF, working in full cooperation with the UJA,
has established a Campaign Planning Advisory Committee
to strengthen federation-UJA local campaigns. There is
now a CJF-UJA liaison committee maintaining communi-
cation on common concerns. The CJF and UJA have 10
representatives each on this body. There are also other
areas in which the federations and the UJA are now close to
each other.
This spirit of becoming more and more the two sides of
the same coin has obviously led the UJA leadership to
appoint Horowitz as UJA president. A new UJA national
chairman will be formally elected in May. He has already
been named unofficially: Alexander Grass of Harrisburg,
Pa., vice president of UJA and chairman of the Israel Edu-
cation Fund established by the UJA. He is also a board
member of the American Jewish Joint Distribution Com-
mittee.

THE REGIONAL OFFICES: Of the structural
changes in the UJA, the most outstanding is the recon-
struction of UJA's field operations. This change was
recommended by the UJA senior management last year
following an assessment of the giving patterns and atti-
tudes of contributors and non-contributors. Consultations
were also held with a substantial number of leaders of
federations.
As a result, .the UJA's eight regional offices were re-
duced to a give-region structure. The five regional offices
will be located in New York City, Chicago, Los Angeles,
Dallas and Deerfield Beach, Fla.

LAWRENCE M ALLAN

President

`Terror Becoming a Weapon'

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WASHINGTON (JTA) —
Secretary of State George
Shultz charged Sunday that
terrorism is emerging "as a
kind of weapon of war by
states" and identified Iran,
Syria, Libya and the Soviet
Union as countries that em-
ploy it or acquiesce in its
use.
Shultz made his remarks
in an appearance on the
ABC-TV "This Week With
David Brinkley" program
during which he denounced
international terrorism as
"an attack on civilization"
and "we have to be very con-
cerned about it."
Asked if the U.S. might'
launch a preemptive strike
against possible kamikaze-
type attacks on American

warships or bases in the
Middle East, Shultz replied:
"I think we have to be
very conscious of the rise
in terrorism, not only in
Lebanon but around the
world and the fact that it
is increasingly evident
that it has a base in a state
— it isn't some random
crazy group. It is or-
ganized, systematic,
people get trained for it
and in the case of Leba- -
non, we increasingly see
these things originating
in Iran.
"We see them taking
place necessarily with the
acquiescence of Syria. We
see who this group is —
there's Syria, Iran, Libya
and the Soviet Union."

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