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January 20, 1984 - Image 23

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1984-01-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

Better Mobility for Handicapped
Is Goal of Technion Scientists

HAIFA — In order to con-
struct artificial limbs that
mimic nature's perfect de-
sign, bio-medical engineers
at the Technion-Israel In-
stitute of Technology are
studying how our limbs re-
spond to stress, pressure,
and other mechanical
forces.
One of the problems fac-
ing these researchers is that
the mechanics of movement
are so complex that a tangle
of variables must be taken
into account before artifi-
cial limbs can be engineered
to be both functional and
comfortable.
Dr. Rahamim Seliktar,
associate professor at the
Technion's Julius Silver In-
stitute of Bio-Medical
Engineering, has condensed
the many ways engineers
measure movement into six
major categories. These
categories give a much sim-
pler and clearer description
of how an artificial limb
must function in a way eas-
ily understood by doctors
and technicians. "In addi-
tion," says Prof. Seliktar, "it
also lets us modify prosthe-

tic devices along objective
criteria, rather than relying
solely on the subjective view
of the patient."
Understanding of how
limbs function, coupled
with advances in medical
electronics, are making
artificial limbs more
"lifelike" than ever be-
fore. However, current
designs of artificial arms
are awkward because
they involve a cable grip
controlled by the muscles
of the user's shoulder.
The amputee must rely
solely on his sight to
know how far the artifi-
cial limb is extended or
how much force is being
exerted to grasp an ob-
ject. The complicated
maneuver of reaching for
a glass and grasping it is
a difficult skill to master,
says Prof. Seliktar, and
often results in such
acute embarrassment
that the user often pre-
fers not to use the
mechanical appendage.

Friday, January 20, 1984 23

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an artificial appendage that
is activated by electrical
feedback generated by the
patient's own nervous sys-
tem. Tiny sensors im-
planted in the amputee's
joint send back electronic
signals to the user, telling
him how far his artificial
arm is outstretched. Pow-
ered by an external power
pack worn as a vest, the de-
vice enables the handi-
capped person to better con-
trol the strength and de-
xterity of his mechanical
arm and hand.

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Researchers at the Techn-
ion are experimenting with

A Technion researcher tests a mechanical elbow
mechanism on a mannequin. Scientists at Technion's
Silver Institute of Bio-Mechanical Engineering are
studying how limbs respond to stress and other
mechanical forces so that improvements can be made
in the design of artificial limbs for the handicapped.

Miami Beach Kosher Food
Inspector's Post Debated

the city too much money.
Others contend that a
grOup of Orthodox rabbis
could do a better job of
policing businesses that
sell kosher foods, the
Times said.
Gross said 22 people had
applied for the city inspec-
tor's job, which entails keep-
ing tabs on about 125
businesses. Rob Parkins,
the city manager, has indi-
cated he will make a deci-
sion on the fate of the job
this month, the Times re-
ported.

The Piaget Polo is recognized for its distinctive
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Doves and Hawks

JERUSALEM (ZINS) —
According to a recent Public
Opinion Research Institute
poll, 38.4 percent of the Is-
raeli public classify them-
selves as "doves," 21.1 per-
cent classify themselves as
"hawks," 7.7 percent placed
themselves in between and
32.8 percent refused to give
their opinion.

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MIAMI BEACH — The
city's effort to fill a
$25,000-a-year kosher food
inspector's post has sparked
a debate in this resort and
retirement community on
the rationale for having
such a position, the New
York Times reported.
Since the late 1960s,
Miami Beach has had a
kosher food inspector check-
ing stores, restaurants and
hotels. According to the
Times, the last occupant of
the job, Rabbi Joseph
Kaufman, was fired by the
city in 1983.
"We're very concerned
that the Jewish resident
and the tourists that come
down here receive the food
they believed they were
purchasing," Edward Gross,
assistant city manager said.
Gross also indicated that
Florida law prohibits false
and deceptive advertising.
However, some people
in the city of 97,000 have
complained the job costs

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