100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

The University of Michigan Library provides access to these materials for educational and research purposes. These materials may be under copyright. If you decide to use any of these materials, you are responsible for making your own legal assessment and securing any necessary permission. If you have questions about the collection, please contact the Bentley Historical Library at bentley.ref@umich.edu

November 18, 1983 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1983-11-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

A Political
Dilemma:
Duty to Lend
Strength to
Black-Jewish
Relations

THE JEWISH NEWS

A Weekly Review

Commentary, Page 2

of Jewish Events

Thanksgiving
Blessings

Israel Meets
Economic
Problems

Editorials, Page 4

Copyright © The Jewish News Publishing Co.

VOL. LXXXIV, No. 12 1.7515 W. Nine Mile, Suite 865, Southfield, Mich. 48075 424-8833

$18 Per Year: This Issue 40c

November 18, 1983

Amnesty International Cites
Torture Methods of Syrians

Hebrew U. Dedicates
New Zuckerman Hall

Shown at the Hebrew University dedication of the Zucker-
man Hall are, from left, Leah Rabin and MK Yitzhak Rabin,
Vivian Dinitz and Hebrew U. vice president Simcha Dinitz. Helen
Zuckerman is fourth from the right and Paul Zuckerman second
from right.

* * *

JERUSALEM — "In training the men and women who will one
day run Israel's commercial and industrial enterprises, the Hebrew
University School of Business Administration is an integral part of the
process which Israel will need and profit by to achieve economic inde-
pendence."
This was stated by Detroit industrialist and Jewish leader Paul
Zuckerman last month at a ceremony dedicating the Helen and Paul
Zuckerman Hall in the Hebrew University's School of Business Ad-
ministration on its Mount Scopus campus in Jerusalem.
Leadership from Israeli politics, business and the arts were pre-
sent at the luncheon hosted by University Chancellor Avraham Har-
man in honor of the Zuckermans.

Among the guests were MK and Mrs. Yitzhak Rabin, Mrs.
Rachel Dayan, Gen. (Res.) and Mrs. Amos Horev and ranking
figures from the United Jewish Appeal and the Jewish Agency.
U.S. Ambassador Samuel. Lewis was unable to attend at the last
moment and sent a message of congratulations.

Zuckerman is a member of the Jewish Agency's board of directors,
a past chairman of the UJA and a governor of the Hebrew University.
Last year he was awarded the university's honorary fellowship.
The School of Business Administration, sponsored by the Israel
Discount Bank Foundation, offers undergraduate and graduate studies

NEW YORK — Syrian security forces are responsible for systematic violations of human
rights, including torture and political killings, according to Amnesty International. A new
report by the human rights organization says a network of Syrian security services act with
impunity under the country's emergency decrees and "no one can depend on the protection of the
law."
The 65-page "Report from Amnesty International to the Government of the Syrian Arab
Republic" released last week cites overwhelming evidence that thousands of people have been
harassed and wrongfully detained without chance of appeal and in some cases tortured and
killed by security forces.
Those arbitrarily arrested may be held without charge or trial for years. Amnesty
International says it has been working this year for the release of 17 people held in
preventive detention for over 12 years and another 300 held for between two and nine
years.
The report refers to cases of relatives being held hostage while security forces sought
political suspects. Such hostages, it says, have included wives and young children. In one case,
three relatives were held hostage in detention for nine years before being released in 1980.
Torture is often inflicted during incommunicado detention, according to the report and "there is
no clear limit to the length of time detainees may be held incommunicado."
The report lists 23 methods of ill-treatment and torture reported by former detainees,
including electric shock, burning, whippings with braided steel cable, sexual violations and
forcing detainees to watch relatives being
tortured or sexually assaulted.
Extracts from testimony by 12 former
detainees who alleged torture are cited.
They include a 15-year-old schoolboy who
said he had been whipped and that his
TEL AVIV (JTA) — Israelis are reeling under
interrogator had threatened to gouge his
the impact of the 21.1 percent rise in the cost of living
index during October which was announced this
eyes out if he did not reveal his father's
week. The Central Bureau of Statistics forecasts an
whereabouts.
similar increase for November.
Another former detainee de-
The unprecedented increase, highest ever in any
scribes a sound-proof torture chamber
single month since Israel's establishment, more than
in Aleppo equipped with "torture
wiped out the gains of a 20.5 percent cost-of-living
tools," including electrical apparatus,
salary increase paid with October salaries only two
pincers, scissors, a machine used for
weeks earlier.
sexual violation and an implement for
There was a general mood of depression in in-
"ripping out fingernails."
dustrial, economic and business circles, with dire
forecasts of a deepening depression and rising un-
Amnesty International says the ex-
employment.
tent, consistency and detail of the allega-
The building index for the past three
tions which it has received persistently
months, issued Tuesday, also showed a sharp
over the years — some supported by medi-
increase. Contractors upped their apartment
cal evidence — "forces the organization to
costs by some 17 percent in line with the index
conclude that torture is frequently in-
increase, even though they acknowledged that
flicted in the course of interrogating ar-
any price increase would cut back even further

Record Inflation
Stuns the Israelis

(Continued on Page 3)

(Continued on Page 13)

(Continued on Page 11)

L= Barbie Atrocities and U.S. Complicity
in New Book on The Butcher of Lyon'

NEW YORK — In November 1942, Obersturmfuhrer Klaus Barbie became the Gestapo chief in Lyon,
France, ruthlessly crushing the French Resistance movement and sending thousands of Jews to their deaths.
Now imprisoned in the same city he once controlled, he will go on trial in 1984 in the first major prosecution of
a Nazi in almost two decades.
How Barbie maliciously used his power in Lyon during World War II, then evaded capture for 40 years
through the complicity of French collaborators, the American CIC, and finally the military dictators of
Bolivia, is the subject of a new book, "The Butcher of Lyon: The Story of Infamous Nazi Klaus Barbie" by
Brendan Murphy, which was published by Empire Books this week and distributed by Harper and Row. The
book has been chosen as an alternate selection by the Literary Guild.

In the preface of his new book, Brendan Murphy, a bilingual American journalist living in Paris,
states that if " 'The banality of evil' was how philosopher Hannah Arendt described the grotesque
ease with which Adolf Eichmann planned and carried out the systematic murder of six million
humans," then the story of Klaus Barbie is an example of the "utility of evil." Barbie, says Murphy,
was closer to the reality of the Nazi ethos. "He was one of those who pulled the trigger and shed
blood."

Barbie's survival, says Murphy, "required the complicity of virtually everyone with whom he came in
contact."
One of the major charges against Klaus Barbie in his upcom-
Klaus Barbie arrived in Lyon in late 1942 at the time that the Germans, angered by the Allied invasion of
ing trial is that he ordered these children and their adult super-
North Africa, had just reoccupied the city, which had been part of the Unoccupied Zone of France controlled by
visors deported from a French orphanage to the Nazi death
(Continued on Page 6)
camps.

ftiurnommfr

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan