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October 21, 1983 - Image 32

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1983-10-21

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

32 , :Friday, October 21, 1983

I

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

SAVE $5.00
SEE OVER 400 EXHIBITS OF
BUSINESS PRODUCTS & SERVICES

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,tro ,

Army Chaplains Have an Ancient Role

SM Reg

By ALLAN M. BLUSTEIN

Chaplain, Sinai Hospital

56 9-8 280

(Editor's note: Rabbi
Blustein is a former U.S.
Army chaplain.)

CONY HALL
NOV 1 -3 • 10am-7ptn DAILY

BRING THIS COUPON
SAVE $5 OFF REG. $10 ADMISSION

The Israelite army in
Bible times was always ac-
companied to the field by a

priest-chaplain. The first
such individual mentioned
in the Old Testament was
Phinehas, grandson of
Aaron, in the battle with
the Midianites (Numbers
21:6).
It was the duty of the

priest-chaplain to care for
the spiritual welfare of the
soldiers and, prior to the at-
tack, to encourage and in-
spire martial enthusiasm
(Deuteronomy 20:2-4). He
went into battle along with
the troops and attended the

The Eighth Annual Intercongregational Adult
Education
Institute
1983
5744

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Eight Tuesday Evenings Iwosteit

AND

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October 25-December 13

17/111
RUSH
BUSH
"UN
WAS
NOT 173 N
CONSUMED

The Conservative Rabbis of Metropolitan Detroit and Michigan Region of United Synagogue of America present

A Cooperative Study Program for the Jewish CommUnity.

Open Lecture - A Priest in Israel

Tues., Oct. 25, 1983 - Adat Shalom Synagogue, 8:00 p.m.

Father Marcel Dubois

Chairman, Department of Philosophy, Hebrew University

-

He has resided in Israel since 1962, he is a citizen of the State of Israel, the first non-Jew to hold the position of Chairman of the
Philosophy Department at Hebrew University.
Father Dubois is a member of the Vatican's Committee on the relationship of the Church to the Jewish people.
He has taught in both France and Israel and has published works in French, Hebrew and English.
Father Dubois will speak on "Being a Priest in Israel." Father Dubois is appearing through the generosity of both the Adult Study
Commission of Adat Shalom Synagogue and Mercy College.

The Institute will be held this year at Adat Shalom Synagogue 29901 Middlebelt Road. Far mi
Registrant
Registrant
A
B
Teacher
Course

Rabbi Abramson
Rabbi Arm
Rabbi Gamze
Rabbi Groner
Rabbi Nelson
Rabbi Paskind
Rabbi Rosenbaum
Rabbi Spectre
Midrasha
Midrasha

-

,

-

1

Inspirational °Selections from Psalms
Roots of Jewish Prayer

.

Jewish Ethics and Values and Modern Concerns
Searching the Prophets for Values
Abraham — Man of Vision
The Mishna: The Oral Law of Judaism
Is There a Jewish Culture?

Beginners Hebrew Language and Literature
Intermediate Hebrew Language and Literature

Registration on October 25,-7-8:00 p.m.

REGISTRANT A






Total $

REGISTRANT B

Synagogue or Temple Members @ $15 per person
Non-affiliated @ $20 per person
Hebrew class @ $5 additional per person
Senior citizens or full-time students @ $5 per person

Total $

Name

Address

City

Phone

Home

.
Congregational affiliation

Conservative Judaism

Name

Zip

Address

Work

City

Phone

Zip

Home

Work

Congregational affiliation

Checks should be made payable to Intercongregational Adult Educational Institute
ck Adat Shalom Synagogue 29901 Middlebelt Road, Farmington Hills, Michigan 48018
Institute Chairman: Rabbi Efry Spectre
Adat Shalom Coordinator: Charlotte K. Nussbaum

10111112111111111 •1111111111

■ MINSIIIIIIIIMIIIMMEanalt,

Ark of the Covenant which
was borne into combat by
the Israelite soldiers.
The priest-chaplain's
training prepared him to
counter the four techniques
used by most warring na-
tions to terrorize their
enemies: crashing shields,
sounding trumpets, shout-
ing battle cries and trampl-
ing with their horses.

The priest-chaplain
warned his troops
against these battle prac-
tices (Deuteronomy 20:3).
He exhorted his soldiers
to "let not your heart
faint (at the trampling of
the horses)," "fear not
(the crash of the
shields)," "nor be
alarmed (at the sound of
the trumpets)," and
"neither be ye affrighted
(at the sound of their bat-
tle cries)" — "for the Lord
your God is He that goes
with you . . . to save
you."

Bible commentators say
that the priest-chaplain ad-
dressed the troops twice,
once on the boundary of the
foe's land and once on the
battlefield itself. Before en-
tering enemy terrritory he
told who was qualified for
exemption from war,
namely, he who has built a
house but has not dedicated
it yet; he who has planted a
vineyard but has not tasted
of its fruit yet; he who is
fearful and fainthearted
(lest his cowardice melt his
brother's heart as it has his
own) (Deuteronomy 20:5-8).
It wasn't sufficient for the
priest-chaplain merely to
list' the criteria for exemp-
tion. He also had to be capa-
ble of determining the vari-
ous factors involved in each
particular case. The Tal-
mud elaborates on this
theme and makes even
further distinctions bet-
ween obligatory wars (those
commanded by Holy Writ
such as Joshua's in the con-
quest of Canaan) and volun-
teer wars (such as those
waged by the house of
David).
The priest-chaplain had
to be attuned to the needs of
his men so that he could bet-
ter assist and counsel them
as individuals. The job en-
tailed far more than just
leading the troops in prayer
for victory.
Today's army chaplain is
a worthy successor to his
ancient forebears, because
he too fills numerous and
vital roles in ministering to
his parish.

Torgerson Cited
Posthumously

LOS ANGELES — Dial
Torgerson, the Los Angeles
Times foreign correspon-
dent who was killed last
June while on assignment
in Honduras, has been post-
humously awarded the
Hubert H. Humphrey First
Amendment Freedom Prize
of the Anti-Defamation
League of Bnai Brith
(ADL).
The $10,000 award was
presented to Mr. Torger-
son's children, Christopher
and Jordan, at a luncheon
last week in Beverly Hills.

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