100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

The University of Michigan Library provides access to these materials for educational and research purposes. These materials may be under copyright. If you decide to use any of these materials, you are responsible for making your own legal assessment and securing any necessary permission. If you have questions about the collection, please contact the Bentley Historical Library at bentley.ref@umich.edu

September 30, 1983 - Image 25

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1983-09-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

Friday, September 30, 1983 25

Israel Lost Major Friend With Death of 'Scoop' Jackson

By MORRIS AMITAY

WASHINGTON — The
untimely and tragic passing
of Senator Henry M.
"Scoop" Jackson was un-
doubtedly a great loss to the
nation. But his steady sup-
port and contributions to Is-
rael's security for more than
a decade were even more
significant to the well-being
of that small, embattled
country.
I had the unique oppor-
tunity to work closely with
Scoop and his talented staff,
namely Dorothy Fosdick
and Richard Perle, since
early 1970 as a Senate staf-
fer for five years — and later
as head of the American Is-
rael Public Affairs Commit-
tee. I was able to witness the
development of his personal
and professional relation-
ship with then Israel's Am-
bassador, and later Prime
Minister, Yitzhak Rabin,
and Rabin's brilliant politi-
cal counselor, Amos Eiran.
This close friendship en-
dured until the day Scoop
died and formed the basis
for Scoop's leadership in the
Senate on issues affecting
Israel.
It was a natural rela-
tionship. Jackson, who

YOUR WEDDING—
BAR MITZVA

WHEN PHOTOGRAPHED BY

WINE

AND ASSOCIATES

357-1010

served in the House of
Representatives during
World War II, believed
that in dealing with un-
scrupulous enemies,
military strength — and
the willingness to use it—
was essential. Rabin, as
Chief of Staff during the
Six-day War embodied
daring and courage in de-
feating superior Soviet-
backed forces.
Both were geopoliticians
in the best sense of the word
— understanding that the
world was a dangerous
place for democratic
societies — and both were
able to analyze and articu-
late relationships between
nations with unusual per-
ception.
From this mutual admi-
ration came the first
Jackson amendment au-
thorizing military sales
credits for Israel in 1971. It
should be recalled that until
that time, Israel received no
military assistance of this
kind from the United
States.
But beyond the legal au-
thorization, the amend-
ment, bitterly opposed by
the arch-foe of Israel,
Foreign Relations Chair-
man William Fulbright,
was a resounding statement
by the Congress that the
U.S. would provide direct
military assistance to Is-
rael.
During that period also,
Jackson visited Israel and
correctly predicted that the
Soviet SAM missiles being
installed near the Suez
Canal would pose a grave
threat to Israel's air opera-
tions in a future conflict.
His warning — unheeded by

BILL COOK BUICK 1/4

Court Ruling
on Neo-Nazi
Is Appealed

is pleased to announce

the ADDITION to our sales staff
of

BONN (JTA)— The State
Prosecutor has appealed a
decision by a Nuremburg
court not to try Karl-Heinz
Hoffmann, a neo-Nazi ac-
tivist, for the murder of
Jewish publisher Shlomo
Levin on Dec. 19, 1980 for
lack of evidence. The pro-
secutor promised to collect
additional evidence im-
plicating Hoffmann in the
crime.
Hoffmann, 43, headed an
extreme rightwing organi-
zation, Werksportsgruppe
Hoffmann, which mas-
queraded as a sports club
while engaging in acts of
violence and anti-Semitic
incitement. It has been offi-
cially outlawed.

CHARLES WARSHAW

Sales Representative

It has been a
pleasure serving you
in the past and I
look forward to being of
service in the future.

27911 Grand River, Farmington Hills, Mi. 48024

(313) 471-0800

the U.S. government which
dismissed Israel's protests
— unfortunately was borne
out during the Yom Kippur
War.
In the public mind,
however, Jackson was
identified more closely
with his Freedom of
Emigration Amendment.
The Jackson-Vanik
Amendment undoub-
tedly brought freedom to
thousands of Soviet Jews
who otherwise would still
be in Russia. Ironically,
the threat of the legisla-
tion, coinciding with
Soviet expectations of
great trade with the Un-
ited States, produced
greater results than the
law itself.
But it was not easy con-
vincing both Houses of Con-
gress to pass this landmark
legislation — especially
while fighting a hostile
Administration whose op-
position was quarterbacked
by the formidable Henry
Kissinger.
As one who negotiated
the actual language of the
Amendment and was pre-
sent during the Jackson -
Kissinger encounters, j can
vouch for Jackson's cool re-
solve and steadfastness
throughout, at times in the
face of wavering Congres-
sional colleagues, and even
Jewish leadership too eager
to compromise. But Jackson
prevailed — and Congress
for the first time asserted
itself in significantly affect-
ing foreign policy.
Supporters of Israel
throughout the world have
cause to deeply mourn
Jackson's' untimely death.
He set an example of convic-
tion and action on behalf of

e

.

God helps those that help
themselves.

Israel as being in the best
interest of the United States
that will be difficult to dup-
licate.
In Washington on Tues-
day, there will be a special
Jewish memorial service for
Scoop Jackson. It will be an
opportunity to express not
only grief, but gratitude for
a dear friend who will be
sorely missed.
* * *
The California Sup-
reme Court ruled last
week that a specially
scheduled Dec. 13 re-
ferendum on a
Republican-drawn reap-
portionment plan (the
"Sebastiani" plan) was
unconstitutional. This in-
itiative, which Republi-
cans backed in a move to
regain political domi-
nance, would have seri-
ously affected the re-
election of several out-
standing pro-Israel Rep-
resentatives including
the veteran Henry Wax-
man, and key House
Foreign Affairs Commit-
tee members Mel Levine
and Howard Berman.
Consequently, the
Court's ruling should effec-
tively preserve the re-

tion of the American Jewish
community.

election hopes of several key
Congressional supporters of
Israel in the 1984 elections.
On a negative note, ob-
servers here who have been
monitoring former Rep.
Paul Findley's political ac-
tivities now predict he may
very well try to regain his
House seat. Findley, who
was a pro-PLO spokesman
on the Foreign Affairs
Committee was narrowly
defeated by Democrat Dick
Durbin in 1982. A re-match
would undoubtedly and de-
servedly arouse the atten-

ee'

M

A

LTER $:
LNG

OF HARVARD ROW

Designers of Fine Furs
Complete Fur Service

11 MILE & LAHSER
Phone: 358-0850

If you're not

wearing it,
sell it.

You can't enjoy jewelry if it's sitting in your safe
deposit box. Sell it for immediate cash. We pur-
chase fine gems, Diamonds and Gold Jewelry.

A SERVICE TO PRIVATE OWNERS, BANKS AND ESTATES.

a*,

00/Alot

est.
1919

30400 Telegraph Road
Suites 104, 134
Birmingham, Mi. 48010
(313) 642-5575

AWARDED CERTIFICATE BY GIA IN GRADING & EVALUATION.

GEMOLOGIST
DIAMONTOLOGIS.T

Hrs. daily til 5:30,
Sat. til 4:30

LAWRENCE M. ALLAN
President

MICHIGAN'S LARGEST CLOTHING OUTLET!

RATED 4 STAR IN THE UNDERGROUND SHOPPER

MEN'S SUIT $
SPECIAL

ORIG. $225. THESE EXPERTLY
TAILORED VESTED SUITS IN A
GREAT YEAR-ROUND POLY-
WOOL BLEND COME IN SINGLE-
BREASTED STRIPES, PLAIDS
AND SOLID COLORS.

SIZES 38 TO 46 SHORTS, REG'S,
LONGS, SIZES 48 TO 52 JUST $10.
MORE. AND, SAVE UP, TO 50%
AND MORE ON OUR CUSTOM
QUALITY FAMOUS LABEL SUITS
LIKE HART, SCHAFFNER & MARX,
ADOLFO, OSCAR DE LA RENTA,
LANVIN, MARZOTTO, AND MORE1

LARGE SELECTION OF SLACKS,
DRESS SHIRTS, JACKETS,
SPORTCOATS AND TRENCHCOATS



BOTANY 500
ALL WEATHER COATS

Choose from British Tan, Grey, Navy, Black

Ziplined

NOW

180°

BLOOMFIELD TOWNE SQUARE

(FORMERLY MIRACLE MILE)

TELEGRAPH N. OF SQUARE LAKE RD.

Mon., Tues., Wed. 10-6; Thurs. & Fri. 10-8
Saturday 10-7

Visa

SUNDAY 12-5 p.m.

MasterCard

PLAN TO ATTEND THE 69TH ANNUAL BANQUET OF

YESHIVATH BETH YEHUDAH

.

NOVEMBER 13th, 1983 AT
THE FAIRLANE MANOR, DEARBORN, MICHIGAN

, ,

Mr. Jack Shenkman

GOLDEN TORAH AWARD RECIPIENT

Couvert $75.00 per person
for Reservations call 557 6750
SPECIAL GUEST SPEAKER THE HONORABLE JEANE J. KIRKPATRICK AMBASSADOR TO THE U.N.
CO CHAIRMEN
IVAN BLOCH, DAVID HOLTZMAN, SPENCER PARTRICH, MICKEY SHAPRIO, I. WILLIAM SHERR

-

-

JEANE J. KIRKPATRICK

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan