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September 30, 1983 - Image 22

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1983-09-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

22 Friday, September 30, 1983

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

Jews of Northern Michigan in Struggle to Maintain Community

INDIANAPOLIS — The
battle to keep the Jewish
community alive in the
Houghton area of northern
Michigan was described by
Harvey L. Sachs, a professor
at Michigan Technological
University, in a recent

Jewish Post and Opinion ar-
ticle.
In the story, Prof. Sachs
asked, "Can a Jewish com-
munity exist in the remote
Upper Peninsula of Michi-
gan?" The article continued:
"The Jewish community

at Temple Jacob in Han-
cock, Mich., across the
Keweenaw Waterway from
Houghton, thrived before
the 1914 mine strike that
reduced the populous Cop-
per Country from a bustling
center of 85,000 to ghost

towns and decaying cities.
"The beautiful Temple
Jacob synagogue re-
mains but is active only
during the high holidays
when a student rabbi is
brought in. No regular
shabat services are held.

The Midrasha College of Jewish Studies
and
The Greater Detroit Chapter of Hadassah
Present Their

FALL LECTURE, LUNCH A.ND LEARNING SERIES

Where:

Midrosho College of Jewish Studies
United Hebrew Schools • 21550 West Twelve Mile Rood • 352-7117/354-1050

THE PROGRAM

Opening Lecture:

October 6, 1983

"Con American Jews Survive Without Israel?"

Dr. Yehudo Rosenman, Sociologist, National Director of
Jewish Communal Affairs, American Jewish Committee.

Followed by Lunch at Noon

Mini-Courses: Choose one of the courses listed below

October 13 - November 3

"Is It Good For The Jews? — Living in Latin America"
Dr. Judith Laikin Elkin

Or

"Radicals, Rebels and Realists: Social Movements
in Modern Jewish Life"
Dr. Jonathan Fishbane

Or

"A Menorah Is A Menorah Is A Menorah? — Jewish Festival
and Ceremonial Observance: An Unorthodox View"
Dr. Joseph Gutmann

Or

"The Camera Views Creation: A New Look at Genesis"
Dr. Gerald A. Teller

Closing Lecture:

November 10

"Christian Support For Israel in Congress and the
Community"Mark D. Siljander, Republican Congressman,
4th Congressional District, Member of Foreign Affairs
Committee, Sub-Committee on Europe and Middle East

REGISTRATION

Nome

Home Phone

Address

I need
Plan
Plan
Plan

City

babysitting - Name of Child
A - $30 includes lectures, classes and two lunches
B - $15 includes classes on October 13 - November 3
C - $15 includes lectures on October 6 and Nov. 10 and lunches

Class

Bus. Phone

Zip

Age

Please indicate your choice of
Plan A, B or C

1st choice

Mail to:

Midrasha College of Jewish Studies
21550 W. Twelve Mile Road • Southfield, Michigan 48076

2nd choice

Make checks payable to:
Midrasha College of Jewish Studies

Yet, thanks to a steady
turnover of Jewish fa-
culty members passing
through Michigan
Technological Univer-
sity, the congregation
persists.
"The community's older
generation is still made up
of the German Jews almost
single handedly saved from
the Holocaust through the
efforts of the late Norbert
Kahn who financed and
sponsored nearly 40 rela-
tives before the Nazis cut
them off.
"There is no kosher
butcher in 'Copper Coun-
try,' and anyone wanting
Pass'over matzot must
transport them at least 250
miles, for the largest town
in the Upper Peninsula is.
Marquette with only 30,000
people — and it is 100 miles
away. Besides the student
rabbi imported for two
weeks a year, we are visited
occasionally by a Luba-
vitcher rebbe.
"Jews in the Upper
Peninsula's wintry forests
(six months of snow) are al-
most as rare as elephants,
and we are sometimes vis-
ited by people who have
never seen a Jew and ex-
perience us with the same
curiosity and awe as they
would when seeing an
elephant for the first time.
Then in spite of our limited

resources and educations,
we are spokesmen for the
Jewish people and Judaism.
"What we need is a lay
rabbi, someone who can
earn his own livelihood
and still serve as a
spiritual leader. Unfor-
tunately, that is not what
American yeshivas pro-
duce. In the meantime we
fend off the persistent ef-
forts of missionaries who
see us as fair game, and
we hope that our children
will some day be able to
date someone Jewish. We
can import matzot and
Jewish books, but not
Jewish companisonship.
Assimilation is a near
certainty.
"Half a million American
Jews live in small towns,
but though there was an air-
lift to save the 30,000 Jews
in Iran from Moslem fana-
tics, there is no program to
save our children from as-
similation, no scholarships
to Jewish summer camps,
no source of teachers beyond
the community's financial
means.
"The most we hear from
the world Jewish commun-
ity is appeals for funds for
Israel. I would like to see
some large city congrega-
tion adopt us. If something
is not done, we, like the
Jews of China, will _simply
disappear.

MDA was Brainchild
of Miami Beach Doctor

NEW YORK — Magen
David Adorn (MDA), Isre-
al's emergency medical ser-
vice, was the brainchild of
Dr. Cecelia Davis, now 91
years old and living in
Miami Beach.
In 1918, Dr. Davis
mobilized Zionists in
Chicago and other Ameri-
can communities to assist
young Jewish men who
were going to Palestine to
fight with the British dur-
ing World War I. The doctor
and others like herself pro-
vided the young soldiers
with meals and lodging as
they left for the Middle
East.
One man she personally
administered to was David
Ben-Gurion. She insisted
that the fledgling Jewish

Claim Rosenberg
Ally Surfaced
in Soviet Union

DR. CECELIA DAVIS

service organization be
symbolized by a Red Magen
David, the Jewish Star of
David.
Dr. Davis' idea became
an official reality on May

7, 1930 in Tel Aviv when
MDA in Israel was
founded by several dozen

dedicated volunteers as
the first aid society for
the city of Tel Aviv.
MDA was recognized by
Knesset law in 1950 as Is-
rael's official emergency
medical service.
The International Red
Cross and the Soviety of Red
Cross do not recognize the
Red Star of David emblem
and, therefore, MDA is
excluded from membership
in these organizations.

WASHINGTON — A
long-missing associate of
Julius Rosenberg, the
American executed in 1953
for espionage, may have as-
sumed a new identity in the
Soviet Union, according to
Mark Kuchment, a science
historian at Harvard Uni-
versity.
Kuchment has uncovered
evidence that Alfred Sarant
fled across the U.S.- Blast Injures 5
JERUSALEM (JTA) —
Mexican border shortly
after Rosenberg's arrest Five people were slightly in-
and, under the name Philip jured Sunday when a hand
Staros, lived and worked in grenade was thrown into
Russia until his death in the Nablus municipal park-
1979. Sarant reportedly ing lot. The wounded were
played a key role in the de- an Israel Defense Force sol-
velopment of Soviet milit- dier, an Israeli border patrol
policeman and three Arabs.
ary computers.

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