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September 09, 1983 - Image 96

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1983-09-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

96 Friday, September 9, 1983

Best wishes for a
happy, healthy
New Year

GIZELLA BAKER, FAY,
ESTHER & ANNETTE

\Inn nalz

• to all
our friends
and relatives

MR. & MRS. GEORGE FISHER
Spartanburg, S.C.

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

Historian's Work Has Roots in the Holocaust

By HELENA FLUSFEDER

World Zionist Press Service

JERUSALEM — On an
April evening at the

Best wishes for a
happy, healthy
New Year

BARBARA & GAYLE RAIMI

Best wishes for a
happy, healthy
New Year

DANNY, MARGI, GEOFFREY
& MICHAEL WERBER

I wish my family and friends a
very healthy, happy and prosperous
New Year

MRS. MAX GLADSTONE

I wish my family and friends a
very healthy, happy and prosperous
New Year

MRS. LOUIS (TILLY) ROSE

Wishing all our family and
friends a year of
health and happiness

ARLENE & CHUCK BEERMAN,
KEN, SHARON & MICHAEL

Wishing all our family and
friends a year of
health and happiness

Wishing all our family and
friends a year of
health and -happiness

A Very Happy and Healthy
New Year to All Our Friends
and Family

IZRAEL, LILT & NANCY BESSER

A Very Happy and Healthy
New Year to All Our Friends
and Family

LORETTA & LARRIE GLOBERSON

Jerusalem Theater, seven
scholars were awarded the
annual Israel Prize for their
outstanding contribution to
Israeli culture.
Among them was Prof.
Shaul Friedlander, whose
family perished in the
Holocaust while he was
saved by his entry into a
convent. He now teaches
history at Tel Aviv Univer-
sity and has written several
books on Nazism and the
Holocaust. His moving
biography, widely read all
over the world, is called
"When Memory Comes."
Born in Prague in 1932
into an assimilated Jewish
family, Friedlander
nonetheless remembers an
atmosphere of a "special
Judaism" which he never
found anywhere else. "We
were Jews formally but we
had nothing Jewish in our
lives."

In the years of his
youth, Friedlander re-
calls his personal feeling
of anxiety. However, in
the late 1930s, as tensions
rose in Europe and in
order to evade the Ger-
man occupation, Fried-
lander's parents moved
to France. Following the
German occupation and
as the numbers of arrests
of "foreign" Jews in-
creased (including chil-
dren), Shaul's parents
panicked. In their at-
tempt to ensure their
son's safety, they chose a
Jewish childrens' home
near La Souterraine in
France for his refuge.

A family friend had the
foresight to take him away
from there before the Nazis
transported all the children
to camps.
Shaul was installed in
1942 in a strict Catholic
boarding school in order to
ensure his safety. His name
was changed to Paul-Henri
Marie Freland and after an
initial period of illness and
unhappiness, he settled
down to alife completely
immersed in Catholicism,
later portrayed in his auto-
biography.
A priest later revealed to
him the horrors of Au-
schwitz, where Shaul's par-
ents had died, and read to
him from the text of a
French historian who had
studied anti-Semitism.
After this, Friedlander was
able to accept his Judaism
but was obviously left with
terrible dilemmas about his
own identity.

Today, seated in his
small office in the Wiener
Library of Tel Aviv Uni-
versity, he described the
difficulties of accepting
another culture — in Is-
rael.

"When I came to this
country at the age of 15, I
was able to switch over to
my new surroundings, to a
life totally molded by
Jewish/Israeli norms and
values. But soon enough I
started feeling a kind of dis
sonance. That is, I felt the
new culture was superim-
posed on something deeper
which simply couldn't be
pushed away."
In his later work as an

historian and in his auto-
biography, Friedlander was
to try to make some sense of
what had happened to him,
and in a wider sense to all
European Jews during
World War II. the most ef-
fective way of piecing the
picture together again was,
for him, through the use of
memory.
In fact he was haunted by
words from the famous
Czech legend about the
Golem, by the writer Gus-

May the coming

Nazism and Nazi anti-
Semitism as well as various
attitudes of the surrounding
society."

year be filled

with health and

larnn taw m

happiness for

to all

my friends

all our family

and relatives

and friends

REBECCA ROSSEN

SHIRLEY & HARRY TANKSLEY

We wish our family and friends a
very healthy, happy and prosperous
New Year

MARK, SANDY, AMY & RIKKI GANTZ

Wishing all our family and
friends a year of
health and happiness

SHAUL FRIEDLANDER

tav Meyrink. This novel
tells the story of a man who
recovered his forgotten past
through mystical experi-
ences.

So did Friedlander go
through a "process of
remembering. I also un-
derstood my place in life,
in society, in Jewishness.
For a long time, this past
was a frozen past, a dead
one. Slowly I started feel-
ing it again." However, it
took a long time before he
was able to write it all
down.

.

This could not come about
immediately on his arrival
in Israel during the War of
Independence, when he
lived first in the youth vil-
lage of Nira and then at the
agricultural center of Ben
Shemen near Natanya.
Subsequently he started
to study political science but
after some years "I aban-
doned the theoretical side of
political science to work
more and more in contem-
porary history, focussing on
Nazism and its origins and
on the destruction of Euro-
pean Jews." Of his histori-
cal work he says, "I was ob-
viously responding to a
need. Each historian choos-
ing a subject responds to a
personal need — whatever
the object of his work."
It was for his outstanding
work as a historian that he
received the Israel Prize. He
pursued his research in dip-
lomatic history and later
wrote a book on Pope Pius
XII. Since then he has
worked in "related fields,
looking at the origins of

Cancer Fighter

JERUSALEM — Doctors
at Hebrew University have
proven that Israel can
ecomomically produce the
cancer fighting chemical In-
terferon. The research uses
yet another of Israel's
"natural resources," fore-
skins. They are now raw
material in the fight
against cancer.

A Very Happy and Healthy
New Year to All Our Friends
and Family

THE GOODMAN'S
MARILYN, BARRY BRIAN & LISA

,

A Very Happy and Healthy
New Year to All Our Friends
and Family

DR. & MRS. LOUIS HEYMAN
& FAMILY

A Very Happy and Healthy
New Year to All Our Friends
and Family

LOTTIE & HARRY KOLTONOW

A Very Happy and Healthy
New Year to All Our Friends
and Family

THE LEFKOFSKY'S

BILL, SANDY, JODI, STEVE & ERIC

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