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August 12, 1983 - Image 22

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1983-08-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

22 Friday, August 12, 1983

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

$300,000 Bequest
to NY Library

'ROLLS'

ROYCE,

460:4,1-1.

C

isttfl#Ge

Buick Honda

28585 Telegraph Rd. Across From Tel-Twelve Mall
Southfield, Mich.

(313)353-1300

NEW YORK (JTA) —
The New York Public Li-
brary has announced a be-
quest of $300,000 to its
Jewish division.
Dr. Vartan Gregorian, li-
brary president, said the
gift "assures the perpetua-
tion of the library's Jewish
division as a vital source of
knowledge for scholars of all
nations."
He said the gift from the
estate of Jacob Perlow is in-
tended for acquisition and
conservation, and for public
programs and exhibits to
make the Jewish division
better known. He said the
bequest is comprised of an
endowment of $250,000,
plus $50,000 in funds which
are immediately available.
Perlow was a Polish-born
immigrant who came to the
United States in the early .
1920s and developed a suc-
cessful real estate business
in New York. He died in
June 1981, leaving a por-
tion of his estate to be dis-
tributed to charitable
organizations.

Jewish sage Solomon Ibn
Gabirol was known among
Christian philosophers of
the Middle Ages by the
name "Avicebron.

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Wednesday
Emerald Lanes

6:30 p:m.

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B'nai B'rith Couplets

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Ben Lusky Traveling

Sunday
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Pisgah

Aridor, Duizin Clash Over
Funding of Project Renewal

JERUSALEM (JTA) —
Finance Minister Yoram
Aridor and Leon Duizin,
chairman of the World
Zionist Organization and
. Jewish Agency Executives,
clashed in a sharp exchange
over funding of Project Re-
newal, the program to re-
vitalize slum areas in Is-
rael.
Aridor reportedly accused
Duizin and Akiva Levinsky,
the Jewish Agency trea-
surer, of failing to meet the
commitments they under-
took as equal partners in
the project. Under the
agreement, the Jewish
Agency is in charge of social
welfare aspects of Project
Renewal, while the gov-
ernment takes care of the
physical elements.
Specifically, Aridor de-
clared, a contribution of $5
million, promised by the
Jewish Agency five months
ago for the rehabilitation of
13 deteriorated neighbor-
hoods, has not yet been
transmitted to the govern-
ment.
Duizin, reportedly was
furious about both the
content and the style of
Aridor's charges, telling
Aridor he would not let
him treat the Jewish
Agency "the way he
treated the industrialists
and the doctors."
Meanwhile, Dulzin said
the rehabilitation of 15
more Project Renewal
neighborhoods will be com-
pleted next year.
He also told the weekly
meeting of the Agency
Executive that another 30
neighborhoods will be re-
habilitated within two or
three years. Duizin stated
that considerable progress
could already be noticed in
the Project Renewal un-
dertaking to rehabilitate 84
deteriorated neighbor-
hoods, housing 600,000
residents.

He said the main problem
now was to determine who
would be responsible for the
Project after the Jewish
Agency fulfills its role as a
partner with the govern-
ment in the project.
Duizin told the WZO
Executive that he had
asked the WZO's settle-
ment department co,
chairman, Raanan Weitz,
a noted expert on rural
development, to prepare
a comprehensive plan to
help the moshavim
(cooperative farm vil-
lages) solve their growing
financial crisis.
Moshav spokesmen have
claimed that the coopera-
tives are foundering be-
cause of lack of government
support to help them over-
come problems arising from
a shrinking export market.
Some 150 moshavim of
the 239 moshavim nation-
wide are said to be in finan-
cial difficulties and some of
them, especially in the
Negev region, are in danger
of closing down completely.
Many farmers have been
threatened with legal ac-
tion and possible fofeclo-
sures for failing to pay their
debts. According to Yair

Yakir, the registrar of
Cooperative Organizations,
the debts of the 239
moshavim amount to $70
million.
Pesach Grupper, act-
ing agriculture minister,
has compained that the
Finance Ministry has
failed to provide the
necessary funds to help
the faltering moshavim.
The Finance Ministry has
responded by saying that
funds provided to the
ministry are allocated by
the ministry on the basis
of its list of priorities.
Agriculture experts say
the main problem with farm
exports is the government's
slow rate of devaluation of
the shekel, which makes Is-
raeli exports of fruits, veg-
etables and flowers too ex-
pensive on the European
market where they once
enjoyed premium prices be-
cause of quality and early
marketing.
The kibutzim are also af4
fected by export exchange
rate problems, but to a les-
ser degree than the
moshavim and private far-
mers. Although originally
based only on agriculture,
virtually all kibutzim today
have adapted themselves to
the contracting profit earn-
ings of farming.
The bulk of their income
is derived from industrial
enterprises they have estab-
lished within each kibutz.
While they share agricul-
tural export problems with
the moshavim, the kibutzim
share industrial export
problems with other indus-
tries.
In the moshavim, each
individual farmer tries to
extract a living from his
own land and there is no
industrial enterprise to
fall back on to increase
their profit margins. The
future of the moshavim
may now depend on re-
ducing the number of
moshavim, limiting over-
production and agricul-
tural exports and engag-
ing in what some experts
refer to as a "face lift."
But unlike the kibbutzim,
where industries tend to be
highly sophisticated, oper-
ated by highly motivated
workers and managers who
can adapt quickly to new
problems as they arise,
moshavim are traditionally
less able to adapt to chang-
ing technologies.

Magazine Delves
Into Mysticism

HOLLYWOOD, Fla — A
bi-monthly periodical
exploring Jewish mysticism
and the contemporary rele-
vance of the Kabala is now
available.
The magazine, "Four
Worlds Journal," features
original articles, inter-
views, book reviews and
poetry.
For information on the
magazine or to begin a sub-
scription, write to "Four
Worlds Journal," 11301
N.W. 15 St. Hollywood, Fla.
33026.

d.•

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